The Child Who Never Grew

The Child Who Never Grew by Pearl S. Buck

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Pearl S. Buck’s groundbreaking memoir, hailed by James Michener as “spiritually moving,” about raising a child with a rare developmental disorder.

The Child Who Never Grew is Buck’s candid memoir of her relationship with her oldest daughter, who was born with a rare type of mental retardation. A forerunner of its kind, the memoir was published in 1950 and helped demolish the cruel taboos surrounding learning disabilities. Buck describes life with her daughter, Carol, whose special needs led Buck to send her to one of the best schools for disabled children in the United States — which she paid for in part by writing The Good Earth, her multimillion-selling classic novel. Brave and touching, The Child Who Never Grew is a heartrending memoir of parenting. As Buck writes, “I learned respect and reverence for every human mind. It was my child who taught me to understand so clearly that all people are equal in their humanity and that all have the same human rights.”

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Pearl S. Buck

A book by Pearl S. Buck

BAK (Buck), Pearl (English Pearl S ydenstricker Buck ; Chinese name 赛珍珠, Sai Zhenzhu). June 26, 1892 - March 6, 1973 American writer Pearl Comfort (Seidenstreaker) Buck was the daughter of Presbyterian missionaries in China, the only child of six born in the United States in Hillsborough, West Virginia. Her father, Absalom Seidenstreaker, was a stern, introverted scholar who devoted many years to translating the Bible from Greek into Chinese. Her mother, née Caroline Stalting, was a highly educated, cultured woman who traveled a lot in her youth and loved literature very much. The parents returned to China when Pearl was still a child and settled in Chinkyan, preferring to live among the Chinese rather than in areas of the country that were predominantly occupied by foreigners. As a result, the girl learned to speak Chinese earlier than English. In addition, she was so well received by her Chinese peers that she did not feel like a foreigner in China until she was nine. When the "boxing uprising" began and the empress ordered the execution of all whites, the Seidenstreakers fled to Shanghai, but after the uprising was suppressed, they returned to Chinkyan again. Pearl was originally educated by her mother and a Chinese mentor who was a Confucian scholar. At the age of 15, the girl was sent to a boarding house in Shanghai. In 1910 she returned to the United States and entered the Randolph-Manson Women`s College in Virginia, where she studied psychology and received two literary awards. After graduating from college in 1914, she returned to China to work as a teacher in the Presbyterian Mission, and three years later married John Lossing Buck, an agricultural specialist who also served as a missionary in China. The young couple settles in one of the northern villages, where B.

continues to teach, and also acts as a translator for her husband while traveling in the countryside. In 1921, their daughter Carol is born, and a few months later, Pearl`s mother dies, and the future writer decides to write her biography. By this time, the B.

family moved to Nanjing, where John teaches agricultural sciences at the local university, and Pearl teaches English and American literature. B.

began to write in childhood; her first literary experiences appeared in a children`s supplement to the English-language newspaper Shanghai Mercury. After completing his mother`s biography, which was published much later, B.

takes up the novel, and in the early 20`s. the Atlantic Monthly and other American magazines publish her articles on China. After returning to the United States for a year, the Buck couple attend graduate school at Cornell University, where Pearl earns her Master of Arts in Literature. By this time, the Buck couple learn from the doctors that their daughter is mentally retarded, and decide to adopt another girl, Janice. When the Bucks returned to China in 1927, civil war was raging in the country. The house in Nanjing turned out to be looted, and the manuscript of B.`s first novel disappeared.

In the same year, B.`s family was evacuated - first to Shanghai, and then to Japan. By this time B.

finished her second novel, "East Wind: West Wind", which she began to write on a steamer on the way from the United States to China, and which was published in 1930 " East Wind ...

"is a completely traditional love story, which also touches on the problem of" fathers and children.

" The novel takes place in China at the turn of the century, its heroes are ordinary Chinese, whose life B.

knew very well from early childhood. Although the novel was initially rejected by publishers on the grounds that the reading public would hardly develop an interest in the life of China, The East Wind ...

went through three editions in a short time. Then, in 1931, appeared the novel "The Earth" ("The Good Earth"), for which B.

was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. This book, which is still considered the best work of B., tells the story of the attempt of a poor peasant family to achieve prosperity and create something like a family dynasty. The novel is distinguished by the simple style that is characteristic of all of B.`s work and is comparable, according to one of the critics, with the biblical one. "Earth" quickly became a bestseller, which was called "the parable of human life." This novel dates back to the tradition of Chinese folk literature, whose cyclical form reflects a belief in the continuity of life and is intended for the entertainment of the common people. Continuation of "Earth" were two more novels - "Sons" ("Sons", 1932) and "Divided House" ("A House Divided", 1935). All three novels were published in 1935 in one volume under the title "The House of Earth". In these early years of his literary career B.

wrote a lot: the novel "Mother" ("Mother", 1934), biographies of the mother "Exile" ("The Exile", 1936) and father "Fighting Angel" ("Fighting Angel", 1936), The Proud Heart, the first book to be set in America, a translation of the two-volume classic Chinese novel Shui-hu Huang, published in 1933 and entitled All Men are Brothers ( All Men Are Brothers). In 1938, Mr ..

