The Antichrist

The Antichrist by Joseph Roth

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Long out of print in English, this dizzying hybrid of novel, essay, and polemic has less to do with religion than with what Roth sees as the disintegrating moral fabric of the modern world.

Written while Roth was in exile from Germany and his native Austria following the rise of Nazism, this work was composed in cafés across free Europe after all his works in German went up in flames. Such events no doubt influence the apocalytic tones of The Antichrist`s protaganist, J.R., a journalist hired by an inscrutable media mogul hellbent on exposing evidence of the "Antichrist" throughout the world. This mission leads J.R. to authoritarian political regimes such as Red Earth (the Soviet Union) but also other poisonous terrains like The Land of Shadows (Hollywood) — it becomes all too clear that it is Roth`s mission to chart the whole of civilization`s slide into moral and political chaos. But herein lies the extraordinary strength and appeal of this work, as Roth is powerfully and even hilariously prescient. Mixing the diatribe with his trademark sardonic wit, he miraculously predicts the advent of the Holocaust, globalization, multimedia — even the paparazzi. Combining beautiful but savage writing with visual imagery out of a Coen Brothers movie, this is an invaluable addition to the Roth canon in English.

117 pages, published in
Joseph Roth

A book by Joseph Roth

Moses Joseph Roth - an outstanding Austrian writer, classic of world literature of the 20th century, author of famous novels, a genius and holy drunkard - singer of the Habsburg idyll with its multicultural diversity and tolerance.  Joseph Roth was born in Galicia, in the town of Brody (now the administrative center of the Lviv region, Ukraine) on September 2, 1894. The population of Brod, which belonged to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, was three-quarters Jewish, and a quarter consisted of Ukrainians, Poles and Germans. Roth did not know his father: soon after his marriage, he went mad and ended up in a hospital. The mother protected her only son from shameful misfortune. Barely literate, she made every effort to raise and educate the boy. Thanks to his mother, Moses, Joseph studied not in a community Jewish school, but in a citywide one. Teaching was conducted mainly in German, the knowledge of which gave hope for future success. In addition, Roth studied Polish (without zeal) and Hebrew. Then he entered the gymnasium named after Crown Prince Rudolf, where he became interested in literature, the poetry of Heinrich Heine. In 1913, Roth became a student at Lvov University. Dependence on the rich brother of his mother, in whose house he lived, oppressed him. The following year, Joseph Roth moved to the capital and entered the University of Vienna. The literary talent of the young philologist-Germanist was revealed during the First World War. He writes and publishes in the periodical press of the Austrian capital the stories "An Exemplary Student" (1916) and "Barbara" (1918), numerous poems. In 1916, student Roth unexpectedly interrupted his studies and volunteered for the army. How could they explain this amazing act: and unexpectedly awakened patriotism, and curiosity! As a twenty-year-old recruit, the future creator of the Radetzky March stood in a cordon at the funeral of Emperor Franz Joseph and sobbed, realizing that not just an old man who had outlived his time, but an era was buried in the crypt of the Capuchins. The unit in which Roth served was located in the swamps of Galicia, not far from the writer`s native places. He ended up not on the front line, but in the divisional press service. In December 1918, he again found himself in Vienna, but did not continue his studies. He went into journalism: by his own admission, "out of despair and out of idleness." He was published in the left-wing radical press, especially often in the Vienna “Der Neue Tag.” In the early 1920s, Roth was close to the Socialist Party of Austria and the Social Democratic Party of Germany, collaborated in their leading bodies, defended the Weimar republic, but also criticized it from the left, rightly reproaching it for indifference to the victims of the war.

He and the German intelligentsia got it from him - for revanchism, militaryism, national arrogance, craving for the irrational and mystical.

Under his "glosses" in the Social Democratic press was often signed - "Red Josef" or "Red Roth" (Der rote Roth) .After 1923, the radical left aggressiveness of the Red Roth began to decline: he willingly collaborates in publications of a moderate liberal wing - "Frankfurter Zeitung", "Berliner Bersen-kurir", “Prager Tagtblatt," however, did not hide his leftist convictions.

