Life and death: unapologetic writings on the continuing war against women

Life and death: unapologetic writings on the continuing war against women by Andrea Dvorkin

Purchased 13 times

See more Andrea Dvorkin



DOWNLOAD E-BOOK

0 pages, published in
Andrea Dvorkin

A book by Andrea Dvorkin

Andrea Rita Dworkin is an American radical feminist and writer who is widely known for her attitude towards pornography, which, according to her, is closely associated with rape and other forms of violence against women. Andrea Dworkin was born on September 26, 1946 in Camden, New Jersey, to a Jewish family. Parents: Sylvia Spiegel and Harry Dworkin. She had a younger brother, Mark. Dvorkin`s father was a schoolteacher and a staunch socialist, from whom, in her opinion, she took on her ardent desire for social justice. Her relationship with her mother was strained, but, as Dworkin later wrote, the fact that her mother was a supporter of the legalization of birth control and abortion "long before this idea became popular in society" influenced her future activities. According to Dvorkin`s recollections, her childhood up to nine years, that is, until the moment when she became the victim of an attempted rape by a stranger in a movie theater, was completely cloudless. When Dworki...

Life and death: unapologetic writings on the continuing war against women PDF

Andrea Rita Dworkin is an American radical feminist and writer who is widely known for her attitude towards pornography, which, according to her, is closely associated with rape and other forms of violence against women. Andrea Dworkin was born on September 26, 1946 in Camden, New Jersey, to a Jewish family. Parents: Sylvia Spiegel and Harry Dworkin. She had a younger brother, Mark. Dvorkin`s father was a schoolteacher and a staunch socialist, from whom, in her opinion, she took on her ardent desire for social justice. Her relationship with her mother was strained, but, as Dworkin later wrote, the fact that her mother was a supporter of the legalization of birth control and abortion "long before this idea became popular in society" influenced her future activities. According to Dvorkin`s recollections, her childhood up to nine years, that is, until the moment when she became the victim of an attempted rape by a stranger in a movie theater, was completely cloudless. When Dworkin was ten, her family moved from the city to a suburb of Cherry Hill, New Jersey. In the sixth grade, the school administration punished her for refusing to sing "Silent Night" (as a Jew, she objected to being forced to sing Christian religious songs at school). Dvorkin began writing poetry and prose in the sixth grade. In high school, she avidly read books, which her parents encouraged. She was especially influenced by Arthur Rimbaud, Charles Baudelaire, Henry Miller, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Che Guevara and the beatniks, especially Allen Ginsberg. In 1965, while attending Bennington College, Dworkin was arrested at a demonstration against the Vietnam War and placed in New York`s Women`s Pretrial Detention Cell. The prison doctors performed a gyno exam on her so rudely that she continued to bleed for several days. Dvorkin spoke publicly about the incident and testified before a grand jury, which refused to open a criminal case, but the case received national and international media coverage. Dworkin`s testimony played a role in a public campaign against prisoner abuse. Seven years later, under public pressure, the prison was closed. Soon after the grand jury hearing, Dworkin left her studies at Bennington and went to Greece. For some time she lived in Crete, where she wrote a series of poems "Variations on the Vietnam War", a collection of poems and prose poems published in Crete under the general title "Child", and the novel "Notes of a Burning Friend" in a style reminiscent of magical realism , which dealt with the pacifist Norman Morrison, who committed self-immolation in protest against the Vietnam War. Several of the poems and dialogues printed there, Dworkin manually printed upon her return to her homeland under the title "Morning Hair". Returning from Crete, Dworkin continued to study literature at Bennington. She has campaigned against the college code of conduct, for the availability of contraception on campus, for the legalization of abortion, and against the Vietnam War. She graduated from college with a degree in literature in 1968. After graduating from college, Dworkin traveled to Amsterdam to interview Dutch anarchists from the Provo countercultural movement. There she met one of the anarchists and married him. Soon after the wedding, he began to abuse her: punching and kicking her, extinguishing cigarettes on her, hitting her knees with a wooden block and hitting her head on the table until she passed out. Having started her social activities in the 1960s as an anti-war member and anarchist, Dvorkin later became a radical feminist and published 10 books on the theory and practice of radical feminism. In the late 1970s and 1980s, she was the spokesman for the feminist movement against pornography, and her treatises on pornography and sexuality, especially Pornography: Men Possessing Women and Intercourse. attracted the attention of the American public. Dvorkin has authored ten books on radical feminist theory and numerous articles and speeches, each designed to show and expose the evils that have become institutions and norms against women. In the late 1970s and 1980s, Dworkin was one of the most influential representatives of American radical feminism. In the last years of her life, A. Dvorkin suffered greatly from osteoarthritis of the knees. Shortly after returning from Paris in 1999, she was hospitalized with a high fever and blood clots in her legs. A few months after she was discharged, she lost the ability to bend her knees and underwent surgery, which resulted in the replacement of titanium and plastic prostheses. She died in her sleep on the morning of April 9, 2005 at her home in Washington.