The Big Bounce

The Big Bounce by Walter Tevis

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Walter Tevis

A book by Walter Tevis

Walter Tevis (full name - Walter Stone Tevis / Walter Stone Tevis, sometimes indicated with the prefix jr.

(Junior)) is an American writer, author of novels and short stories. Several famous films have been made based on his books. Tevis was born on February 28, 1928 in San Francisco (California) and grew up in the Sunset area, near the seaside and the famous Golden Gate Park. At the age of ten, his parents had to send him to the Stanford Children`s Sanatorium for a year, and they themselves went to Madison County, Kentucky, where the family received a land plot. When Walter was eleven, he himself came by train to his family across the country. At the end of World War II, 17-year-old Tevis served in the Pacific as a carpenter`s assistant aboard the USS Hamilton. After leaving school in 1945, he graduated from high school and entered the University of Kentucky, where he received his BA and MA in English literature. He studied with A.B.

Guthrie, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Big Sky. During his studies, Tevis worked part-time in the billiard room and even wrote a story about billiards for classes with Guthrie. After graduating from university, Tevis worked in the Kentucky Highway Administration and taught subjects ranging from science and English to physical education in provincial schools in the state. In 1957 he married Jamie Griggs, with whom he lived for twenty-seven years. Following Collier`s 1955 billiard short story, The Big Hustle, Tevis had short stories in Cosmopolitan, Esquire, Galaxy Science Fiction, Playboy, Redbook, and Saturday Evening Post ". Tevis`s first novel ("The Hustler") was published in 1959, followed in 1963 by "The Man Who Fell to Earth". From 1965 to 1978 Tevis taught English Literature and Creative Writing at Ohio University. Three of Tevis`s six novels have been used in films of the same name. In "Hustler" (in the Russian box office "King of Billiards") and "Color of Money" ("The Color of Money") are the adventures of the fictional billiard-swindler Felson, nicknamed Fast Eddie. The Man Who Fell to Earth was filmed (The Man Who Fell to Earth) in 1976 by director Nicholas Rogue and also in 1987 as a TV movie. At Ohio University, Tevis noticed that student literacy had plummeted. This observation formed the basis of the novel "Mockingbird" (1980), which is set in the dark, decadent New York of the XXV century. The population is decreasing, people have forgotten how to read and use drugs. Humanity, which is close to extinction, is ruled by robots. In 1980, for this novel, Tevis was nominated for "Nebula". In a recent TV interview, the writer said that the US State Broadcasting Service planned to make a film based on "Mockingbird" as a sequel to the dystopian film "Heavenly Cutter" (filmed in 1979 based on the novel of the same name by W.

Le Guin). Here is how science fiction writer James Sullis spoke of The Man Who Fell to Earth in the Boston Globe: “At first glance, this is the story of an alien who arrives on Earth to save his own civilization, but encounters obstacles and loses faith in yourself ("I want ...

but not enough"). If you look closely, you can see in the novel a parable about the Cold War and the conservatism of the fifties. Tevis himself called it "a very veiled autobiography" about how he was transported as a child from San Francisco, "the city of light", to the countryside of Kentucky, about a childhood illness that left him bedridden and away from his family for a long time. It was only after writing the novel that Tevis realized that he had talked about how he became an alcoholic. This is a portrait of the artist, and a Christian allegory, and, finally, one of the saddest books that I know - a funeral lament for the great aspirations that have failed, a picture of absolute and hopeless loneliness.

" After becoming a member of the American Writers `Union of Writers` Guild, Tevis spent the last years of his life in New York, where he devoted himself entirely to writing books and stories. In 1984, the writer died of lung cancer and was buried in Richmond, Kentucky. U.