In the early post-war years, Roth did not separate himself from the intellectual life of both republics that emerged on the ruins of empires. face - Austrian and Weimar. Moreover, he was more willing to collaborate in Berlin publications than in Vienna, perhaps because Germany, with its spirit of nationalist militarism, provided more material for satire. Roth`s first novel "The Web" (1923) was published with sequels in the Viennese socialist "Arbeiter Zeitung", and a separate edition came out only many years after the death of the author, in 1967. The editorial offices of newspapers and magazines competed with each other for the right to publish Rotovsk materials. As a highly paid journalist, Roth did not get out of debt, lived in hotels, and did not have his own home. Chronic alcoholism was the main cause of poverty. In France, where he worked for quite a long time as a correspondent for the Frankfurter Zeitung, he felt much better, but upon his return to Germany the blues and binges began with renewed vigor. Roth, with enviable persistence, begins to seek a journalistic trip to the USSR, to Soviet Russia, with which he still pinned hopes for a reorganization of the world acceptable to him. This business trip (summer and early autumn of 1926) was a life and creative milestone for him, it was the beginning of a deep inner turning point. He personally saw not only Russia, his path lay through Warsaw and Minsk to Moscow, from there he made a long voyage, visiting Nizhny Novgorod, Kazan, Samara, Samarkand, Astrakhan, Baku, Tbilisi, Odessa, and through Ukraine returned to Moscow, after which I also visited in Leningrad. Visiting Lviv more than once in the 1920s and later 30s (Roth was invited by his Polish colleagues as one of the most popular and more often other authors translated and published in interwar Poland), he tried to state the inviolability of "that still world", the Habsburg idyll , multicultural diversity and tolerance. Returning to Berlin or later to Paris, he talked and wrote about the increase in scars, about the almost complete healing of wounds, the untying of knots, the self-regeneration of culture in Galicia. In the winter of 1937, Roth came to Lvov for the last time. “I assure you, friends, that we are attending the last of such holidays in Europe,” he addressed the selected Lviv society, not without the influence of alcohol and awakened forebodings. Not all of those present wanted to believe him. The reasons for the death of 45-year-old Joseph Roth are most often cited as alcoholism and nostalgia - the former, obviously, stemmed from the latter, and vice versa. The writer nurtured both diseases in himself, at one time, even before the great disintegration of 1914-1918, choosing for himself the fate of an emigrant, a traveler to the West and a hotel recluse, and also making escape his permanent state. The real cause of death was premonitions - the catastrophe should begin immediately after the summer, in some ninety-three days. Then there was the Holocaust, the factories of death, the tragedy of Central Europe - all at once together with the war, from which his heart of a holy drunkard would have burst all the same.

