Classics: A Very Short Introduction

Classics: A Very Short Introduction by Mary Beard

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We are all classicists--we come into touch with the classics on a daily basis: in our culture, politics, medicine, architecture, language, and literature. What are the true roots of these influences, however, and how do our interpretations of these aspects of the classics differ from their original reality? This introduction to the classics begins with a visit to the British Museum to view the frieze which once decorated the Apollo Temple a Bassae. Through these sculptures John Henderson and Mary Beard prompt us to consider the significance of the study of Classics as a means of discovery and enquiry, its value in terms of literature, philosophy, and culture, its source of imagery, and the reasons for the continuation of these images into and beyond the twentieth century. Designed for the general reader and student alike, A Very Short Introduction to Classics challenges readers to adopt a fresh approach to the Classics as a major cultural influence, both in the ancient world and twentieth-century--emphasizing the continuing need to understand and investigate this enduring subject.

163 pages, published in
Mary Beard

A book by Mary Beard

Mary Beard / Winifred Mary Beard - British writer, antiquarian, Cambridge professor (since 2004). He is also the editor of the Antiquities section of The Times Literary Supplement (literary supplement of The Times), the author of the blog A Don`s Life, which is published as a regular column in The Times. Her frequent appearances to the media, and sometimes controversial public statements, earned her fame and the title of "England`s most famous antiquarian." Born January 1, 1955 in Mach Wenlock, Shropshire. Mary Beard studied at Direct grant grammar school . In the summer she took part in archaeological excavations - at first to earn money for recreation, but later unexpectedly began to take an interest in the study of antiquity. At the age of 18, Mary Beard was interviewed at Newnham College, Cambridge and successfully passed the required exam. In addition, she wanted to go to King`s College, Cambridge, but abandoned the plan when it turned out that the college did not provide scholarships for women. In her freshman year, Byrd felt that men were dismissive of the academic potential of women, and this only strengthened her determination to succeed. She also became a supporter of feminist views, which played an important role in her later life. Finally, Byrd received her master`s degree at Newnham and remained at Cambridge for her PhD. From 1979 to 1983, Mary Beard taught antique art at King`s College London . She returned to Cambridge in 1984 as a Research Fellow at Newnham College and became the only female professor of Classical Studies. Rome in the Late Republic, which she co-authored with Cambridge classical scholar Michael Crawford , was published the same year. In 1985 Byrd married Robin Cormac Sinclair . In 1985 she gave birth to a daughter, and in 1987 - a son. In 1992, she became editor of the Antiquity section of The Times Literary Supplement. Shortly after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in the United States, she was among the authors invited to write several articles by the publishers of the London Review of Books. Mary expressed thoughts that have become very popular under the generic title "On the Justice of Roosting Chickens", based on the book Ward Churchill "On the Justice of Roosting Chickens: Reflections on the Consequences of US Imperial Arrogance and Criminality ". In November 2007, Mary Beard admitted that hostility to these comments has not yet subsided, although she believes she has presented a standard view: terrorism was linked to American foreign policy. Since 2004 Professor of Classical Studies at Cambridge. In 2008/2009 she was a visiting professor named after Seider at the University of California at Berkeley, where she gave a series of lectures "Roman Laughter".

Classics: A Very Short Introduction PDF

Mary Beard / Winifred Mary Beard - British writer, antiquarian, Cambridge professor (since 2004). He is also the editor of the Antiquities section of The Times Literary Supplement (literary supplement of The Times), the author of the blog A Don`s Life, which is published as a regular column in The Times. Her frequent appearances to the media, and sometimes controversial public statements, earned her fame and the title of "England`s most famous antiquarian." Born January 1, 1955 in Mach Wenlock, Shropshire. Mary Beard studied at Direct grant grammar school . In the summer she took part in archaeological excavations - at first to earn money for recreation, but later unexpectedly began to take an interest in the study of antiquity. At the age of 18, Mary Beard was interviewed at Newnham College, Cambridge and successfully passed the required exam. In addition, she wanted to go to King`s College, Cambridge, but abandoned the plan when it turned out that the college did not provide scholarships for women. In her freshman year, Byrd felt that men were dismissive of the academic potential of women, and this only strengthened her determination to succeed. She also became a supporter of feminist views, which played an important role in her later life. Finally, Byrd received her master`s degree at Newnham and remained at Cambridge for her PhD. From 1979 to 1983, Mary Beard taught antique art at King`s College London . She returned to Cambridge in 1984 as a Research Fellow at Newnham College and became the only female professor of Classical Studies. Rome in the Late Republic, which she co-authored with Cambridge classical scholar Michael Crawford , was published the same year. In 1985 Byrd married Robin Cormac Sinclair . In 1985 she gave birth to a daughter, and in 1987 - a son. In 1992, she became editor of the Antiquity section of The Times Literary Supplement. Shortly after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in the United States, she was among the authors invited to write several articles by the publishers of the London Review of Books. Mary expressed thoughts that have become very popular under the generic title "On the Justice of Roosting Chickens", based on the book Ward Churchill "On the Justice of Roosting Chickens: Reflections on the Consequences of US Imperial Arrogance and Criminality ". In November 2007, Mary Beard admitted that hostility to these comments has not yet subsided, although she believes she has presented a standard view: terrorism was linked to American foreign policy. Since 2004 Professor of Classical Studies at Cambridge. In 2008/2009 she was a visiting professor named after Seider at the University of California at Berkeley, where she gave a series of lectures "Roman Laughter".