Vortex

Vortex by 14459

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Ben Tracey is having a well-deserved, restful week of birdwatching with his cousin, Annie. They`re keen to catch a glimpse of the rare, nearly extinct Hen Harrier — and their wish comes true, but not in the way they`d hoped as they witness a man in an RAF uniform shoot one of the beautiful birds dead. When, later that day, Ben and Annie meet an old man full of conspiracy theories about the nearby RAF training base they`re curious to know more and creep into the base — Spadeadam. But little do they know that they are in serious danger.Having walked into the middle of the real reason the Hen Harriers are being shot down, Ben and Annie are captured as intruders and taken to a secure unit on a deserted area of the camp. These birds are just helpless victims in a much bigger operation — they attract too many visitors to the area and there`s a top-secret piece of warfare technology being developed that needs to be kept quiet. If this weapon gets into the wrong hands it could have catastrophic worldwide effects. Can Ben and Annie get out in time to spread the news?

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14459

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Chris Ryan Chris Ryan was born in 1961 in a village near Newcastle. In 1984 he joined SAS. During those ten years of service in the regiment, he participated in open and covert operations, and was also a sniper of an anti-terrorist group. During the Gulf War, a British Special Forces (SAS) patrol mission, call sign B20 (Bravo Two Zero), ended in failure. The 8-man patrol was tasked with monitoring the main supply route, finding and destroying SCUD missiles, as well as communication channels. In the patrol, everything went awry from the very beginning - due to a navigation error, they were dropped off in the wrong place, the connection turned out to be inoperative, and later the patrol was found by the locals. The patrol had to hurry to the Syrian border, occasionally firing back at the Iraqis. The patrol was divided into two groups - 3 and 5 people. Ultimately, 3 people were killed, 4 were captured by the Iraqis, and one - Chris Ryan - managed to cross the border and hide in ...