The Antichrist PDF

Moses Joseph Roth - an outstanding Austrian writer, classic of world literature of the 20th century, author of famous novels, a genius and holy drunkard - singer of the Habsburg idyll with its multicultural diversity and tolerance.  Joseph Roth was born in Galicia, in the town of Brody (now the administrative center of the Lviv region, Ukraine) on September 2, 1894. The population of Brod, which belonged to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, was three-quarters Jewish, and a quarter consisted of Ukrainians, Poles and Germans. Roth did not know his father: soon after his marriage, he went mad and ended up in a hospital. The mother protected her only son from shameful misfortune. Barely literate, she made every effort to raise and educate the boy. Thanks to his mother, Moses, Joseph studied not in a community Jewish school, but in a citywide one. Teaching was conducted mainly in German, the knowledge of which gave hope for future success. In addition, Roth studied Polish (without zeal) and Hebrew. Then he entered the gymnasium named after Crown Prince Rudolf, where he became interested in literature, the poetry of Heinrich Heine. In 1913, Roth became a student at Lvov University. Dependence on the rich brother of his mother, in whose house he lived, oppressed him. The following year, Joseph Roth moved to the capital and entered the University of Vienna. The literary talent of the young philologist-Germanist was revealed during the First World War. He writes and publishes in the periodical press of the Austrian capital the stories "An Exemplary Student" (1916) and "Barbara" (1918), numerous poems. In 1916, student Roth unexpectedly interrupted his studies and volunteered for the army. How could they explain this amazing act: and unexpectedly awakened patriotism, and curiosity! As a twenty-year-old recruit, the future creator of the Radetzky March stood in a cordon at the funeral of Emperor Franz Joseph and sobbed, realizing that not just an old man who had outlived his time, but an era was buried in the crypt of the Capuchins. The unit in which Roth served was located in the swamps of Galicia, not far from the writer`s native places. He ended up not on the front line, but in the divisional press service. In December 1918, he again found himself in Vienna, but did not continue his studies. He went into journalism: by his own admission, "out of despair and out of idleness." He was published in the left-wing radical press, especially often in the Vienna “Der Neue Tag.” In the early 1920s, Roth was close to the Socialist Party of Austria and the Social Democratic Party of Germany, collaborated in their leading bodies, defended the Weimar republic, but also criticized it from the left, rightly reproaching it for indifference to the victims of the war. He and the German intelligentsia got it from him - for revanchism, militaryism, national arrogance, craving for the irrational and mystical. Under his "glosses" in the Social Democratic press was often signed - "Red Josef" or "Red Roth" (Der rote Roth) .After 1923, the radical left aggressiveness of the Red Roth began to decline: he willingly collaborates in publications of a moderate liberal wing - "Frankfurter Zeitung", "Berliner Bersen-kurir", “Prager Tagtblatt," however, did not hide his leftist convictions. In the early post-war years, Roth did not separate himself from the intellectual life of both republics that emerged on the ruins of empires. face - Austrian and Weimar. Moreover, he was more willing to collaborate in Berlin publications than in Vienna, perhaps because Germany, with its spirit of nationalist militarism, provided more material for satire. Roth`s first novel "The Web" (1923) was published with sequels in the Viennese socialist "Arbeiter Zeitung", and a separate edition came out only many years after the death of the author, in 1967. The editorial offices of newspapers and magazines competed with each other for the right to publish Rotovsk materials. As a highly paid journalist, Roth did not get out of debt, lived in hotels, and did not have his own home. Chronic alcoholism was the main cause of poverty. In France, where he worked for quite a long time as a correspondent for the Frankfurter Zeitung, he felt much better, but upon his return to Germany the blues and binges began with renewed vigor. Roth, with enviable persistence, begins to seek a journalistic trip to the USSR, to Soviet Russia, with which he still pinned hopes for a reorganization of the world acceptable to him. This business trip (summer and early autumn of 1926) was a life and creative milestone for him, it was the beginning of a deep inner turning point. He personally saw not only Russia, his path lay through Warsaw and Minsk to Moscow, from there he made a long voyage, visiting Nizhny Novgorod, Kazan, Samara, Samarkand, Astrakhan, Baku, Tbilisi, Odessa, and through Ukraine returned to Moscow, after which I also visited in Leningrad. Visiting Lviv more than once in the 1920s and later 30s (Roth was invited by his Polish colleagues as one of the most popular and more often other authors translated and published in interwar Poland), he tried to state the inviolability of "that still world", the Habsburg idyll , multicultural diversity and tolerance. Returning to Berlin or later to Paris, he talked and wrote about the increase in scars, about the almost complete healing of wounds, the untying of knots, the self-regeneration of culture in Galicia. In the winter of 1937, Roth came to Lvov for the last time. “I assure you, friends, that we are attending the last of such holidays in Europe,” he addressed the selected Lviv society, not without the influence of alcohol and awakened forebodings. Not all of those present wanted to believe him. The reasons for the death of 45-year-old Joseph Roth are most often cited as alcoholism and nostalgia - the former, obviously, stemmed from the latter, and vice versa. The writer nurtured both diseases in himself, at one time, even before the great disintegration of 1914-1918, choosing for himself the fate of an emigrant, a traveler to the West and a hotel recluse, and also making escape his permanent state. The real cause of death was premonitions - the catastrophe should begin immediately after the summer, in some ninety-three days. Then there was the Holocaust, the factories of death, the tragedy of Central Europe - all at once together with the war, from which his heart of a holy drunkard would have burst all the same.