A General Theory of Oblivion

A General Theory of Oblivion by Jose Eduardo Agualuza

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The brilliant new novel from the winner of the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize.

On the eve of Angolan independence an agoraphobic woman named Ludo bricks herself into her apartment for 30 years, living off vegetables and the pigeons she lures in with diamonds, burning her furniture and books to stay alive and writing her story on the apartment’s walls.

Almost as if we’re eavesdropping, the history of Angola unfolds through the stories of those she sees from her window. As the country goes through various political upheavals from colony to socialist republic to civil war to peace and capitalism, the world outside seeps into Ludo’s life through snippets on the radio, voices from next door, glimpses of someone peeing on a balcony, or a man fleeing his pursuers.

A General Theory of Oblivion is a perfectly crafted, wild patchwork of a novel, playing on a love of storytelling and fable.

103 pages, published in
Jose Eduardo Agualuza

A book by Jose Eduardo Agualuza

José Eduardo Agualusa is a modern Angolan writer and journalist. Born December 13, 1960 in Huambo, Angola. For a long time, the writer lived in Lisbon, studying agronomy and forestry, then in Rio de Janeiro. Author of 10 novels, several collections of stories, published a collection of poems. The presentation of the tenth novel "General Theory of Oblivion" (Teoria Geral do Esquecimento) took place in May 2012. Collaborates as a freelance journalist for various newspapers and radio. Writes in Portuguese. Originally from Angolan Creoles, descendants of Portuguese settlers who settled in the country. Agualuza`s first novel was published in 1989 under the title A Conjura. This historical and artistic work depicts life in Luanda in 1880-1911, as well as the mutual influence of European and African cultures. In the short story A Feira dos Assombrados, the author explores the roots of Angolan nationalism. In his 1996 novel The Rainy Season (Estação das Chuvas), Agualuza uses autobiographical plot lines to describe modern Angolan society through decades of War of Independence and then Civil War. In all his prose works, the author uses both real and historical facts and fictional events. Apparently, the writer did not escape the influence of Latin American magical realism. The novel "Creole Civilization" (Nacao Crioula, 1997), awarded the Great Literary Prize of Portugal. In 2007, Agualuza became the first African author to receive the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize for his novel The Merchant of the Past (O Vendedor de Passados, 2004). In 2006 he founded the Brazilian publishing house Lingua Geral, which only publishes works by Portuguese-speaking writers. Lives in Angola, Brazil and Portugal.

A General Theory of Oblivion PDF

José Eduardo Agualusa is a modern Angolan writer and journalist. Born December 13, 1960 in Huambo, Angola. For a long time, the writer lived in Lisbon, studying agronomy and forestry, then in Rio de Janeiro. Author of 10 novels, several collections of stories, published a collection of poems. The presentation of the tenth novel "General Theory of Oblivion" (Teoria Geral do Esquecimento) took place in May 2012. Collaborates as a freelance journalist for various newspapers and radio. Writes in Portuguese. Originally from Angolan Creoles, descendants of Portuguese settlers who settled in the country. Agualuza`s first novel was published in 1989 under the title A Conjura. This historical and artistic work depicts life in Luanda in 1880-1911, as well as the mutual influence of European and African cultures. In the short story A Feira dos Assombrados, the author explores the roots of Angolan nationalism. In his 1996 novel The Rainy Season (Estação das Chuvas), Agualuza uses autobiographical plot lines to describe modern Angolan society through decades of War of Independence and then Civil War. In all his prose works, the author uses both real and historical facts and fictional events. Apparently, the writer did not escape the influence of Latin American magical realism. The novel "Creole Civilization" (Nacao Crioula, 1997), awarded the Great Literary Prize of Portugal. In 2007, Agualuza became the first African author to receive the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize for his novel The Merchant of the Past (O Vendedor de Passados, 2004). In 2006 he founded the Brazilian publishing house Lingua Geral, which only publishes works by Portuguese-speaking writers. Lives in Angola, Brazil and Portugal.