B.

becomes the first American writer to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature "for a multifaceted, truly epic description of the life of Chinese peasants and for biographical masterpieces." In his welcoming speech, the representative of the Swedish Academy, Per Hallström, summarized the themes of the most significant works of B., which, as he put it, “pave the way for human understanding despite any racial barriers and allow the study of universal human ideals, which constitute an eternally living subject of artistic creativity”. “This award will inspire not only me, but all American writers,” said B.

when presenting the award. “The awarding of the Nobel Prize to a woman in our country is of great importance.” B.

also expressed deep gratitude to the Chinese people, whose life for many years has been closely connected with her own. The award of B.

Nobel Prize caused lively controversy among critics, some of whom argued that the work of B., a writer, undoubtedly talented and interesting, is not large enough for such a prize. Nevertheless, B.`s books continued to enjoy immense popularity, the writer`s creative activity did not dry out. For forty years she has written eighty works: novels, biographies, autobiography, radio plays, books for children. However, the peak of her work remained "Earth", after receiving the Nobel Prize, her reputation began to gradually decline, the didacticism and sentimentality characteristic of her books were striking. According to some critics, B.

deserves more attention as a humanist, a fighter for "one world" than as an artist. Disputes about her work continued: such critics. how Kenneth Tynen stood up for her and praised the level of her books; others, such as George Steiner, have argued equally convincingly. In 1935, Mr ..

B.

divorced her first husband and married his publisher Richard Walsh, with whom they took on the upbringing of several children. The couple were active members of the East-West Association for cultural relations, as well as the Welkam House charity, which provided material assistance to all those who wanted to adopt children of Asian-American descent. The writer donated savings to the Pearl Buck Foundation for various charitable and educational purposes. B.

died at the age of eighty in Danby, Vermont, having outlived Walsh by nearly thirteen years. In addition to the Nobel Prize, the writer was awarded the William Dean Howells Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1935), as well as numerous humanitarian awards, honorary degrees from Yale University, West Virginia University, Howard University. Philadelphia Women`s Medical College and other institutions of higher education. In 1951, Mr ..

B.