Tevis`s works have been translated into French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovak, Serbian, Croatian, Hebrew, Japanese and Thai. In 2003, Jamie Griggs Tevis published her autobiography My Life with the Hustler. Official site http://www.waltertevis.com/ Taken from the site http://fantlab.ru/

The Big Bounce PDF

Walter Tevis (full name - Walter Stone Tevis / Walter Stone Tevis, sometimes indicated with the prefix jr. (Junior)) is an American writer, author of novels and short stories. Several famous films have been made based on his books. Tevis was born on February 28, 1928 in San Francisco (California) and grew up in the Sunset area, near the seaside and the famous Golden Gate Park. At the age of ten, his parents had to send him to the Stanford Children`s Sanatorium for a year, and they themselves went to Madison County, Kentucky, where the family received a land plot. When Walter was eleven, he himself came by train to his family across the country. At the end of World War II, 17-year-old Tevis served in the Pacific as a carpenter`s assistant aboard the USS Hamilton. After leaving school in 1945, he graduated from high school and entered the University of Kentucky, where he received his BA and MA in English literature. He studied with A.B. Guthrie, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Big Sky. During his studies, Tevis worked part-time in the billiard room and even wrote a story about billiards for classes with Guthrie. After graduating from university, Tevis worked in the Kentucky Highway Administration and taught subjects ranging from science and English to physical education in provincial schools in the state. In 1957 he married Jamie Griggs, with whom he lived for twenty-seven years. Following Collier`s 1955 billiard short story, The Big Hustle, Tevis had short stories in Cosmopolitan, Esquire, Galaxy Science Fiction, Playboy, Redbook, and Saturday Evening Post ". Tevis`s first novel ("The Hustler") was published in 1959, followed in 1963 by "The Man Who Fell to Earth". From 1965 to 1978 Tevis taught English Literature and Creative Writing at Ohio University. Three of Tevis`s six novels have been used in films of the same name. In "Hustler" (in the Russian box office "King of Billiards") and "Color of Money" ("The Color of Money") are the adventures of the fictional billiard-swindler Felson, nicknamed Fast Eddie. The Man Who Fell to Earth was filmed (The Man Who Fell to Earth) in 1976 by director Nicholas Rogue and also in 1987 as a TV movie. At Ohio University, Tevis noticed that student literacy had plummeted. This observation formed the basis of the novel "Mockingbird" (1980), which is set in the dark, decadent New York of the XXV century. The population is decreasing, people have forgotten how to read and use drugs. Humanity, which is close to extinction, is ruled by robots. In 1980, for this novel, Tevis was nominated for "Nebula". In a recent TV interview, the writer said that the US State Broadcasting Service planned to make a film based on "Mockingbird" as a sequel to the dystopian film "Heavenly Cutter" (filmed in 1979 based on the novel of the same name by W. Le Guin). Here is how science fiction writer James Sullis spoke of The Man Who Fell to Earth in the Boston Globe: “At first glance, this is the story of an alien who arrives on Earth to save his own civilization, but encounters obstacles and loses faith in yourself ("I want ... but not enough"). If you look closely, you can see in the novel a parable about the Cold War and the conservatism of the fifties. Tevis himself called it "a very veiled autobiography" about how he was transported as a child from San Francisco, "the city of light", to the countryside of Kentucky, about a childhood illness that left him bedridden and away from his family for a long time. It was only after writing the novel that Tevis realized that he had talked about how he became an alcoholic. This is a portrait of the artist, and a Christian allegory, and, finally, one of the saddest books that I know - a funeral lament for the great aspirations that have failed, a picture of absolute and hopeless loneliness. " After becoming a member of the American Writers `Union of Writers` Guild, Tevis spent the last years of his life in New York, where he devoted himself entirely to writing books and stories. In 1984, the writer died of lung cancer and was buried in Richmond, Kentucky. U. Tevis`s works have been translated into French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovak, Serbian, Croatian, Hebrew, Japanese and Thai. In 2003, Jamie Griggs Tevis published her autobiography My Life with the Hustler. Official site http://www.waltertevis.com/ Taken from the site http://fantlab.ru/