Holy Orders

Holy Orders by John Banville

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She looked at him and smiled sadly. ‘You’ve lived too long among the dead, Quirke,’ she said. He nodded. ‘Yes, I suppose I have.’ She was not the first one to have told him that, and she would not be the last. 1950s Dublin. When a body is found in the canal, pathologist Quirke and his detective friend Inspector Hackett must find the truth behind this brutal murder. But in a world where the police are not trusted and secrets often remain buried there is perhaps little hope of bringing the perpetrator to justice. As spring storms descend on Dublin, Quirke and Hackett’s investigation will lead them into the dark heart of the organisation that really runs this troubled city: the church. Meanwhile Quirke’s daughter Phoebe realises she is being followed; and when Quirke’s terrible childhood in a priest-run orphanage returns to haunt him, he will face his greatest trial yet.

233 pages, published in
John Banville

A book by John Banville

John Banville ( John Banville ) Irish writer. Uses a pseudonym for detectives - Benjamin Black . His works are distinguished by historical accuracy, metaphor, and a wealth of literary allusions. "His voice," the critic notes, "is as resounding as the voices of other Irishmen, and among them are Joyce and Beckett." Born December 8, 1945 in Wexford (Ireland). Studied at the local college of St. Peter. Since 1988 editor of the literary department of the Irish Times. His first book was the collection "Long Lankin" (Long Lankin, 1970), which includes nine stories and a story. Their themes - human losses, the death of love, freedom that cannot be given without pain - will develop in his other works as well. Reviewers noted the emotional tension that permeates all the stories in the collection. In Nightspawn (1971), using a deliberately complicated narrative form, Banville tries to reveal the limitations of the traditional novel. There was no consensus among critics about this novel; it was defined as a thriller, "black" comedy, a study of decadence. The third book of the writer, "Birchwood" (Birchwood, 1973), is a dark-toned novel with elements of Gothic. This is the story of the protagonist, Gabriel Godkin, who grows and matures in his crumbling family estate; the action takes place in the 19th century. Gradually, Gabriel learns about incest in the family, hidden hereditary vices, doubles, illegitimate children, but he manages to defend his inner independence in this closed chaos. According to the critics, who highly appreciated the novel, it skillfully combines the Victorian liveliness of sensations with the gloomy poetry coming from the author. The book won the 1973 Irish Academy of Literature Prize. Banville`s next two works, Doctor Copernicus (1976) and Kepler (1980), are romanized biographies of the 15th century Polish astronomer. Nicolaus Copernicus and the German astronomer who was influenced by his ideas. The second novel, which is similar in theme to Doctor Copernicus, is centered on the hard work of a scientist waging a struggle against a society that considers astronomy to be largely magic. In 1980, the novel won the Guardian. After two less significant novels "Newton Letter" (The Newton Letter, 1982) and "Mefisto" (Mefisto, 1986), Banville publishes The Book of Evidence (1989), which became his great artistic success. The novel evoking associations with "Crime and Punishment" by F.M. Dostoevsky, presents a chilling confession of a hero, a cynical and insensitive man, telling about the barbaric crime he committed. This was followed by the novels "Ghosts" (Ghostes, 1993) and "Athena" (Athena, 1994), but the second really significant work of Banville is still the novel "The Untouchable" (1997). It is based on the real facts of the activities of the notorious "Cambridge agents" - Philby, Burgess, McLean and, above all, Anthony Blunt, who, being agents of British intelligence, passed secret information to the Russians. Victor Maskell, Banville`s "untouchable" antihero, is, like Blunt, a patron of the arts, homosexual and double agent. It is noteworthy that the repulsive character in the novel, the Catholic Quenell, is copied from G.

Green. Critics welcomed the book, placing the author on a par with J.

Conrad and D.

Le Carré. In 2001, Banville released his twelfth novel, Eclipse. Taken from the site http://www.krugosvet.ru Wikipedia (en.)

Holy Orders PDF

John Banville ( John Banville ) Irish writer. Uses a pseudonym for detectives - Benjamin Black . His works are distinguished by historical accuracy, metaphor, and a wealth of literary allusions. "His voice," the critic notes, "is as resounding as the voices of other Irishmen, and among them are Joyce and Beckett." Born December 8, 1945 in Wexford (Ireland). Studied at the local college of St. Peter. Since 1988 editor of the literary department of the Irish Times. His first book was the collection "Long Lankin" (Long Lankin, 1970), which includes nine stories and a story. Their themes - human losses, the death of love, freedom that cannot be given without pain - will develop in his other works as well. Reviewers noted the emotional tension that permeates all the stories in the collection. In Nightspawn (1971), using a deliberately complicated narrative form, Banville tries to reveal the limitations of the traditional novel. There was no consensus among critics about this novel; it was defined as a thriller, "black" comedy, a study of decadence. The third book of the writer, "Birchwood" (Birchwood, 1973), is a dark-toned novel with elements of Gothic. This is the story of the protagonist, Gabriel Godkin, who grows and matures in his crumbling family estate; the action takes place in the 19th century. Gradually, Gabriel learns about incest in the family, hidden hereditary vices, doubles, illegitimate children, but he manages to defend his inner independence in this closed chaos. According to the critics, who highly appreciated the novel, it skillfully combines the Victorian liveliness of sensations with the gloomy poetry coming from the author. The book won the 1973 Irish Academy of Literature Prize. Banville`s next two works, Doctor Copernicus (1976) and Kepler (1980), are romanized biographies of the 15th century Polish astronomer. Nicolaus Copernicus and the German astronomer who was influenced by his ideas. The second novel, which is similar in theme to Doctor Copernicus, is centered on the hard work of a scientist waging a struggle against a society that considers astronomy to be largely magic. In 1980, the novel won the Guardian. After two less significant novels "Newton Letter" (The Newton Letter, 1982) and "Mefisto" (Mefisto, 1986), Banville publishes The Book of Evidence (1989), which became his great artistic success. The novel evoking associations with "Crime and Punishment" by F.M. Dostoevsky, presents a chilling confession of a hero, a cynical and insensitive man, telling about the barbaric crime he committed. This was followed by the novels "Ghosts" (Ghostes, 1993) and "Athena" (Athena, 1994), but the second really significant work of Banville is still the novel "The Untouchable" (1997). It is based on the real facts of the activities of the notorious "Cambridge agents" - Philby, Burgess, McLean and, above all, Anthony Blunt, who, being agents of British intelligence, passed secret information to the Russians. Victor Maskell, Banville`s "untouchable" antihero, is, like Blunt, a patron of the arts, homosexual and double agent. It is noteworthy that the repulsive character in the novel, the Catholic Quenell, is copied from G. Green. Critics welcomed the book, placing the author on a par with J. Conrad and D. Le Carré. In 2001, Banville released his twelfth novel, Eclipse. Taken from the site http://www.krugosvet.ru Wikipedia (en.)