Nickel Mountain

Nickel Mountain by John Champlin Gardner

Purchased 30 times

See more Contemporary Prose



DOWNLOAD E-BOOK

John Gardner`s most poignant novel of improbable love.

At the heart of John Gardner`s Nickel Mountain is an uncommon love story: when at 42, the obese, anxious and gentle Henry Soames marries seventeen-year-old Callie Wells — who is pregnant with the child of a local boy — it is much more than years which define the gulf between them. But the beauty of this novel is the gradual revelation of the bond that develops as this unlikely couple experiences courtship and marriage, the birth of a son, isolation, forgiveness, work, and death in a small Catskill community in the 1950s. The plot turns on tragic events — they might be accidents or they might be acts of will — involving a cast of rural eccentrics that includes a lonely amputee veteran, a religious hysteric (thought by some to be the devil himself) and an itinerant "Goat Lady." Questions of guilt, innocence, and even murder are eclipsed by deeds of compassion, humility, and redemption, and ultimately by Henry Soames` quiet discovery of grace.

Novelist William H. Gass, a friend and colleague of the author, has written an introduction that shines new light on the work and career of the much praised but often misunderstood John Gardner.

244 pages, published in
John Champlin Gardner

A book by John Champlin Gardner

American writer. Best known for his novel Grendel, a retelling of the Beowulf myth. John Gardner was born on July 21, 1933 in the family of a preacher and an English teacher. From childhood he showed interest in literature and music. In 1951, Gardner entered the private university Depo, whose program focused on art and music. Having started his studies as a student of chemistry, he soon switched to the study of literature. In 1953, having married, he transferred from Depo University to Washington University in St.

Louis, graduating two years later. In 1956, he received a Master of Arts degree and in 1958 a third degree from the University of Iowa. Thereafter, he taught Medieval Literature and Foundations of Creative Writing at a number of colleges. In 1961 he co-authored the textbook Forms of Fiction. In the 60s, he also published a number of literary articles. In the future, Gardner continued to publish literary monographs. In 1974 he published his work on the Wakefield My...

Nickel Mountain PDF

American writer. Best known for his novel Grendel, a retelling of the Beowulf myth. John Gardner was born on July 21, 1933 in the family of a preacher and an English teacher. From childhood he showed interest in literature and music. In 1951, Gardner entered the private university Depo, whose program focused on art and music. Having started his studies as a student of chemistry, he soon switched to the study of literature. In 1953, having married, he transferred from Depo University to Washington University in St. Louis, graduating two years later. In 1956, he received a Master of Arts degree and in 1958 a third degree from the University of Iowa. Thereafter, he taught Medieval Literature and Foundations of Creative Writing at a number of colleges. In 1961 he co-authored the textbook Forms of Fiction. In the 60s, he also published a number of literary articles. In the future, Gardner continued to publish literary monographs. In 1974 he published his work on the Wakefield Mystery Cycle, and in 1977 - on the poetry of Chaucer. Of particular interest to Gardner was the epic Beowulf, on which he held a series of seminars at various universities. In the mid-1970s, Gardner was diagnosed with rectal cancer. By the early 1980s, he could hardly continue to work. Despite this, in 1980 he remarried, to a colleague from the State University of New York Liz Rosenberg. The couple moved to Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, where they continued to work at a branch of the university. In 1982, they parted ways due to an affair between John and the writer Susan Shreve. However, two weeks before the scheduled wedding with Shreve Gardner died in a car accident. After Gardner`s death, two manuals he wrote for aspiring writers were published: The Art of Literature and How to Become a Novelist. In 1965, Gardner`s translation into modern English published The Complete Works of the Gawain-Poet. In 1971, a collection of translations of medieval English poems made by Gardner, including The Death of Arthur, was published. Since 1974, Gardner has been studying the epic of Gilgamesh, and in 1976 he began a verse translation of this epic, adapted for the general public. This work was completed by him in 1982, shortly before his death. A collection of classics adapted for children, Dragon, Dragon and Other Tales, was voted 1975 by the New York Times as "The Most Outstanding Book of the Year." Gardner`s first two novels, Resurrection and The Death of Agathon, received critical rather than positive reviews. Time magazine called the second novel, set in ancient Sparta, hysterical rather than historical. The turning point comes with the writing of Grendel, retelling the plot of Beowulf from the point of view of a monster, whose image was given more human features. The novel "Grendel" in 1971 was recognized as one of the best literary works of the year by the magazines "Time" and "Newsweek". Thanks to Grendel`s success, Gardner managed to publish an earlier novel, Dialogues with the Sun, which received high praise and stayed on the New York Times bestseller list for 16 weeks. The novel "October Light" (1976) was awarded the prize of the National Society of Literary Critics. In 1978, Gardner`s controversial essay "On Moral Literature" was published, in which he opposed the subjectivist philosophical and aesthetic concepts in modern literature. According to Gardner, real art is moral and strives to make life better, it resists entropy and chaos, affirming the concepts of goodness, truth and beauty - "relative absolute values." Literature should deal, Gardner argues, not with abstract constructions, but with the relationship of living people, and contemporary writers have pushed the human character and moral positions of characters into the background, joining together on the technique of word play. At the same time, Gardner`s own novels are distinguished by a postmodern, experimental style, which he opposed in a programmatic essay. Gardner`s works have been translated into Bulgarian, Hungarian, Mongolian, German, Polish, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, French, Croatian, Czech, Japanese. John Gardner`s scientific and literary activities have brought him a number of awards and prizes: 1972 - National Education Prize 1973 - Denforth Foundation Scholarship 1974 - Guggenheim Scholarship 1976 - National Society of Literary Critics Prize for the novel "October Light"