A Song of Stone

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Ian Banks

A book by Ian Banks

Iain Banks ( Iain Menzies Banks ) - writer, born on February 16, 1954 in Scotland, died on June 9, 2013. He wrote both "realistic" works (under the name Iain Banks ) and science fiction (under the name Iain M.

Banks ). Banks` sci-fi creations belong to the genre of space opera. They represent a cycle that takes place in a world where artificial intelligence has long surpassed the intelligence of homo sapiens in power, and intelligent starships and CPUs operate in his books side by side with representatives of intelligent races that evolved biologically. Banks` world is almost a utopia: physical diseases are defeated there, in principle you can live indefinitely, almost anywhere in the Universe can be reached in a short time by making a hyperspace jump (the speed of light has long ceased to be a limit), for people (more precisely, it is not quite people, since they do not come from the Earth) many "dwellings" in space have been built, for every taste; almost any desire of an intelligent being can be satisfied. There are no permanent authorities - if necessary, such bodies are created "on the fly" ("adhocracy", from the Latin ad hoc) - for example, as a result of the cooperation of several superintelligences, which in reality are starship worlds or asteroid worlds. Problems in the affluent society described by Banks nevertheless arise - for example, through interaction with hostile cultures ("Remember Phleb"), or when faced with phenomena from the "outside world" ("Excession"). Ian Banks is one of the most famous Scots. After Sean Connery, of course. However, the stories about his antics are no less curious than his novels: they say that he tore his passport in protest against the war in Iraq and sent it to Tony Blair.  Ian Banks: the first interview in Russian : - Is it easy for you to write? - Of course, it is easy ...

If it was difficult for me to write, I would write books less often, but would start doing what seemed to me exciting, profitable and would bring satisfaction. - For example? Who would you be if you weren`t a writer? - I would probably write music. And if it did not work out with creativity, I would become a geologist or astronomer. Both of these areas are very interesting to me (or maybe the whole point is that both are dealing with large numbers?). - What books do you read yourself? - Similar to what I write myself. For the most part, this is mainstream - prose and science fiction. I guess I read less non-fiction than I would like, but I love just reading good novels too much! I also read what my acquaintances advise me, and finally try to deal with those classics that I did not finish reading at the university. - How did it happen that you became interested in science fiction, and who influenced you? - I just read a lot of science fiction. I think I was influenced by all the authors I read, especially - naturally, in a positive way - I can single out Brian Oldiss, Sam Delaney, Barry Bailey, Alfred Bester, John Branner and John Sladeck. And these are just a few of the names. And in a negative, reactionary sense, many right-wing American writers influenced me, and in particular my understanding of Culture. ----------------------------- Iain (Menzies) Banks was born in Fife in 1954, and was educated at Stirling University, where he studied English Literature, Philosophy and Psychology. Banks came to widespread and controversial public notice with the publication of his first novel, The Wasp Factory, in 1984.

His first science fiction novel, Consider Phlebas, was published in 1987.

He has continued to write both mainstream fiction (as Iain Banks) and science fiction (as Iain M.

Banks). He is now acclaimed as one of the most powerful, innovative and exciting writers of his generation: The Guardian has called him "the standard by which the rest of SF is judged". William Gibson, the New York Times-bestselling author of Spook Country describes Banks as a "phenomenon". Banks & # 039; mainstream fiction includes The Wasp Factory (1984), Walking on Glass (1985), The Bridge (1986), Espedair Street (1987), Canal Dreams (1989), The Crow Road (1992), Complicity (1993), Whit (1995 ), A Song of Stone (1997), The Business (1999), Dead Air (2002) and The Steep Approach to Garbadale (2007). Banks` science fiction includes seven novels based around The Culture, a massive interstellar civilization. These novels are: Consider Phlebas (1987), The Player of Games (1988), Use of Weapons (1990), Excession (1996), Inversions (1998), Look to Windward (2000) and Matter (2008). His non-Culture science fiction novels are Against a Dark Background (1993), Feersum Endjinn (1994) and The Algebraist (2004), which was nominated for the Hugo Award. A collection of short fiction, The State of the Art (1989), contains both Culture and non-Culture work. He has also written Raw Spirit, a book about Scotland and its whiskies. Iain M.

