Cages

27 pages, published in
19826

A book by 19826

Ian Watson $$ 0 $$ Ian Watson was born on April 20, 1943 in the English city of North Shields, Northumberland. The first factor that determined the life path of the future writer was one of the most prestigious colleges in Oxford, Bayall, from which Watson graduated with a diploma in linguistic philology. Travel became the second impetus to literary work. Watson was lucky: he was invited to lecture in English in the most exotic countries - from Tanzania to Japan. In Tokyo, where the young philologist spent three years, he quite naturally "fell ill" with the local language and culture, which was reflected in the novel "Under the Sky Bridge", co-written with the same "Japaneseophile" Michael Bishop. Upon returning to his homeland, Watson first got a job at the Birmingham Polytechnic Institute, and then moved to a similar London one. In both he taught the Future Studies course, which literally translates as "studying the future." At the Polytechnic University of London, Watson ta...

Cages PDF

Ian Watson $$ 0 $$ Ian Watson was born on April 20, 1943 in the English city of North Shields, Northumberland. The first factor that determined the life path of the future writer was one of the most prestigious colleges in Oxford, Bayall, from which Watson graduated with a diploma in linguistic philology. Travel became the second impetus to literary work. Watson was lucky: he was invited to lecture in English in the most exotic countries - from Tanzania to Japan. In Tokyo, where the young philologist spent three years, he quite naturally "fell ill" with the local language and culture, which was reflected in the novel "Under the Sky Bridge", co-written with the same "Japaneseophile" Michael Bishop. Upon returning to his homeland, Watson first got a job at the Birmingham Polytechnic Institute, and then moved to a similar London one. In both he taught the Future Studies course, which literally translates as "studying the future." At the Polytechnic University of London, Watson taught the first academic course in science fiction in England. He began writing science fiction in the sixties, while still in Japan. True, the first major published work was the non-fantasy novel for children "Japan at a Cat`s Eyes", published in English. Most of the writer`s stories are combined in the collections "Sunstroke" (1982), "Slow Birds" (1985), "Stalin`s Tears" (1991) and others. Among his short stories were real successes - for example, "The Very Slow Time Machine" and "Slow Birds", nominated for "Hugo" and "Nebula". However, it was not they who brought glory to the writer, but the novels. He outlined his own path in the very first novel "The Implementation", which immediately brought the author to the John Campbell Award nominee. Two years later, the French translation of the novel won the highest award in the homeland of Jules Verne - the Apollo Prize. "Implementation" is a deep, multifaceted and, moreover, well "organized" book about the language. Its power and limitations, inevitable when trying to adequately describe all the wealth of the surrounding world, about its unique mission - to serve as a bridge of communication, and about the hypothetical possibilities of language to create reality, and not just describe it. In the next novel, Set for Jonah (1975), the author is again preoccupied with the philosophical problem of communication. Only this time it is contact with whales, in whose brains samples of human thoughts are implanted. Moreover, the experimental whales get acquainted with the ideas about the universe not of an ordinary person, but of an astronomer who has just made an important discovery. Standing apart in Watson`s work is a novel co-written with his wife and first published in France in 1976. For some time, the writer could not even find a publisher for the book - everyone was frightened off by the title: "Orgasm Machine". Meanwhile, the problem, as it turned out, was only in the name (the novel was published in English in 1982 under the name "The Factory of Women"), because it is quite a moderate satire on the exploitation of women in modern society. Gradually, Watson was more and more captured by philosophical abstractions, mythological and cultural ideas and symbols - this whole cycle of "dying-birth", information-entropy, objective-subjective - and much less concerned with such elements as plot, images of heroes or social attachment. Although I have to give credit to the writer: his books are becoming less and less understandable, but reading them is still great! In the novel "Gardens of Pleasure" (1980), the author materializes the surreal fantasies of the great Bosch (they became reality on a distant planet, once inhabited by colonists from Earth). Everything is exquisite, rich, thoughtful and ... the author did not go beyond this "materialization of spirits" - either he did not know what to do with all this, or the game of constructing a new world bored the designer himself. Even more chill emanates from "The Hunter for Death" (1981) - a social utopia in which peace and harmony are achieved through the internal reconciliation of each member of society with the inevitability of death. In 1984-1985, Watson`s "Black Stream" trilogy was released, which caused perhaps the most controversy. The Watson saga begins as social science fiction. The author contrasts two societies separated by an irresistible border-River: patriarchal and feminist. However, by the second volume, the action unwinds into a truly universal conflict, the reader, along with the heroine, is plunged into a cosmic collision of some incomprehensible higher forces, calling themselves the Worm and Bogomysl. The heroine has to go through a chain of adventures, to survive the mythological "death-birth" before she realizes her place in this world and her responsibility to her fellow tribesmen. Another noteworthy work, Chekhov`s Travel, is a fantasy novel about the author of The Seagull and The Cherry Orchard. A certain Soviet film company invites the hero to make a mental journey into the past on a "psycho time machine" in order to meet the real Chekhov. However, its appearance in Russia in 1908 causes a natural cataclysm in the sky over the Siberian river Podkamennaya Tunguska. And what is interesting - the real Anton Pavlovich was so interested in the news of the explosion that he put aside the unfinished for a while and devoted himself entirely to studying the mysterious phenomenon ... Watson, who graduated from Oxford, avoided spreading cranberries and treated our historical realities with utmost correctness. And in general, for him, as always, the plot is not the main thing. The main thing is thought. And after reading the book, there will be something to reflect on: here is the philosophy of history, and the problem of "historical objectivity", and the problem of interference in the course of history ... Watson`s novels of the 1990s and the last works of the writer did not arouse such interest as his early works. But I want to believe that fans of his work will wait for the return of the writer from the intellectual labyrinth into which he drove himself. In recent years, the writer has been actively attending various European conventions and festivals of science fiction. In 2006 he came to the Eurocon in Kiev. Lives in the countryside 60 miles north of London. © Vl. Gakov Ian Watson & # 039; s homepage , Ian Watson Seminars , IMDb . A review of the author`s work can be found here http://flibusta.net/b/156448