Alias Grace

Alias Grace by 3035

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Margaret Eleanor Atwood Canadian English-speaking writer, poet, literary critic and feminist. She was awarded the Booker Prize (2000, for the novel "The Blind Killer", plus she was a finalist for the Booker Prize four more times) and the Arthur Clark Prize, is one of the most famous contemporary English-speaking writers. Born November 18, 1939 in Ottawa, the middle of three daughters of entomologist Carl Edmund Atwood and Margaret Dorothy Kiliam, a nutritionist. Margaret Atwood began her literary career at the age of 16. In 1957 she entered Victoria College of the University of Toronto, from which she graduated in 1961 with a BA in English. From interview : Margaret Atwood : I generally- that creature is from a completely different planet and I find the human race very strange and incomprehensible. This is because I grew up in the forest, surrounded by only a few people. Therefore, much of what people do in this life continues to amaze me. I suppose this is one of the reaso...

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Margaret Eleanor Atwood Canadian English-speaking writer, poet, literary critic and feminist. She was awarded the Booker Prize (2000, for the novel "The Blind Killer", plus she was a finalist for the Booker Prize four more times) and the Arthur Clark Prize, is one of the most famous contemporary English-speaking writers. Born November 18, 1939 in Ottawa, the middle of three daughters of entomologist Carl Edmund Atwood and Margaret Dorothy Kiliam, a nutritionist. Margaret Atwood began her literary career at the age of 16. In 1957 she entered Victoria College of the University of Toronto, from which she graduated in 1961 with a BA in English. From interview : Margaret Atwood : I generally- that creature is from a completely different planet and I find the human race very strange and incomprehensible. This is because I grew up in the forest, surrounded by only a few people. Therefore, much of what people do in this life continues to amaze me. I suppose this is one of the reasons why I do the writing craft at all: it is very important for me to find an answer to the question of why people do what they do. Scrambled eggs for the brain are just one possible answer.  Margaret Atwood : Are my characters unhappy or alone in a special way? It`s all about life situations. Think how many pages a reader can force himself to read if the main character initially shines with happiness and joy? The laws of the novel genre are unlikely to withstand such an outrage. Otherwise, the reader will certainly want to either slam the book or kick the hero well, so that he, in the end, falls off a cliff and breaks his neck. If there are no acute situations or problems to overcome in the work, what is the point of reading such a novel at all? Nothing happens in Paradise, everyone is equally happy there. But Paradise is not the place where we find ourselves in life.  Writer`s site , en.wikipedia .