Arthur_Rimbaud Complete Volume I

Arthur_Rimbaud Complete Volume I by Arthur Rimbaud

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Arthur Rimbaud

A book by Arthur Rimbaud

Arthur Rimbaud was born on October 20, 1854 in Charleville in northeastern France. His father, Frederic Rimbaud, a military man by profession, served in Algeria, his mother, Marie-Catherine-Vitali Cuif, was from a wealthy peasant family. When the boy was four years old, his father left the family, since then the boy was raised by his mother. Rimbaud studied at the Lyceum in Charleville. After the publication of his first poem in 1870, at the age of 16, Rimbaud traveled to northern France and southern Belgium. At the age of seventeen, Rimbaud met the poet Paul Verlaine in Paris and for some time became his friend. For some time he lives in the house of Paul Verlaine, later he rented a room. In Paris, Rimbaud participates in the uprising of the Paris Commune. In 1872 Paul Verlaine left his family and left with Rimbaud for London. After living there for some time, they travel to Europe and part in Brussels, after Verlaine, in a heated dispute, under the influence of absinthe, shoots Rimbaud in the wrist. Verlaine was sentenced to 2 years in prison. After parting with Verlaine, Rimbaud returns home to Roche`s farm. In a state of spiritual crisis, he wrote a prose poem Une saison en enfer, in which he renounced all his former poetry; he managed to publish it in a circulation of five hundred copies, but none of them were sold. In 1874 he became close to Germain Nouveau and lived with him for several months in England, earning his living by studying French. At the same time he wrote a cycle of prose poems, Illuminations, which completed his work; he was then in his twenties. Since 1875, a new period of A.

Rembo`s life began - the period of wandering. In February 1875 he left for Germany to study German; settled in Stuttgart. In May, left without a livelihood, he went on foot to Italy. Reaching Milan, he fell seriously ill. Repatriated to France. In April 1876 he left for Vienna, but was soon expelled from Austria. May 19, 1876, arriving in Holland, joined the Dutch colonial forces. In July, he arrived in Batavia (Indonesia) with his regiment. Three weeks later he deserted. In an English sailing ship he sailed to Europe and at the end of December ended up in Charleville. In 1877 he went to Bremen and Hamburg; hired a translator at the Luasse circus, with whom he traveled all over Sweden and Denmark. In September 1877 he made an unsuccessful attempt to leave for Alexandria. In the spring of 1878 he went to Hamburg, where he tried in vain to enlist in a company that provided food for the German colonies in the East. After spending some time in France, in October 1878 crossed the Vosges on foot, then through Switzerland and Genoa reached Alexandria. From December 1878 he worked in Cyprus as a manager of a quarry owned by a French firm. In June 1879 he returned to his homeland and worked for some time on his mother`s farm near Charleville. To a friend who visited him, he said that he no longer thinks about literature. In the spring of 1880 he again found himself in Cyprus, then left for Egypt. In August he reached Aden, where he worked in a firm that sold leather and coffee; later sent to Harer (East Ethiopia). In 1882-1883 he traveled through the unexplored areas of Ogaden; his description was published by the Geographical Society. In 1886, he was engaged in the sale of weapons to the ruler of the Ethiopian region Shoah Menelik. I didn’t know that in the same year the “Fashion” magazine published a number of his poems and part of the Illumination. In 1887–1891 he headed the trading post in Harer; was the representative of the S.

Tiana trading company in Aden. In February 1891 he fell seriously ill (sarcoma of the knee joint) and on May 9 was sent from Aden to his homeland. Upon arrival in Marseille, he was admitted to hospital, where his leg was amputated at the end of May. November 10, 1891 died in a Marseille hospital at the age of thirty-seven; the hospital card read: "merchant Rimbaud." When he was dying, a collection of his poems was already published in Paris - a new life for the poet began.

Arthur_Rimbaud Complete Volume I PDF

Arthur Rimbaud was born on October 20, 1854 in Charleville in northeastern France. His father, Frederic Rimbaud, a military man by profession, served in Algeria, his mother, Marie-Catherine-Vitali Cuif, was from a wealthy peasant family. When the boy was four years old, his father left the family, since then the boy was raised by his mother. Rimbaud studied at the Lyceum in Charleville. After the publication of his first poem in 1870, at the age of 16, Rimbaud traveled to northern France and southern Belgium. At the age of seventeen, Rimbaud met the poet Paul Verlaine in Paris and for some time became his friend. For some time he lives in the house of Paul Verlaine, later he rented a room. In Paris, Rimbaud participates in the uprising of the Paris Commune. In 1872 Paul Verlaine left his family and left with Rimbaud for London. After living there for some time, they travel to Europe and part in Brussels, after Verlaine, in a heated dispute, under the influence of absinthe, shoots Rimbaud in the wrist. Verlaine was sentenced to 2 years in prison. After parting with Verlaine, Rimbaud returns home to Roche`s farm. In a state of spiritual crisis, he wrote a prose poem Une saison en enfer, in which he renounced all his former poetry; he managed to publish it in a circulation of five hundred copies, but none of them were sold. In 1874 he became close to Germain Nouveau and lived with him for several months in England, earning his living by studying French. At the same time he wrote a cycle of prose poems, Illuminations, which completed his work; he was then in his twenties. Since 1875, a new period of A. Rembo`s life began - the period of wandering. In February 1875 he left for Germany to study German; settled in Stuttgart. In May, left without a livelihood, he went on foot to Italy. Reaching Milan, he fell seriously ill. Repatriated to France. In April 1876 he left for Vienna, but was soon expelled from Austria. May 19, 1876, arriving in Holland, joined the Dutch colonial forces. In July, he arrived in Batavia (Indonesia) with his regiment. Three weeks later he deserted. In an English sailing ship he sailed to Europe and at the end of December ended up in Charleville. In 1877 he went to Bremen and Hamburg; hired a translator at the Luasse circus, with whom he traveled all over Sweden and Denmark. In September 1877 he made an unsuccessful attempt to leave for Alexandria. In the spring of 1878 he went to Hamburg, where he tried in vain to enlist in a company that provided food for the German colonies in the East. After spending some time in France, in October 1878 crossed the Vosges on foot, then through Switzerland and Genoa reached Alexandria. From December 1878 he worked in Cyprus as a manager of a quarry owned by a French firm. In June 1879 he returned to his homeland and worked for some time on his mother`s farm near Charleville. To a friend who visited him, he said that he no longer thinks about literature. In the spring of 1880 he again found himself in Cyprus, then left for Egypt. In August he reached Aden, where he worked in a firm that sold leather and coffee; later sent to Harer (East Ethiopia). In 1882-1883 he traveled through the unexplored areas of Ogaden; his description was published by the Geographical Society. In 1886, he was engaged in the sale of weapons to the ruler of the Ethiopian region Shoah Menelik. I didn’t know that in the same year the “Fashion” magazine published a number of his poems and part of the Illumination. In 1887–1891 he headed the trading post in Harer; was the representative of the S. Tiana trading company in Aden. In February 1891 he fell seriously ill (sarcoma of the knee joint) and on May 9 was sent from Aden to his homeland. Upon arrival in Marseille, he was admitted to hospital, where his leg was amputated at the end of May. November 10, 1891 died in a Marseille hospital at the age of thirty-seven; the hospital card read: "merchant Rimbaud." When he was dying, a collection of his poems was already published in Paris - a new life for the poet began.