Banks lives in Fife, Scotland.  Official site

A Song of Stone PDF

Iain Banks ( Iain Menzies Banks ) - writer, born on February 16, 1954 in Scotland, died on June 9, 2013. He wrote both "realistic" works (under the name Iain Banks ) and science fiction (under the name Iain M. Banks ). Banks` sci-fi creations belong to the genre of space opera. They represent a cycle that takes place in a world where artificial intelligence has long surpassed the intelligence of homo sapiens in power, and intelligent starships and CPUs operate in his books side by side with representatives of intelligent races that evolved biologically. Banks` world is almost a utopia: physical diseases are defeated there, in principle you can live indefinitely, almost anywhere in the Universe can be reached in a short time by making a hyperspace jump (the speed of light has long ceased to be a limit), for people (more precisely, it is not quite people, since they do not come from the Earth) many "dwellings" in space have been built, for every taste; almost any desire of an intelligent being can be satisfied. There are no permanent authorities - if necessary, such bodies are created "on the fly" ("adhocracy", from the Latin ad hoc) - for example, as a result of the cooperation of several superintelligences, which in reality are starship worlds or asteroid worlds. Problems in the affluent society described by Banks nevertheless arise - for example, through interaction with hostile cultures ("Remember Phleb"), or when faced with phenomena from the "outside world" ("Excession"). Ian Banks is one of the most famous Scots. After Sean Connery, of course. However, the stories about his antics are no less curious than his novels: they say that he tore his passport in protest against the war in Iraq and sent it to Tony Blair.  Ian Banks: the first interview in Russian : - Is it easy for you to write? - Of course, it is easy ... If it was difficult for me to write, I would write books less often, but would start doing what seemed to me exciting, profitable and would bring satisfaction. - For example? Who would you be if you weren`t a writer? - I would probably write music. And if it did not work out with creativity, I would become a geologist or astronomer. Both of these areas are very interesting to me (or maybe the whole point is that both are dealing with large numbers?). - What books do you read yourself? - Similar to what I write myself. For the most part, this is mainstream - prose and science fiction. I guess I read less non-fiction than I would like, but I love just reading good novels too much! I also read what my acquaintances advise me, and finally try to deal with those classics that I did not finish reading at the university. - How did it happen that you became interested in science fiction, and who influenced you? - I just read a lot of science fiction. I think I was influenced by all the authors I read, especially - naturally, in a positive way - I can single out Brian Oldiss, Sam Delaney, Barry Bailey, Alfred Bester, John Branner and John Sladeck. And these are just a few of the names. And in a negative, reactionary sense, many right-wing American writers influenced me, and in particular my understanding of Culture. ----------------------------- Iain (Menzies) Banks was born in Fife in 1954, and was educated at Stirling University, where he studied English Literature, Philosophy and Psychology. Banks came to widespread and controversial public notice with the publication of his first novel, The Wasp Factory, in 1984. His first science fiction novel, Consider Phlebas, was published in 1987. He has continued to write both mainstream fiction (as Iain Banks) and science fiction (as Iain M. Banks). He is now acclaimed as one of the most powerful, innovative and exciting writers of his generation: The Guardian has called him "the standard by which the rest of SF is judged". William Gibson, the New York Times-bestselling author of Spook Country describes Banks as a "phenomenon". Banks & # 039; mainstream fiction includes The Wasp Factory (1984), Walking on Glass (1985), The Bridge (1986), Espedair Street (1987), Canal Dreams (1989), The Crow Road (1992), Complicity (1993), Whit (1995 ), A Song of Stone (1997), The Business (1999), Dead Air (2002) and The Steep Approach to Garbadale (2007). Banks` science fiction includes seven novels based around The Culture, a massive interstellar civilization. These novels are: Consider Phlebas (1987), The Player of Games (1988), Use of Weapons (1990), Excession (1996), Inversions (1998), Look to Windward (2000) and Matter (2008). His non-Culture science fiction novels are Against a Dark Background (1993), Feersum Endjinn (1994) and The Algebraist (2004), which was nominated for the Hugo Award. A collection of short fiction, The State of the Art (1989), contains both Culture and non-Culture work. He has also written Raw Spirit, a book about Scotland and its whiskies. Iain M. Banks lives in Fife, Scotland.  Official site