The Reef

271 pages, published in
Edith Wharton

A book by Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton USA, 24.1.1861 - 11.8.1937 $$ author-portrait_14069-edith-wharton.jpg $$. .

$$ author-portrait_14069-edith_wharton1.jpg $$ Edith Wharton, author of over twenty novels and ten storybooks, is the first Pulitzer Prize-winning female writer. Such works by Wharton as "The Abode of Joy", "Ethan From", "The Age of Innocence", "Fruit of the Tree" were included in the golden fund of American literature. The novel "The Age of Innocence" formed the basis of the film of the same name by Martin Scorsese, which gained recognition and popularity. The confrontation between the individual and society, the clash of generally accepted moral principles and sincere deep feelings inevitably lead to tragedy, break human destinies. And not everyone has the courage to overcome the obstacles on the way to happiness and defend their love ....

*** An American writer who developed the principles of the psychological novel by Henry James in her work. She grew up in an aristocratic family of large owners, wrote her first novel at the age of 11, married a successful banker early, but the marriage was unsuccessful. Her closest friend was the lawyer Walter Berry, but their relationship never went beyond platonic. In 1899, the first collection of her stories was published; in 1903, their previous acquaintance with Henry James grew into a friendship that bound them until the end of their lives. Like him, she moved to Europe (1907), Paris became her second home. During the war, she took an active part in the activities of the Red Cross, helping orphans and refugees. The French government awarded her the Legion of Honor. The novel Age of Innocence, published in 1920, earned her the Pulitzer Prize. This is her most famous work, thanks in large part to the film adaptation of the same name by Martin Scorsese with Michelle Pfeiffer, Winona Ryder and Daniel Day-Lewis in the lead roles. She was considered a living classic when a new generation of writers emerged to become the glory of American literature. Scott Fitzgerald, who had just published The Great Gatsby, received a letter from her praising and inviting him to visit a villa near Paris. This tea party has become a legend. Before the meeting, both were nervous. Fitzgerald stopped several times at roadside restaurants along the way and arrived already well enough. Wharton tried to hide her awkwardness behind a mask of arrogance. After a few trivial phrases, Scott decided to tell the story of an American couple who spent three days in a Parisian brothel, which they mistook for a hotel. Stopping to make sure that he was at least able to shock the hostess, he heard: "But, Mr.

Fitzgerald, you did not tell us what they actually did in the brothel." The failure was complete. To one of the guests, Wharton said, "There must be something unusual about this young man," she wrote "Terrible" in her diary and did not invite him again. She died on August 11, 1937. © Diary of a lover of antiquity

The Reef PDF

Edith Wharton USA, 24.1.1861 - 11.8.1937 $$ author-portrait_14069-edith-wharton.jpg $$. . $$ author-portrait_14069-edith_wharton1.jpg $$ Edith Wharton, author of over twenty novels and ten storybooks, is the first Pulitzer Prize-winning female writer. Such works by Wharton as "The Abode of Joy", "Ethan From", "The Age of Innocence", "Fruit of the Tree" were included in the golden fund of American literature. The novel "The Age of Innocence" formed the basis of the film of the same name by Martin Scorsese, which gained recognition and popularity. The confrontation between the individual and society, the clash of generally accepted moral principles and sincere deep feelings inevitably lead to tragedy, break human destinies. And not everyone has the courage to overcome the obstacles on the way to happiness and defend their love .... *** An American writer who developed the principles of the psychological novel by Henry James in her work. She grew up in an aristocratic family of large owners, wrote her first novel at the age of 11, married a successful banker early, but the marriage was unsuccessful. Her closest friend was the lawyer Walter Berry, but their relationship never went beyond platonic. In 1899, the first collection of her stories was published; in 1903, their previous acquaintance with Henry James grew into a friendship that bound them until the end of their lives. Like him, she moved to Europe (1907), Paris became her second home. During the war, she took an active part in the activities of the Red Cross, helping orphans and refugees. The French government awarded her the Legion of Honor. The novel Age of Innocence, published in 1920, earned her the Pulitzer Prize. This is her most famous work, thanks in large part to the film adaptation of the same name by Martin Scorsese with Michelle Pfeiffer, Winona Ryder and Daniel Day-Lewis in the lead roles. She was considered a living classic when a new generation of writers emerged to become the glory of American literature. Scott Fitzgerald, who had just published The Great Gatsby, received a letter from her praising and inviting him to visit a villa near Paris. This tea party has become a legend. Before the meeting, both were nervous. Fitzgerald stopped several times at roadside restaurants along the way and arrived already well enough. Wharton tried to hide her awkwardness behind a mask of arrogance. After a few trivial phrases, Scott decided to tell the story of an American couple who spent three days in a Parisian brothel, which they mistook for a hotel. Stopping to make sure that he was at least able to shock the hostess, he heard: "But, Mr. Fitzgerald, you did not tell us what they actually did in the brothel." The failure was complete. To one of the guests, Wharton said, "There must be something unusual about this young man," she wrote "Terrible" in her diary and did not invite him again. She died on August 11, 1937. © Diary of a lover of antiquity