The Tale of Tsar Saltan, of His Son, the Glorious and Mighty Knight Prince Guidon Saltonovich, and of the Fair Swan-Princess

The Tale of Tsar Saltan, of His Son, the Glorious and Mighty Knight Prince Guidon Saltonovich, and of the Fair Swan-Princess by Alexander Sergeevich Pushkin

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The story is about three sisters. The youngest is chosen by Tsar Saltan (Saltán) to be his wife. He orders the other two sisters to be his royal cook and weaver. They become jealous of their younger sister. When the tsar goes off to war, the tsaritsa gives birth to a son, Prince Gvidon (Gvidón.) The older sisters arrange to have the tsaritsa and the child sealed in a barrel and thrown into the sea. The sea takes pity on them and casts them on the shore of a remote island, Buyan. The son, having quickly grown while in the barrel, goes hunting. He ends up saving an enchanted swan from a kite bird. The swan creates a city for Prince Gvidon to rule, but he is homesick, so the swan turns him into a mosquito to help him. In this guise, he visits Tsar Saltan`s court, where he stings his aunt in the eye and escapes. Back in his realm, the swan gives Gvidon a magical squirrel. But he continues to pine for home, so the swan transforms him again, this time into a fly. In this guise Prince Gvidon visits Saltan`s court again and he stings his older aunt in the eye. The third time, the Prince is transformed into a bumblebee and stings the nose of his grandmother. In the end, The Prince expresses a desire for a bride instead of his old home, at which point the swan is revealed to be a beautiful princess, whom he marries. He is visited by the Tsar, who is overjoyed to find his newly married son and daughter-in-law.

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Alexander Sergeevich Pushkin

A book by Alexander Sergeevich Pushkin

PUSHKIN Alexander Sergeevich (1799 - 1837), poet, prose writer, playwright, publicist, critic, founder of new Russian literature, creator of the Russian literary language. Born May 26 (June 6 NS) 1799 in Moscow, in the German settlement. Father, Sergei Lvovich Pushkin, belonged to an old noble family; mother, Nadezhda Osipovna Pushkina, née Hannibal, was the granddaughter of Abram Petrovich Hannibal - "the arap of Peter the Great". Brought up by French tutors, he learned from home teaching only an excellent knowledge of French and a love of reading. As a child, Pushkin got acquainted with Russian poetry from Lomonosov to Zhukovsky, with the comedies of Moliere and Beaumarchais, the works of Voltaire and other educators of the 18th century. Love for his native language was instilled in him by his grandmother, Maria Alekseevna Hannibal, who spoke and wrote excellent Russian (a rare phenomenon in noble families of that time), and his nanny Arina Rodionovna. The early development o...

The Tale of Tsar Saltan, of His Son, the Glorious and Mighty Knight Prince Guidon Saltonovich, and of the Fair Swan-Princess PDF