was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

The Child Who Never Grew PDF

BAK (Buck), Pearl (English Pearl S ydenstricker Buck ; Chinese name 赛珍珠, Sai Zhenzhu). June 26, 1892 - March 6, 1973 American writer Pearl Comfort (Seidenstreaker) Buck was the daughter of Presbyterian missionaries in China, the only child of six born in the United States in Hillsborough, West Virginia. Her father, Absalom Seidenstreaker, was a stern, introverted scholar who devoted many years to translating the Bible from Greek into Chinese. Her mother, née Caroline Stalting, was a highly educated, cultured woman who traveled a lot in her youth and loved literature very much. The parents returned to China when Pearl was still a child and settled in Chinkyan, preferring to live among the Chinese rather than in areas of the country that were predominantly occupied by foreigners. As a result, the girl learned to speak Chinese earlier than English. In addition, she was so well received by her Chinese peers that she did not feel like a foreigner in China until she was nine. When the "boxing uprising" began and the empress ordered the execution of all whites, the Seidenstreakers fled to Shanghai, but after the uprising was suppressed, they returned to Chinkyan again. Pearl was originally educated by her mother and a Chinese mentor who was a Confucian scholar. At the age of 15, the girl was sent to a boarding house in Shanghai. In 1910 she returned to the United States and entered the Randolph-Manson Women`s College in Virginia, where she studied psychology and received two literary awards. After graduating from college in 1914, she returned to China to work as a teacher in the Presbyterian Mission, and three years later married John Lossing Buck, an agricultural specialist who also served as a missionary in China. The young couple settles in one of the northern villages, where B. continues to teach, and also acts as a translator for her husband while traveling in the countryside. In 1921, their daughter Carol is born, and a few months later, Pearl`s mother dies, and the future writer decides to write her biography. By this time, the B. family moved to Nanjing, where John teaches agricultural sciences at the local university, and Pearl teaches English and American literature. B. began to write in childhood; her first literary experiences appeared in a children`s supplement to the English-language newspaper Shanghai Mercury. After completing his mother`s biography, which was published much later, B. takes up the novel, and in the early 20`s. the Atlantic Monthly and other American magazines publish her articles on China. After returning to the United States for a year, the Buck couple attend graduate school at Cornell University, where Pearl earns her Master of Arts in Literature. By this time, the Buck couple learn from the doctors that their daughter is mentally retarded, and decide to adopt another girl, Janice. When the Bucks returned to China in 1927, civil war was raging in the country. The house in Nanjing turned out to be looted, and the manuscript of B.`s first novel disappeared. In the same year, B.`s family was evacuated - first to Shanghai, and then to Japan. By this time B. finished her second novel, "East Wind: West Wind", which she began to write on a steamer on the way from the United States to China, and which was published in 1930 " East Wind ... "is a completely traditional love story, which also touches on the problem of" fathers and children. " The novel takes place in China at the turn of the century, its heroes are ordinary Chinese, whose life B. knew very well from early childhood. Although the novel was initially rejected by publishers on the grounds that the reading public would hardly develop an interest in the life of China, The East Wind ... went through three editions in a short time. Then, in 1931, appeared the novel "The Earth" ("The Good Earth"), for which B. was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. This book, which is still considered the best work of B., tells the story of the attempt of a poor peasant family to achieve prosperity and create something like a family dynasty. The novel is distinguished by the simple style that is characteristic of all of B.`s work and is comparable, according to one of the critics, with the biblical one. "Earth" quickly became a bestseller, which was called "the parable of human life." This novel dates back to the tradition of Chinese folk literature, whose cyclical form reflects a belief in the continuity of life and is intended for the entertainment of the common people. Continuation of "Earth" were two more novels - "Sons" ("Sons", 1932) and "Divided House" ("A House Divided", 1935). All three novels were published in 1935 in one volume under the title "The House of Earth". In these early years of his literary career B. wrote a lot: the novel "Mother" ("Mother", 1934), biographies of the mother "Exile" ("The Exile", 1936) and father "Fighting Angel" ("Fighting Angel", 1936), The Proud Heart, the first book to be set in America, a translation of the two-volume classic Chinese novel Shui-hu Huang, published in 1933 and entitled All Men are Brothers ( All Men Are Brothers). In 1938, Mr .. B. becomes the first American writer to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature "for a multifaceted, truly epic description of the life of Chinese peasants and for biographical masterpieces." In his welcoming speech, the representative of the Swedish Academy, Per Hallström, summarized the themes of the most significant works of B., which, as he put it, “pave the way for human understanding despite any racial barriers and allow the study of universal human ideals, which constitute an eternally living subject of artistic creativity”. “This award will inspire not only me, but all American writers,” said B. when presenting the award. “The awarding of the Nobel Prize to a woman in our country is of great importance.” B. also expressed deep gratitude to the Chinese people, whose life for many years has been closely connected with her own. The award of B. Nobel Prize caused lively controversy among critics, some of whom argued that the work of B., a writer, undoubtedly talented and interesting, is not large enough for such a prize. Nevertheless, B.`s books continued to enjoy immense popularity, the writer`s creative activity did not dry out. For forty years she has written eighty works: novels, biographies, autobiography, radio plays, books for children. However, the peak of her work remained "Earth", after receiving the Nobel Prize, her reputation began to gradually decline, the didacticism and sentimentality characteristic of her books were striking. According to some critics, B. deserves more attention as a humanist, a fighter for "one world" than as an artist. Disputes about her work continued: such critics. how Kenneth Tynen stood up for her and praised the level of her books; others, such as George Steiner, have argued equally convincingly. In 1935, Mr .. B. divorced her first husband and married his publisher Richard Walsh, with whom they took on the upbringing of several children. The couple were active members of the East-West Association for cultural relations, as well as the Welkam House charity, which provided material assistance to all those who wanted to adopt children of Asian-American descent. The writer donated savings to the Pearl Buck Foundation for various charitable and educational purposes. B. died at the age of eighty in Danby, Vermont, having outlived Walsh by nearly thirteen years. In addition to the Nobel Prize, the writer was awarded the William Dean Howells Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1935), as well as numerous humanitarian awards, honorary degrees from Yale University, West Virginia University, Howard University. Philadelphia Women`s Medical College and other institutions of higher education. In 1951, Mr .. B. was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.