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Chris Ryan Chris Ryan was born in 1961 in a village near Newcastle. In 1984 he joined SAS. During those ten years of service in the regiment, he participated in open and covert operations, and was also a sniper of an anti-terrorist group. During the Gulf War, a British Special Forces (SAS) patrol mission, call sign B20 (Bravo Two Zero), ended in failure. The 8-man patrol was tasked with monitoring the main supply route, finding and destroying SCUD missiles, as well as communication channels. In the patrol, everything went awry from the very beginning - due to a navigation error, they were dropped off in the wrong place, the connection turned out to be inoperative, and later the patrol was found by the locals. The patrol had to hurry to the Syrian border, occasionally firing back at the Iraqis. The patrol was divided into two groups - 3 and 5 people. Ultimately, 3 people were killed, 4 were captured by the Iraqis, and one - Chris Ryan - managed to cross the border and hide in Syria. Until now, the story is controversial. A few years after the events, the traveler and former SAS reserve soldier Michael Asher walked the patrol path with his own feet and discovered the darkness of discrepancies in the official version. Then he wrote the book "The Real Bravo Two Zero: The Truth Behind Bravo Two Zero", in which he questioned the actions of the patrol. So, here is the composition of that ill-fated patrol: Patrol commander Andy McNab , Andy McNab (pseudonym) - captured, later released. He currently works as a security consultant, author of several fiction and non-fiction books, including Bravo Two Zero.  Chris Ryan , Chris Ryan (alias) is the only patrol member who escaped capture. He is also currently working as a security consultant, author of several fiction and non-fiction books, including "The One That Got Away".  Ian Pring , Ian "Dinger" Pring (real name) - captured, later released.  Malcolm McGown , Malcolm `Stan / Mal` McGown - captured, later released.  Mike Coburn , Mike Coburn (pseudonym) - captured, later released.  Bob Consiglio , Bob Consiglio (real name) - died during combat mission Steve Lane , Steve `Legs` Lane (real name) - died of hypothermia while performing combat tasks Vincent Phillips , Vincent Phillips (real name) - died of hypothermia while performing a combat mission (There is unconfirmed information that there was a ninth person on the patrol, someone David Barnes , David Barnes (a pseudonym), who had a military rank higher than that of McNab, and who actually played a key role in rescuing the patrol. Barnes, however, categorically refused to have his name in any way associated with B20. he still serves in the army of Her Majesty. There is no confirmation of this information). http://tiomkin.livejournal.com/690342.html Background Iraq`s occupation and annexation of Kuwait in 1990 sparked widespread international outrage. Many countries of the world sent their national military contingents to the Multinational Force (MNF), which was protecting Saudi Arabia from possible Iraqi aggression and subsequently liberating Kuwait by military means in accordance with UN Security Council Resolution No. 678. The MNF also included the troops of a number of Arab states - Egypt, Syria, Morocco and the countries of the Arabian Peninsula. Immediately after the start of the military operation "Desert Storm" on January 17, 1991, Iraq launched a campaign of rocket attacks on the territory of Israel, a country that did not participate in any form in the MNF. It is assumed that Saddam Hussein hoped thereby to provoke a retaliatory strike by the Israelis, after which the Arab countries would most likely leave the MNF for ideological reasons. The attacks were carried out by Scud missiles, mainly from mobile launchers operating in the desolate western part of Iraq. The installations were moved in the dark, and during the day they were carefully camouflaged, which made their detection from the air extremely difficult. Since the issue was of great political importance, the MNF command allocated significant air forces to hunt for launchers, and Patriot anti-aircraft missile systems were deployed in Israel to intercept the Scuds in flight. The effectiveness of these steps turned out to be low, and then it was decided to use special forces units of the United States and Great Britain to detect installations and aim at them. One of the units tasked with finding the Scuds was a patrol from Squadron B of the 22nd Special Aviation Service (the patrol is the main tactical unit of the SAS and consists of 8 people) under the command of Sergeant Andy McNab (pseudonym). In addition, the patrol had to find and detonate fiber-optic communication lines laid along the Baghdad-Amman highway, which were used to transmit orders to the commanders of the launchers (conventional radio communications were completely jammed with interference from the coalition`s electronic warfare units). It was assumed that "Bravo-two-zero" will operate autonomously on enemy territory for 14 days.  