Loop

Loop by 12106

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Learn the final truth about the Ring!

In this much-awaited conclusion of the Ring trilogy, everything you thought you knew about the story will have to be put side. In Loop, the killer mimics both AIDS and cancer in a deadly new guise. Kaoru Futami, a youth mature beyond his years, must hope to find answers in the deserts of New Mexico and the Loop project, a virtual matrix created by scientists. The fate of more than just his loved ones depends on Kaoru`s success.

Loop is written as a stand-alone work though it is best enjoyed by fans of Ring and Spiral. The author`s own favorite of the trilogy, this astounding finale is an emotionally resonant tale that scales conceptual heights from an angle all its own. Fiction about fiction has rarely been so gripping.


Review

Loop is a Suzuki masterpiece and will shake you to your core whether you like it or not.”

— Book Magazine (Japan)

“[Suzuki] does not disappoint… Loop satisfies better than the original or its sequel when you want real answers.”

— bookslut.com

“High-flying science-fictional redefinition of reality… [Suzuki] is more interested in separating your head from your body philosophically than physically.”

— The Agony Column
About the Author

Koji Suzuki was born in 1957 in Hamamatsu, southwest of Tokyo. He attended Keio University where he majored in French. After graduating he held numerous odd jobs, including a stint as a cram school teacher. Also a self-described jock, he holds a first-class yachting license and crossed the U.S., from Key West to Los Angeles, on his motorcycle.

The father of two daughters, Suzuki is a respected authority on childrearing and has written numerous works on the subject. He acquired his expertise when he was a struggling writer and househusband. Suzuki also has translated a children`s book into Japanese, The Little Sod Diaries by the crime novelist Simon Brett.

In 1990, Suzuki`s first full-length work, Paradise won the Japanese Fantasy Novel Award and launched his career as a fiction writer. Ring, written with a baby on his lap, catapulted him to fame, and the multi-million selling sequels Spiral and Loop cemented his reputation as a world-class talent. Often called the "Stephen King of Japan," Suzuki has played a crucial role in establishing mainstream credentials for horror novels in his country. He is based in Tokyo but loves to travel, often in the United States. Birthday is his sixth novel to appear in English.

276 pages, published in
12106

A book by 12106

Writer Koji Suzuki (born May 13, 1957) graduated from Keio University of Japan with a degree in French literature. His debut novel Rakuen (1990) won the Japan Fantasy Novel Award. Popular TV shows and films are being shot based on the trilogy of Suzuki`s bestsellers - "Ring" (1991), "Ring-2" (1994) and "Ring-3" (1998). In addition to the aforementioned novels, Suzuki wrote The Walk of the Gods (2003), as well as the collection of stories Dark Waters (1996) and Ring-0 (Birth) (1999). The writer is currently working on a new horror novel. In addition, he is also interested in literature for children: he translates books by English-speaking authors into Japanese. In Japan, it has been believed since ancient times that the best time to meet ghosts is deep night. If it is raining, the chances of seeing a ghost are even higher. "Walking along a river or pond, you can experience ghosts being born," says writer Koji Suzuki. In his opinion, spirits or ghosts often come into confined ...

Loop PDF

Writer Koji Suzuki (born May 13, 1957) graduated from Keio University of Japan with a degree in French literature. His debut novel Rakuen (1990) won the Japan Fantasy Novel Award. Popular TV shows and films are being shot based on the trilogy of Suzuki`s bestsellers - "Ring" (1991), "Ring-2" (1994) and "Ring-3" (1998). In addition to the aforementioned novels, Suzuki wrote The Walk of the Gods (2003), as well as the collection of stories Dark Waters (1996) and Ring-0 (Birth) (1999). The writer is currently working on a new horror novel. In addition, he is also interested in literature for children: he translates books by English-speaking authors into Japanese. In Japan, it has been believed since ancient times that the best time to meet ghosts is deep night. If it is raining, the chances of seeing a ghost are even higher. "Walking along a river or pond, you can experience ghosts being born," says writer Koji Suzuki. In his opinion, spirits or ghosts often come into confined wet spaces. So, in the cinematic version of the novel "The Bell" - the spirit of Sadako dwells at the well; in the collection of stories "Dark Waters", based on which the film of the same name was filmed, meetings with the restless also take place against the background of water. The Japanese associate ghosts with moisture rather than dryness. Even in Western horror movies, the creepiness often happens in the bathroom. The audience of Japanese horror shivers with fear when they see a humid and stuffy place - an disembodied ghost may appear there. In The Ring, the spirit enters the world through a videotape. The main character worries about her child, and the reader watches with growing horror as the spirit approaches them. The horror in The Bell is realistic and tangible, because the point of contact with the world of spirits becomes an everyday object. Such decisions are typical for Japanese horror, but it was Suzuki`s work that sparked the popularity of this art throughout the world. Interestingly, the writer himself denies personal acquaintance with the spirits and claims that he does not believe in them - moreover, he does not even watch horror films. “I`m a pretty logical person,” says Suzuki. - I do not believe in any ephemeral entities and am not interested in them. I rarely read horror novels and do not watch horror, except for "Psychosis" by Hitchcock, "The Exorcist" and a couple of other similar films. It seems to me that in my early works, the vision of the world is somewhat reminiscent of the views of prehistoric hunters: you need to overcome difficulties and achieve fame. In "Call" I moved away from this. If you read my trilogy, you will see that they do not belong to the typical horror with a hopeless and hopeless ending, when the ghost, who was considered defeated, returns. I wrote these novels in a different way. Horror is not mine, there is a big difference between me and an ordinary horror writer. " Suzuki doesn`t like traditional horror movies with horror ghosts, fountains of blood, and cheap sound effects. He doesn`t even consider them scary. "In my opinion, bloody," meat "horror films are suitable only for children, - says the writer. - Children believe in them. But the imagination of an adult stimulates only real, genuine fear. In America and Europe, in almost all horror films, evil spirits are defeated. Japanese horror films end with a hint that the spirit is free. The fact is that for the Japanese, spirits are not only enemies, they coexist with our world. In Japanese literature, ghosts are common: think of Zunichiro Tanizaki, Naoya Shiga, or Soseki Natsume`s Dream Nights. These works do not belong to the genre of horror, although they cause the reader to tremble. In my new novel, fear has nothing to do with perfume, it is more modern. I feel it myself and hope to convey it to the readers. This fear is mixed with excitement, when the hands are shaking, the heart is pounding, and the pulse is fast. " “I would really like that after the films“ Ring ”and“ Ring-2 ”they made a film based on the novel“ Ring-3, ”admits Suzuki,“ and finish the trilogy. It is great that all three books have been translated and are available to a wider readership. After all, the main thing is books. Films are good only insofar as they introduce people to books. If there is ever a film about the sea based on the novel Rakuen in Hollywood, I will be happy. " The book "Rakuen" tells the story of a man who overcomes difficulties in order to win the heart of his beloved girl. According to Suzuki, this plot is the best fit for a Hollywood movie. What is Koji Suzuki dreaming of? To make a "human drama" based on a Japanese horror novel in Hollywood.