Wild : From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

Wild : From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed

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At twenty-two, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother’s death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life. With no experience or training, driven only by blind will, she would hike more than a thousand miles of the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State — and she would do it alone.

Told with suspense and style, sparkling with warmth and humor, Wild powerfully captures the terrors and pleasures of one young woman forging ahead against all odds on a journey that maddened, strengthened, and ultimately healed her.


literary awards

Oregon Book Award Nominee for Creative Nonfiction (Finalist) (2013),

Indies Choice Book Award for Adult Nonfiction (2013),

Puddly Award for Nonfiction (2013),

Goodreads Choice for Best Memoir & Autobiography (2012)

337 pages, published in
Cheryl Strayed

A book by Cheryl Strayed

Cheryl Strayed - American writer, memoirist, essayist and publicist. Born September 17, 1968 in Spangler, Pennsylvania. At the age of five, she moved with her family to Chaska, Minnesota. Her parents divorced a year later. When she was 13 years old, her mother and stepfather Glenn Lambrecht, sister Karen and brother Leif moved to Aitkin County, Minnesota, in a home they had built themselves on 40 acres of land they owned. There was no electricity or running water in the house for several years. The house was connected to the water supply after Cheryl entered college. In 1986, at the age of 17, Strayd graduated from McGregor High School in McGregor, Minnesota, where she practiced athletics and cheerleading. The fictional Coltrap County in Torch is based on her memories of McGregor and Aitkin County. Cheryl attended St. Thomas in Saint Paul, but in her sophomore year she transferred to the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, where she received her Bachelor of Arts. In March 1991, her mother, Bobby Lambrecht, died of lung cancer at the age of 45. Straid has described her death in each of her books and several essays. Straid has worked as a waitress, youth rights activist, political organizer, temporary office worker and nurse. In 2002 she received her Master of Fine Arts from Syracuse University, where she studied with writers such as George Sanders, Arthur Flowers and Mary Caponegro. In addition to Wild, Tiny Beautiful Things, and The Torch, Straid has published essays in various magazines including The Washington Post Magazine, The New York Times Magazine, Vogue, Allure, The Missouri Review, and The Sun Magazine. Her work has been twice selected for inclusion in The Best American Essays. She also received the Pushcart Prize for her essay "Munro Country" published in The Missouri Review. An essay on a letter Strayed received from Alice Munroe when she was a young author. She has hosted the popular advice column "Dear Sugar" at The Rumpus since 2010. Cheryl ran the column anonymously until February 14, 2012, when she introduced herself as "Sugar" at the "Coming Out Party" hosted by The Rumpus at the Verdi Club in San Francisco. Selected editions of her column have been published in the compilation Tiny Beautiful Things. Her memoir “Wild. Dangerous Journey as a Way to Find Me ”describes the 1,100-mile hike along the Pacific Ridge route from the Mojave Desert to the Oregon-Washington border, and also tells the story of the internal struggles that prompted her to do this. 3 months prior to publication, actress Reese Witherspoon acquired the film rights for her company, Pacific Standard. Nick Hornby adapted the book as a screenplay for the film, in which Witherspoon played Strade. In June 2012, Wild was selected for Oprah`s Book Club 2.0, which was the relaunch of Oprah`s Book Club ending in 2011.

Oprah`s Book Club 2.0 used social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Winfrey described Wild in the video announcing Oprah`s Book Club 2.0. Oprah interviewed Strade on the two-hour edition of her Super Soul Sunday show. In 1999, Straid married director Brian Lindstrom. They have a son, Carver and a daughter, Bobby, who live in Portland, Oregon.

Wild : From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail PDF

Cheryl Strayed - American writer, memoirist, essayist and publicist. Born September 17, 1968 in Spangler, Pennsylvania. At the age of five, she moved with her family to Chaska, Minnesota. Her parents divorced a year later. When she was 13 years old, her mother and stepfather Glenn Lambrecht, sister Karen and brother Leif moved to Aitkin County, Minnesota, in a home they had built themselves on 40 acres of land they owned. There was no electricity or running water in the house for several years. The house was connected to the water supply after Cheryl entered college. In 1986, at the age of 17, Strayd graduated from McGregor High School in McGregor, Minnesota, where she practiced athletics and cheerleading. The fictional Coltrap County in Torch is based on her memories of McGregor and Aitkin County. Cheryl attended St. Thomas in Saint Paul, but in her sophomore year she transferred to the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, where she received her Bachelor of Arts. In March 1991, her mother, Bobby Lambrecht, died of lung cancer at the age of 45. Straid has described her death in each of her books and several essays. Straid has worked as a waitress, youth rights activist, political organizer, temporary office worker and nurse. In 2002 she received her Master of Fine Arts from Syracuse University, where she studied with writers such as George Sanders, Arthur Flowers and Mary Caponegro. In addition to Wild, Tiny Beautiful Things, and The Torch, Straid has published essays in various magazines including The Washington Post Magazine, The New York Times Magazine, Vogue, Allure, The Missouri Review, and The Sun Magazine. Her work has been twice selected for inclusion in The Best American Essays. She also received the Pushcart Prize for her essay "Munro Country" published in The Missouri Review. An essay on a letter Strayed received from Alice Munroe when she was a young author. She has hosted the popular advice column "Dear Sugar" at The Rumpus since 2010. Cheryl ran the column anonymously until February 14, 2012, when she introduced herself as "Sugar" at the "Coming Out Party" hosted by The Rumpus at the Verdi Club in San Francisco. Selected editions of her column have been published in the compilation Tiny Beautiful Things. Her memoir “Wild. Dangerous Journey as a Way to Find Me ”describes the 1,100-mile hike along the Pacific Ridge route from the Mojave Desert to the Oregon-Washington border, and also tells the story of the internal struggles that prompted her to do this. 3 months prior to publication, actress Reese Witherspoon acquired the film rights for her company, Pacific Standard. Nick Hornby adapted the book as a screenplay for the film, in which Witherspoon played Strade. In June 2012, Wild was selected for Oprah`s Book Club 2.0, which was the relaunch of Oprah`s Book Club ending in 2011. Oprah`s Book Club 2.0 used social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Winfrey described Wild in the video announcing Oprah`s Book Club 2.0. Oprah interviewed Strade on the two-hour edition of her Super Soul Sunday show. In 1999, Straid married director Brian Lindstrom. They have a son, Carver and a daughter, Bobby, who live in Portland, Oregon.