In Iraq The Group was flown to the landing point by a British Chinook helicopter on the night of 22 January 1991. She successfully set up a base camp and surveyed the area. Very soon she faced a critical problem - a complete lack of communication with the command. As it turned out later, the group was mistakenly given the wrong radio frequencies, and radio communication became impossible. An attempt to communicate with airborne early warning aircraft (AWACS) using tactical beacons also failed. Then the patrol was discovered. The group hastily left the camp, but soon found itself involved in a battle with enemy forces (the scale of this clash remains debatable). When the patrol broke away from their pursuers, McNab decided to retreat west into Syria. It should be noted that during the planning of the operation, it was decided to retreat the patrol in case of an emergency to the south, to Saudi Arabia; thus, the change of direction doomed the search for the missing group to failure. On the way to the Syrian border, the main enemy of the patrol was the weather. The 1991 Gulf winter was its harshest in three decades. The group turned out to be ill-equipped for many hours of marches across the open plain in the cold, piercing wind and in the conditions of snow. The soldiers were physically exhausted, leading to the inadvertent division of the patrol into two squads when McNab tried again to contact AWACS through a tactical beacon during the night crossing. The soldier in front of him, due to fatigue, did not accept the command to stop, which was discovered too late. In the group that went ahead, there were three people, two of whom were in poor physical condition (one soldier had a twisted leg, the other suffered from dehydration). Four remained with McNab. Both groups were unable to find each other due to darkness and continued on their way to the Syrian border separately. The second group, led by Chris Ryan , lost one person to hypothermia. Another member was captured while trying to steal a car, and only Ryan managed to reach the border and crossed it safely on January 31. During the eight days of the retreat, Ryan was found to have covered 300 km on foot and lost 16 kg in weight; in the last two days he had no more water, and he began to experience hallucinations.  Historiography For the first time, the history of the patrol "Bravo Two Zero" was occasionally mentioned in the autobiography of Peter de la Billera, the former commander of British forces in the Persian Gulf. In 1993, Andy McNab`s book Bravo Two Zero was published, which became a bestseller. Chris Ryan (The Sole Survivor) and Mike Coburn (The Fifth Soldier) also wrote their books. Finally, Michael Asher, who did not participate in the patrol, but served in the SAS, traveled to Iraq after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein`s regime, tracked the path of the patrol on the spot and published the results of his research in the book True Bravo Two Zero. All four books dedicated to the fate of "Bravo-two-zero", to one degree or another, contradict each other. Most famous is the book by Patrol Commander McNab. In later books, McNab exaggerated the scale of the fighting the patrol was involved in, including the scale of the battle that followed after the group was first spotted. Ryan criticizes McNab`s actions as the patrol commander, as well as the behavior of Vincent Phillips, whom he blames for finding the group. Escher criticizes the work of both McNab and Ryan. In addition, the books by Escher and Coburn attempt to justify Phillips.  Wikipedia. Bravo Two Zero Based on the book by Chris Ryan, the movie "The One That Got Away" was shot by ITV in 1996. $$ author-portrait-14459-chris_ryan2.jpg $$ After rehabilitation, Chris Ryan continued to serve in the SAS, but did not participate in military operations, but was engaged in training recruits. He finally left the service in 1994. He wrote several books, not only documentary, but also fiction, incl. books for children. Took part in the preparation of a number of television programs, for example in 2005 the show "How not to die", which showed in detail how to act competently in various life-threatening situations, including violent burglaries, robberies and attacks on the street. He acted as a military advisor for the video game IGI-2: Covert Strike, helping to make the game more accurate in real-life military operations, tactics, weapons and equipment. Ryan has also produced several television programs titled "Terror Alert: Could You Survive," each showing how to survive a disaster, flood, nuclear terrorist attack, massive power outage or plane hijacking. He is a military consultant in the fight against terrorism and the organization of the protection of VIPs, currently working in the United States.  Official Website , Wikipedia , IMDb . $$ author-portrait-14459-chris_ryan3.jpg $$ Bibliography Series Geordie Sharp 1. Stand By, Stand By (1996) 2. Zero Option (1997) 3. The Kremlin Device (1998) 4. Tenth Man Down (1999) Zero Option / Stand By Stand By (omnibus) (2007) [ b] Alpha Force 1. Survival (2002) 2. Rat-Catcher (2002) 3. Desert Pursuit (2003) 4. Hostage (2003) 5. Red Center (2004) 6. Hunted (2004) 7. Blood Money (2005) 8. Fault Line (2005) 9. Black Gold (2005) 10. Untouchable (2005) Matt Browning 1. Greed (2003) 2. The Increment (2004) Code Red 1. Flash Flood (2006) 2. Wildfire (2007) 3. Outbreak (2007) 4. Vortex (2008) 5. Twister (2008) 6. Battleground (2009) Novels The Hit List (2000) The Watchman (2001) Land of Fire (2002) Blackout (2005) Ultimate Weapon (2006) Strike Back (2007) Firefight (2008) Who Dares Wins (2009) The Kill Zone (2010) Agent 21 (2010) Omnibus Kremlin Device / Watchmen (2007) Series contributed to Quick Reads 2008 One Good Turn? (2008) Non fiction The One That Got Away: My SAS Mission Behind Iraqi Lines (1995) Chris Ryan`s SAS Fitness Book (2001) Chris Ryan`s Ultimate Survival Guide (2003) Fight to Win: Deadly Skills of the Elite Forces (2009)