In the Tall Grass

In the Tall Grass by Joe Hill

Purchased 183 times

See more Horror



DOWNLOAD E-BOOK

In the Tall Grass begins with a sister and brother who pull off to the side of the road after hearing a young boy crying for help from beyond the tall grass. Within minutes they are disoriented, in deeper than seems possible, and they’ve lost one another. The boy’s cries are more and more desperate. What follows is a terrifying, entertaining, and masterfully told tale, as only Stephen and Joe can deliver.

43 pages, published in
Joe Hill

A book by Joe Hill

Joe Hill is the pseudonym of Joseph Hillstrom King, son of Stephen King and Tabitha King. Joseph was born in 1972 in Bangor, Maine. He has an older sister, Naomi, and a younger brother, Owen, who also became a writer. As a child, Joseph starred in the movie Creepshow (1982; directed by George Romero). He studied English Literature at Vassar College, and took up literature almost immediately after graduating in 1995. Joseph King chose his pseudonym when several of his first mainstream and fantasy stories were published. Wanting to achieve literary success on his own, without using his father`s name, he took the name Joe Hill. It was both an acronym for his real name and alluded to the American songwriter Joe Hill (1879-1915), a labor activist and leftist Industrial Workers of the World who was wrongly accused of murder and executed in 1915.

... After his death, Hill became the hero of a folk song. Joe Hill`s stories have appeared in many magazines, including Subterranean Maga...

In the Tall Grass PDF

Joe Hill is the pseudonym of Joseph Hillstrom King, son of Stephen King and Tabitha King. Joseph was born in 1972 in Bangor, Maine. He has an older sister, Naomi, and a younger brother, Owen, who also became a writer. As a child, Joseph starred in the movie Creepshow (1982; directed by George Romero). He studied English Literature at Vassar College, and took up literature almost immediately after graduating in 1995. Joseph King chose his pseudonym when several of his first mainstream and fantasy stories were published. Wanting to achieve literary success on his own, without using his father`s name, he took the name Joe Hill. It was both an acronym for his real name and alluded to the American songwriter Joe Hill (1879-1915), a labor activist and leftist Industrial Workers of the World who was wrongly accused of murder and executed in 1915. ... After his death, Hill became the hero of a folk song. Joe Hill`s stories have appeared in many magazines, including Subterranean Magazine, Postscripts and The High Plains Literary Review, as well as in various anthologies, including The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror by Stephen Jones. and The Year`s Best Fantasy and Horror (compiled by Ellen Datlow, Kelly Link and Gavin Grant). Hill`s fourteen stories were included in his debut collection, Ghosts of the Twentieth Century, published in limited edition by PS Publishing in 2005. The book`s foreword was written by Christopher Golden, saying that "Hill`s works are characterized by elegance and delicacy, reminding us of a bygone era, Joan Aiken and Ambrose Bierce, Charles Beaumont, Richard Matheson and Rod Serling ..." the closeness of Hill`s stories to the work of Kelly Link, noting, however, their more traditional orientation. The collection was awarded the Bram Stoker Award and the British Fantasy Award, and its author received the 2006 William L. Crawford Award for Best Debutant Fantasy Writer. The novel "Voluntary Conclusion" was awarded the "World Fantasy Award". "Better than at home" brought the author the "AECoppard Long Fiction Prize". The short stories "Black Phone" and "Hear the Locust Sing" were nominated for the "British Fantasy Award" -2005. After the release of this collection, the real name of the author was no longer a secret to anyone. Here is how Hill himself talks about becoming a writer, about trying to publish books, and about his own work in general: “Publishers have been buying my stories since I graduated from college. I also wrote 4 novels that no one bought, including one that I spent over three years working on, and a ton of stories that no one needed (some because they were the worst). I`ve written a lot of mainstream stories and have never been thrilled with them, although I think they were technically good. I sold a few of them (most were rejected), but none of them ever saw the light of day. Only one of those early stories was worth anything. It was pure fantasy called Pop Art, about the friendship between an ordinary boy and a bouncy child, and I had so much fun writing this story! .. The story "20th Century Ghost" ), which I wrote a few years later, was a turning point for me. I was very worried about this story, and I wanted to write something else like that, so within a year or so there was a whole bunch of stories for the collection. As I started experimenting more with surreal and fantasy stories, I felt more excited, involved and morally invested in them. It`s great to raise the flag of eccentricity, follow your own instincts and write what you want, not what you think readers will like ... In the end, my literary agent and I compiled a collection of "Ghosts of the Twentieth Century" and sent them to publishers ... And everywhere he was rejected. The last one to get it was Peter Krauser of PS Publishing. He read the first three stories, got very excited, said, “Let me see the rest,” and then picked up the collection. That`s why it came out in England - no American publisher liked it. A lot of my stories have been published in America in literary magazines, but in England most were originally published in genre magazines like The Third Alternative. But wherever they went, they remained the same strange fantasies ... Many people in my stories are unhappy. It`s just more interesting to write about unhappy people than happy people. I love writing about people who are somehow bad - they make bad moral decisions, mistreat their friends, and lie to themselves. If you can make the reader worry about the fate of such a character, a morally flawed person, you will get what you strive for, so you are much more involved in the process. You are investing in this person trying to pull himself out of the hole he dug for himself. Many stories are about bad people trying to fight their way back to good ... "(Taken from an interview with LOCUS magazine, June 2006) Hill`s debut novel" Heart-Shaped Box "was released in the US in February 2007 (in the UK - in March 2007). Even before the novel was released, Warner Bros. bought the rights to film it. It is known that Tom Pabst is engaged in the film adaptation of the book. In addition, the author has a number of written, but unpublished, novels that he mentioned in the quote above. Joe Hill very interestingly, and humorously, talks about these opuses in his blog: “The novel“ Midnight Eats ”written at 14 years old is, perhaps, a mixture of“ American Pie ”with the musical“ Cannibal ”and the comics“ Captain Underpants ”. Jonah Who Could, written at 18, is already Lord of the Rings mixed with KR Safon`s Shadow of the Wind and John Norman`s Slaves of Horus. A later novel, The Fear Tree, completed when I was already 26 years old, shows influences not only from Tolkien, but also from Bernard Malamud, as well as fantasy in the spirit of Stephen King`s The Eyes of the Dragon. " Joseph currently lives in New England with his wife and continues to write stories. ............ taken from fantlab.ru .........