Memories: From Moscow to the Black Sea

Memories: From Moscow to the Black Sea by Nadezhda Alexandrovna Lokhvitskaya (Teffi)

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Considered Teffi’s single greatest work, Memories: From Moscow to the Black Sea is a deeply personal account of the author’s last months in Russia and Ukraine, suffused with her acute awareness of the political currents churning around her, many of which have now resurfaced.

In 1918, in the immediate aftermath of the Russian Revolution, Teffi, whose stories and journalism had made her a celebrity in Moscow, was invited to read from her work in Ukraine. She accepted the invitation eagerly, though she had every intention of returning home. As it happened, her trip ended four years later in Paris, where she would spend the rest of her life in exile. None of this was foreseeable when she arrived in German-occupied Kiev to discover a hotbed of artistic energy and experimentation. When Kiev fell several months later to Ukrainian nationalists, Teffi fled south to Odessa, then on to the port of Novorossiysk, from which she embarked at last for Constantinople. Danger and death threaten throughout Memories, even as the book displays the brilliant style, keen eye, comic gift, and deep feeling that have made Teffi one of the most beloved of twentieth-century Russian writers.

259 pages, published in
Nadezhda Alexandrovna Lokhvitskaya (Teffi)

A book by Nadezhda Alexandrovna Lokhvitskaya (Teffi)

Nadezhda Aleksandrovna Teffi (Lokhvitskaya) The younger sister of the poet Mirra Lokhvitskaya, took the pseudonym Teffi in honor of one of the heroes Rudyard Kipling. She was known for her satirical poems and feuilletons, and was a regular contributor to the Satyricon magazine. Teffi`s satire often had a very original character: for example, the 1905 poem "From Mickiewicz" is based on a parallel between the well-known ballad of Adam Mickiewicz "Voivode" and a specific, recent event of the day. Teffi`s stories were systematically published by such authoritative Parisian newspapers and magazines as "Coming Russia", "Link", "Russian Notes", "Modern Notes". Nicholas II was a fan of Teffi, and sweets were named after Teffi. At the suggestion of Lenin, stories of the 1920s, which described the negative aspects of emigrant life, were published in the USSR in the form of pirated collections until the writer made a public accusation [source not specified 131 days]. After the closure in 1918 of the newspaper "Russian Word", where Teffi worked, she went to Kiev and Odessa with literary performances. This trip brought her to Novorossiysk, from where in the summer of 1919 she went to Turkey [8]. In the fall of 1919 she was already in Paris, and in February 1920 two of her poems appeared in a Parisian literary magazine, in April she organized a literary salon [6] [9]. In 1922-1923 she lived in Germany. From the mid-1920s she lived in a de facto marriage with Pavel Andreevich Tikston (d.

1935). She died on October 6, 1952 in Paris, two days later she was buried in the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Paris and was buried in the Russian cemetery of Sainte-Genevieve-des-Bois. She was called the first Russian comedian of the beginning of the 20th century, “the queen of Russian humor”, but she was never a supporter of pure humor, she always combined it with sadness and witty observations of the surrounding life. After emigration, satire and humor gradually cease to dominate in her work, observations of life acquire a philosophical character.

Memories: From Moscow to the Black Sea PDF

Nadezhda Aleksandrovna Teffi (Lokhvitskaya) The younger sister of the poet Mirra Lokhvitskaya, took the pseudonym Teffi in honor of one of the heroes Rudyard Kipling. She was known for her satirical poems and feuilletons, and was a regular contributor to the Satyricon magazine. Teffi`s satire often had a very original character: for example, the 1905 poem "From Mickiewicz" is based on a parallel between the well-known ballad of Adam Mickiewicz "Voivode" and a specific, recent event of the day. Teffi`s stories were systematically published by such authoritative Parisian newspapers and magazines as "Coming Russia", "Link", "Russian Notes", "Modern Notes". Nicholas II was a fan of Teffi, and sweets were named after Teffi. At the suggestion of Lenin, stories of the 1920s, which described the negative aspects of emigrant life, were published in the USSR in the form of pirated collections until the writer made a public accusation [source not specified 131 days]. After the closure in 1918 of the newspaper "Russian Word", where Teffi worked, she went to Kiev and Odessa with literary performances. This trip brought her to Novorossiysk, from where in the summer of 1919 she went to Turkey [8]. In the fall of 1919 she was already in Paris, and in February 1920 two of her poems appeared in a Parisian literary magazine, in April she organized a literary salon [6] [9]. In 1922-1923 she lived in Germany. From the mid-1920s she lived in a de facto marriage with Pavel Andreevich Tikston (d. 1935). She died on October 6, 1952 in Paris, two days later she was buried in the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral in Paris and was buried in the Russian cemetery of Sainte-Genevieve-des-Bois. She was called the first Russian comedian of the beginning of the 20th century, “the queen of Russian humor”, but she was never a supporter of pure humor, she always combined it with sadness and witty observations of the surrounding life. After emigration, satire and humor gradually cease to dominate in her work, observations of life acquire a philosophical character.