PUSHKIN Alexander Sergeevich (1799 - 1837), poet, prose writer, playwright, publicist, critic, founder of new Russian literature, creator of the Russian literary language. Born May 26 (June 6 NS) 1799 in Moscow, in the German settlement. Father, Sergei Lvovich Pushkin, belonged to an old noble family; mother, Nadezhda Osipovna Pushkina, née Hannibal, was the granddaughter of Abram Petrovich Hannibal - "the arap of Peter the Great". Brought up by French tutors, he learned from home teaching only an excellent knowledge of French and a love of reading. As a child, Pushkin got acquainted with Russian poetry from Lomonosov to Zhukovsky, with the comedies of Moliere and Beaumarchais, the works of Voltaire and other educators of the 18th century. Love for his native language was instilled in him by his grandmother, Maria Alekseevna Hannibal, who spoke and wrote excellent Russian (a rare phenomenon in noble families of that time), and his nanny Arina Rodionovna. The early development of Pushkin`s literary inclinations was facilitated by literary evenings in the Pushkin house, where prominent writers gathered. In 1811, Pushkin entered the newly opened Tsarskoye Selo Lyceum - a privileged educational institution designed to train senior government officials from the children of the nobility under a special program. Here Pushkin first felt like a Poet: his talent was recognized by his comrades in the Lyceum, among whom were Delvig, Kuchelbecker, Pushchin, the mentors of the Lyceum, as well as the leading figures of Russian literature: Derzhavin, Zhukovsky, Batyushkov, Karamzin. Pushkin and St. Petersburg The Petersburg period (summer 1817 - spring 1820) is stormy: formally listed in the Collegium of Foreign Affairs, Pushkin is not burdened with service, preferring theater, friendly feasts, high life, short "romances" and frequent duels, harsh poems, witticisms and epigrams. According to the conviction shared by both Karamzin and people of the Decembrist type, Pushkin is windy, frivolous and hardly worthy of his poetic talent. At the same time, Pushkin`s friendship with P.Ya. Chaadaev and other famous poets and writers of that time, he communicates with the staunch opponent of serfdom N.I. Turgenev (the impact of his views is tangible in the poem "Village", 1819), writes poetry in a high civic tradition ("Liberty", 1818), refuses (not without the influence of P.A.Katenin) from reckless Karamzinism and pays tribute to the quest of archaist poets ; through Delvig meets E.A. Baratynsky and P.A. Pletnev. Young people - students and free-thinkers of that time - perceive Pushkin as a recognized leader. The result of these years was the poem Ruslan and Lyudmila (published in a separate edition in early August 1820), which was the fulfillment of the poetic order of the era, over which Zhukovsky and Batyushkov fought in vain. The poem effortlessly combines historical heroism, elegiac melancholy, frivolity, national flavor, fantasy and humor. LINK The Emperor was seriously alarmed by, in his opinion, outrageous poems and stories by Pushkin. He decided to punish the poet by exiling him to Siberia or to the Solovetsky monastery. Pushkin was summoned to the military governor of Petersburg, Count M.A. Miloradovich. There he, confessing that he had destroyed seditious verses ahead of time, filled them with a whole notebook (not found). Touched by the knightly gesture, Miloradovich promised royal forgiveness; Apparently, Karamzin, who was usually not inclined to intercession, also turned to Alexander I. The punishment was mitigated, and Pushkin was seconded to the disposal of the governor of Bessarabia, Lieutenant General I. N. Inzov. Having met in Yekaterinoslav with the new chief and having made a trip to the Caucasus and the Crimea with his permission, Pushkin arrives in Chisinau (September 1820). The news about European revolutions and the Greek uprising, the Bessarabian "mixture of clothes and faces, tribes, dialects, states", contacts with members of secret societies (M.F. Orlov, V.F. Raevsky, P.I. both the growth of political radicalism (statements recorded by his contemporaries; before his expulsion, Pushkin promised Karamzin not to write "against the government" for two years and kept his word), and the creative hobby of J. Byron. Poeticization of individualism, which is complexly associated with love of freedom, powerful passion or disappointment, attention to exotic flavor (nature, manners and customs alien to civilization), increased suggestiveness are noticeable in new elegies ("The daylight is extinguished", 1820), ballads ("The Black Shawl", 1820; "The Prisoner", 1822), philosophical and political lyrics ("Napoleon", 1821) and especially in the poems oriented toward the "oriental stories" of Byron ("The Prisoner of the Caucasus", 1820). DUEL December 17, 1825 Pushkin learns about the Decembrist uprising and the arrest of many of his friends. Fearing a search, he destroyed autobiographical notes, which, in his words, "could have confused many and, perhaps, multiplied the number of victims." With deep excitement, Pushkin waited for news from the capital, in letters he asked his friends "not to answer and not to vouch" for him, leaving behind him freedom of action and belief. The days of agonizing waiting ended in September 1826, when Pushkin received an order from Nicholas I with a courier to immediately come to him in Moscow (the emperor was crowned in the Kremlin). Frightened by the general disapproval of the executions and exile of the noble officers, Emperor Nicholas I sought ways of reconciliation with society. The return of the poet from exile could have contributed to this. In addition, the emperor hoped to attract Pushkin to his side, to make him a court poet. As a great favor, he announced to Pushkin that he himself would be his censor. The tsar`s censorship turned into police surveillance: "Boris Godunov" was banned for several years; the poet was forbidden not only to publish, but also to read anywhere his works, which had not been reviewed by the tsar. The poet`s heavy thoughts are reflected in the poems of this period: "Remembrance", "A vain gift, an accidental gift", "Premonition" (1828). In April 1830 Pushkin again made N. Goncharova an offer, which this time was accepted, and in the fall he went to his estate Boldino to arrange business and prepare for the wedding. The cholera epidemic forced him to stay here for several months. This period of the poet`s work is known as "Boldinskaya Autumn". Experiencing a great creative enthusiasm, Pushkin wrote to his friend and publisher P. Pletnev: “I’ll cook stuff for you, both prose and poetry,” and he kept his word: in Boldino, Pushkin wrote such works as “The Tales of the Late Ivan Petrovich Belkin”, "Little Tragedies", "House in Kolomna", "The Tale of the Priest and His Worker Balda", the poems "Elegy", "Demons", "Forgiveness" and many others, completed "Eugene Onegin". On February 18, 1831, Pushkin married N. Goncharova in Moscow. In the summer of 1831, Pushkin again entered the civil service at the Foreign Collegium with the right to access the state archive. He began to write The History of Pugachev (1833), the historical research The History of Peter I. The last years of Pushkin`s life passed in a difficult atmosphere of increasingly aggravated relations with the tsar and enmity towards the poet on the part of influential circles of the court and bureaucratic aristocracy. In order not to lose access to the archive, Pushkin was forced to come to terms with the appointment of his chamber-cadet of the court, insulting to the poet, since this court rank was usually "complained" to young people. The poet was watched, his letters were re-illustrated, the material affairs of the family deteriorated more and more (Pushkin had four children - Maria, Natalya, Alexander and Grigory), debts grew. But, although in such difficult conditions creative work could not be intense, it was in recent years that Pushkin wrote the stories "The Queen of Spades" (1833), "Egyptian Nights", "The Captain`s Daughter" (1836), the poem "The Bronze Horseman", fairy tales. At the end of 1835, Pushkin received permission to publish his journal, which he named "Sovremennik". He hoped that the magazine would contribute to the development of Russian literature, and did everything to achieve this goal - the artistic level of the magazine was unusually high: such a collection of brilliant talents was not known to Russian periodicals (Zhukovsky, Baratynsky, Vyazemsky, D. Davydov, Gogol, Tyutchev, Koltsov). In the winter of 1836, envious and enemies of Pushkin from the highest Petersburg aristocracy launched a vile slander against his wife, linking her name with the name of the tsar, and then with the name of Baron Dantes, who was favored by Nicholas I, who impudently courted Natalya Nikolaevna. To defend his honor, Pushkin challenged Dantes to a duel, which took place on January 27 (February 8 NS) 1837 on the Black River. The poet was mortally wounded and died two days later. "The sun of Russian poetry has gone down," wrote V. Odoevsky. Fearing demonstrations, the tsar ordered the secret removal of Pushkin`s body from St. Petersburg. The coffin was accompanied by a gendarme and an old friend of the poet`s family, A. Turgenev. Pushkin was buried in the cemetery of the Svyatogorsk monastery, five miles from the village of Mikhailovskoye. Source: http://www.gagarin0.narod.ru/pushkinshortnew1.html