Nebula Awards Showcase 2018

Nebula Awards Showcase 2018 by David D. Levin

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The latest volume of the prestigious anthology series, published annually across six decades!

The Nebula Awards Showcase volumes have been published annually since 1966, reprinting the winning and nominated stories of the Nebula Awards, voted on by the members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA). The editor, selected by SFWA’s anthology Committee (chaired by Mike Resnick), is Jane Yolen, an author of children’s books, fantasy, and science fiction. This year’s Nebula Award winners are Charlie Jane Anders, Seanan McGuire, William Ledbetter, Amal El-Mohtar, and Eric Heisserer, with David D. Levine winning the Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy Book.

284 pages, published in
David D. Levin

A book by David D. Levin

David D.

Levine is an American writer who graduated from the Clarion West Writing Seminar and has published over 60 short stories, mostly in the science fiction genre. Before finally turning to science fiction literature, he wrote articles on various technical topics for some time. Born February 21, 1961 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. For a long time he was (and still is) an active participant in NF fandom, including the fact that together with his wife Katherine Lynn Yul published the fanzine "Bento"; also served on or chaired the Potlatch convention committee several times. He also composed filk-style parody songs, for example, about Babylon 5, or variations of the famous joke about replacing a light bulb - on the theme “how many different creations by Larry Niven are needed for this - puppeteers, kzinti, kdatlino and trinock”. Levin`s first story (by the way, also on a purely fandom theme, called "1992 The Worldcon that Wasn`t" ["1992: The Wor...

Nebula Awards Showcase 2018 PDF

David D. Levine is an American writer who graduated from the Clarion West Writing Seminar and has published over 60 short stories, mostly in the science fiction genre. Before finally turning to science fiction literature, he wrote articles on various technical topics for some time. Born February 21, 1961 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. For a long time he was (and still is) an active participant in NF fandom, including the fact that together with his wife Katherine Lynn Yul published the fanzine "Bento"; also served on or chaired the Potlatch convention committee several times. He also composed filk-style parody songs, for example, about Babylon 5, or variations of the famous joke about replacing a light bulb - on the theme “how many different creations by Larry Niven are needed for this - puppeteers, kzinti, kdatlino and trinock”. Levin`s first story (by the way, also on a purely fandom theme, called "1992 The Worldcon that Wasn`t" ["1992: The Worldcon That Wasn`t"]) appeared back in 1996, but the author came to the permanent publication of his works already in new millennium, since 2001. His stories have appeared primarily in various thematic anthologies, as well as in magazines such as Interzone, Realms of Fantasy, Asimov`s Science Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Some of them were later reprinted in the final collections of "the best of the year" from Gardner Dozois. Has taken part in many literary competitions such as Writers of the Future Contest (second place in 2001), Phobos (Phobos Fiction Contest; first place in 2002) and the Jim Baen Memorial Writing Contest; second place in 2010). In 2006, Levin`s short story "Tk`Tk`Tk" won the Hugo Prize, among other author`s awards, the Northern Ireland James White Prize. Also, his things have been nominated for the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Prize and Nebula more than once. In 2008, Wheatland Press published the first author`s collection of short stories, Space Magic, which won the Endeavor award. However, Levin does not intend to continue to write only in small form. After long attempts to attach manuscripts in various publishers, he finally managed to get his debut novel, Arabella of Mars, published. The book is written in the genre of "interplanetary steampunk" and is addressed to teenage readers. David Levin lives in Portland, Oregon. In 2016 he was widowed.