Eight Ghosts

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Rooted in place, slipping between worlds - a rich collection of unnerving ghosts and sinister histories. Eight authors were given after hours freedom at their chosen English heritage site. Immersed in the history, atmosphere and rumours of hauntings, they channelled their darker imaginings into a series of extraordinary new ghost stories. Sarah Perry`s intense tale of possession at the Jacobean country house Audley End is a work of psychological terror, while Andrew Michael Hurley`s story brings an unforgettably shocking slant to the history of Carlisle Castle. Within the walls of these historic buildings each author has found inspiration to deliver a new interpretation of the classic ghost story. Relish the imagined terrors at these exhilarating locations: Kate Clanchy, Housesteads Roman Fort Stuart Evers, Dover Castle Mark Haddon, York Cold War Bunker Andrew Michael Hurley, Carlisle Castle Sarah Perry, Audley End Max Porter Eltham Palace Kamila Shamsie, Kenilworth Castle Jeanette Winterson, Pendennis Castle

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14461

A book by 14461

Janet (Janet, Janet) Winterson (Winterson, Jeanette Winterson ) British writer and journalist. Born August 27, 1959 in Manchester, was adopted by a Pentecostal family who lived in Acrington, Lancashire. Her adoptive parents hoped that she would become a Christian missionary, and as a teenager she went door to door preaching. At 16, she told her parents that she was a lesbian and left home. While preparing for her high school graduation exams, she worked evenings and weekends. During the year before entering the university, she worked in a psychiatric hospital to earn money for her studies. After entering Oxford University, she studied English language and literature at St.

Catherine`s College. After she moved to London, her first autobiographical novel, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, was published when the author was 26 years old. The story was awarded the Whitebread Award for Best First Book in 1985, and Winterson`s screenplay was awarded the British Television Award (BA...

Eight Ghosts PDF

Janet (Janet, Janet) Winterson (Winterson, Jeanette Winterson ) British writer and journalist. Born August 27, 1959 in Manchester, was adopted by a Pentecostal family who lived in Acrington, Lancashire. Her adoptive parents hoped that she would become a Christian missionary, and as a teenager she went door to door preaching. At 16, she told her parents that she was a lesbian and left home. While preparing for her high school graduation exams, she worked evenings and weekends. During the year before entering the university, she worked in a psychiatric hospital to earn money for her studies. After entering Oxford University, she studied English language and literature at St. Catherine`s College. After she moved to London, her first autobiographical novel, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, was published when the author was 26 years old. The story was awarded the Whitebread Award for Best First Book in 1985, and Winterson`s screenplay was awarded the British Television Award (BAFT) for Best Television Performance in the Drama Genre. In 1987, her novel The Passion, set in Napoleonic Europe, was awarded another British Literary Prize, the John Llewelyn-Reese Prize. While Janet Winterson`s first novel was written in the genre of realism, her later works belong to the genre of magical realism and explore the boundaries of the physical and real world, sexual self-identification of the sexes. Winterson`s books have won several literary prizes. In 2006 she was awarded the Order of the British Empire for Literary Achievement.  Wikipedia , Official website .  Interview 10/28/2009 : You may never be able to grasp some things, but you have to tackle them because it`s yours. At least that`s how I feel. This is very important for me: I work with what is mine, with what cannot be taken away from me. Art for me is the only thing in which one cannot lie, in which it is useless to try to lie. After all, then the result will be something frozen, unnatural, it will no longer be a work of art, but some kind of object of lies, and that`s it. Thus, since art exists in order to tell the truth, accept it as it is and come on, tell the truth. Not the truth in an autobiographical sense, but the truth that has passed through your entire experience. In fact, I am not interested in anyone`s sexuality - neither living people, nor those in books. I need one thing - for this thing to have an effect. In my opinion, we are still too fixated on people`s sexual preferences. In fact, it’s not that interesting. The whole point of art is to make us wider, so that we are more, know more, understand more. Art places us in situations that we usually don`t have to get into. And this, of course, should also apply to sexuality. However, I have always been involved in such matters: I was a member of Friends of the Earth at the very beginning, I was a member of Greenpeace, and I still am. I have a very clear opinion on this. I think we shouldn`t wait for some other generation to come and do something - we have to play our part. My political activities are all connected with the environment, with the ecosystem, with how our food is produced. In the main, my position is as follows: I like the policy of specific deeds, but simply ranting about the tasks of society, about how to save the planet - this does not interest me. *** Writing dykes imitate the style of her early books as often as singing ones - Zemfira and Arbenina. But in addition to the confused (at times) syllable, floating time and indefinite gender, the lyrical hero (heroine) Winterson also has a serious cultural and historical baggage. And his step, in spite of this, is light. "Cryptography of the Flesh", or, more commonly called "Writings on the Body," is a love story. But not a tearful novel "for women", but rather a novel about a Woman. About a woman whom, unlike the narrator, we know to the millimeter, to the hollow, to the collarbones, shoulder blades and the content of white lymphocytes in her blood. It is noteworthy that in the original of the novel, Janet herself does not mention the gender of the narrator, therefore this novel was rather complicated for translation into Russian, as one of the translators Diana Oganova admits. However, whether the narrator / protagonist is male or female, this is not the point of the novel. The essence is in selfless love, in renunciation, loneliness, in doubts about the correctness of the chosen path - in everything that accompanies us every day, but only she, Janet Winterston, could describe this way.  Labrys