Neveryóna, or The Tales of Signs and Cities

Neveryóna, or The Tales of Signs and Cities by 2501

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In this novel of Neveryóna, a girl takes off on a dragon’s back for an adventure of amazement and wonder.

One of the few in Neveryóna who can read and write, pryn has saddled a wild dragon and taken off from a mountain ledge. Self-described as an adventurer, warrior, and thief, in her journey pryn will meet plotting merchants, sinister aristocrats, half-mad villagers, and a storyteller who claims to have invented writing itself. The land of Neveryóna is mired in a civil war over slavery, and pryn will also find herself — for a while — fighting alongside Gorgik the Liberator, from whom she will learn the cunning she needs as she journeys further and further south in search of a sunken city; for at history’s dawn, some dangers even dragons cannot protect you from.

The second volume in Samuel R. Delany`s

Return to Neveryóna cycle, Neveryóna is the longer of its two full-length novels. (The other is The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals.)

An intriguing meditation on the power of…

433 pages, published in
2501

A book by 2501

Samuel R.

Delany Country: USA Born: 01/04/1942 Samuel Delany was born in New York in Harlem in 1942. He studied at a prestigious school for gifted children. At the age of sixteen, he began to write novels, keeping them in the spirit of classical literature (Hemingway, Faulkner, Joyce). I sent them to publishers and even received incentive scholarships, but nothing was published. In the fall of 1961, Delaney dropped out of college and began writing his first science fiction novel, The Jewels of Aptor. The novel was published and received critical acclaim. Until the age of twenty-five, Delaney wrote nine science fiction novels, including Babel 17 (1966) and The Einshtein Intersection, which won the Nebula Prize in 1966 and 1967; the novels Prisoners of Fire (1963), The Towers of Thoron (1964), The City of a Thousand Suns (1965), later combined into a trilogy called The Fall of the Towers; The Ballad of Beta-2 (1965): the big story "The Star Pit" (1967) and the novel "Nova" (1968)...

Neveryóna, or The Tales of Signs and Cities PDF

Samuel R. Delany Country: USA Born: 01/04/1942 Samuel Delany was born in New York in Harlem in 1942. He studied at a prestigious school for gifted children. At the age of sixteen, he began to write novels, keeping them in the spirit of classical literature (Hemingway, Faulkner, Joyce). I sent them to publishers and even received incentive scholarships, but nothing was published. In the fall of 1961, Delaney dropped out of college and began writing his first science fiction novel, The Jewels of Aptor. The novel was published and received critical acclaim. Until the age of twenty-five, Delaney wrote nine science fiction novels, including Babel 17 (1966) and The Einshtein Intersection, which won the Nebula Prize in 1966 and 1967; the novels Prisoners of Fire (1963), The Towers of Thoron (1964), The City of a Thousand Suns (1965), later combined into a trilogy called The Fall of the Towers; The Ballad of Beta-2 (1965): the big story "The Star Pit" (1967) and the novel "Nova" (1968). Two of his stories, written during this period, also received awards. These are "Always and Gomorrah ..." - "Nebula 1967" and "Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-precious Stones", which won two awards at once - "Nebula 1969" and "Hugo 1970". This is where the first conditional period in the writer`s work ends. The awards are also coming to an end. Delany`s prose becomes denser, richer and more difficult to comprehend. In 1975, after five years of hard work, Dhalgren was published - the largest (about 900 pages) and to this day is considered by critics to be central to Dylany`s work. The novel did not win any awards, but the book sold 700,000 copies. Readers were not stopped by the fact that the novel is very intense, complex in form and style. A lot of controversy flared up around him: some critics even argued that Dalgren did not belong to science fiction at all, and his heroes were not interesting, and their role in society was insignificant. Delaney himself formulated the essence of the novel as follows: "The book claims that the `culture` of relationships in a gang of criminals, headed by a person who is on the verge of insanity, is no less complex than the `culture` of relationships among the middle class at a dinner party." In 1976, the novel Triton appears. As Delaney himself admitted, working on it after "Dalgren" seemed very easy. In this novel, the writer tried to give a psychological analysis of a person who does not evoke any sympathy. In addition, the novel sharply and deeply explores homosexual and heterosexual relationships. In the eighties, influenced by Joanna`s work, Russ Delaney creates a four-volume series about Neveryon: Tales of Neveryon (1979), Neveryona, or The Tales of Signs and Cities (1983 ), Flight from Neveryon (1985), and Return to Neveryon (1989). This series is written in the fantasy genre. The action takes place in the distant fairytale past. But here, too, Delany deviates from the classical laws of the genre, revises them from his original positions, rework them, and the result is completely unexpected. Delaney also tries himself in the genre of classical opera. In 1984, he wrote the novel “Stars in my pocket like grains of sand”, again touching on the life of homosexuals. And as a continuation and development of this theme - the novel "The Movement of Light in Water" (1988) - an autobiographical work based on the events of the sixties. In the same 1988, Delaney began teaching literature at the University of Masachusetts. Life in Harlem, a Negro family, a homosexual type of sexual relations - all this left an imprint on the themes and problems that S. Delaney touches upon in his works in one way or another. In almost all of his works, there are groups of people deprived and oppressed from the point of view of the generally accepted morality that reigns in society - renegades in one sense or another. In the novel "Babylon 17" these are "transport workers" - a huge stratum, no, the whole world, living according to its own unwritten laws, closed, but at the same time being an inseparable part of the whole world, one of its foundations, no less important than the world "Customs officers", aristocracy, science and art. And at the same time, this is a world despised, dirty and alien in the eyes of everyone else, deliberately repulsed by them. Ridra Wong is a poetess popular in five explored galaxies - a bridge to this world. Through her eyes, thoughts and feelings, we penetrate this amazing environment. Here we see the first attempts to show the complex “culture” of relationships that Delaney will reveal later in Dalgren. But if in "Babylon 17" he only touches on this topic, then in "Einstein`s Crossing" it appears in close-up. Different - different, different, different, different ... What a wealth of shades. “I am different,” says the hero of the novel Chudik. He and others like him feel different from others - "normal". But if in a small village this is perceived in the order of things, in the city it is quite the opposite. Huge masses of people strive for depersonalization, for uniformity, automatically submitting to the dominant morality in the city. The eccentric turns out to be alien, naive and helpless, like a fish cast ashore. Here "other" is a stigma. Delaney found a very capacious word. It contains all the pain of loneliness, alienation and misunderstanding. This is a world in which someone considers himself higher, cleaner, better than others. This is the world we live in. Delaney examines him, turns him inside out. But it does not do it explicitly. “We need artists, not propagandists,” wrote the Strugatsky brothers in The Ugly Swans. And Delaney echoes them in an interview with Professor L. McCaffrey: “You cannot openly promote your political views in works of fiction. They need to be expressed not directly, but with the help of allegory, and, moreover, a complex allegory. " His allegories and images change from novel to novel. And now Delaney`s work is put on a par with the work of such prose masters as Kurt Vonnegut, Theodore Sturgeon, Ray Bradbury, James Ballard. $$ delany4.jpg $$ Very often in his works Delany turns to poetry and music. He plays with words, sentences and enjoys it. As an artist, stroke by stroke, creates images on the canvas, so Delany works with words. Uses the pseudonym K. Leslie Steiner [K. Leslie Steiner]. © Science fiction archive © FantLab.ru Official site: www.starshards.org An article by Alexander Tishinin about the work of Samuel Delaney can be read here http://lib.rus.ec/b/140735