Jump and Other Stories

Jump and Other Stories by Nadine Gordimer

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In this collection of sixteen stories, Gordimer brings unforgettable characters from every corner of society to life: a child refugee fleeing civil war in Mozambique; a black activist`s deserted wife longing for better times; a rich safari party indulging themselves while lionesses circle their lodge. Jump is a vivid, disturbing and rewarding portrait of life in South Africa under apartheid.

170 pages, published in
Nadine Gordimer

A book by Nadine Gordimer

Nadine Gordimer Writer and poet, Nobel laureate and politician. She was born on November 20, 1923 in the province of Gauteng, formerly Transvaal in a small mining village near Johannesburg in the family of a jeweler. After leaving school, she studied at the University of Johannesburg for a year. She began to write at the age of nine. When she was 16, the Johannesburg-based Forum magazine published the short story Come Again Tomorrow. In the 40s and 50s, apartheid was established in South Africa, racial discrimination grew, and marriages between people of different skin colors were prohibited. The writer herself recalled that in childhood she perceived "her own white skin" as a sign of advantage, and only later did she seem to have experienced a second birth. The situation in the country was unbearable for the creative intelligentsia: 12,000 books from Maupassant to Hemingway and Faulkner were banned and burned; most of the writers, in particular P.

Abrahams and A.

La Guma, emigrated. The first collection of stories by N.

Gordimer "Face to Face" saw the world in 1949, and in 1953 her first novel "Lying Days" was published, where the young heroine Helen undergoes the same evolution as the writer. Gordimer`s work reflected the complexity of the socio-political circumstances characteristic of southern Africa (although Gordimer always emphasized that she was not a mouthpiece for political ideas). Gordimer`s novel Land of Strangers (1958) is a multifaceted picture of Johannesburg society in the mid-1950s, seen through the eyes of a young English journalist, Toby Hodd. The novel Love by Occasion (1963) about the hero`s escape from the cruelty of the world into his personal, isolated life was banned from publication in South Africa for many years. The novel “The Lost Bourgeois World” (1966) fully reflected the growing feeling of loneliness and isolation in Gordimer. For some time, this novel was also banned in South Africa. In the novels Guest of Honor (1970, James Tate Black Memorial Prize, 1971) and The Guardian (1974, Booker Prize winner), Gordimer`s intonation is even more pessimistic, the sense of isolation is even more evident. Burger`s Daughter (1979) was also censored. The novel The People of Julai (1981) had a worldwide resonance. In the center of the legend is the family of the architect Smiles. Having fled from Johannesburg to the countryside, the family lives with their own servant. Psychologically, Gordimer shows the relationship between the villagers and the white family, analyzes the social and cultural abyss between them. Then came the novels "Nature`s Toy" (1987), "The Tale of My Son" (1990); short stories include Six Feet of Ground (1956), Friday`s Trail (1960), Not Public (1965), Livingston`s Companions (1971), Surely Monday (1976), Hugs soldier "(1980), the novel" July People "(1981), a collection of short stories" Something is out there "(1984) and two other novels -" The Fun of Nature "(1987) and" The Story of My Son "(1990) reaffirm Gordimer`s loyalty to their constant theme - the problems of life in South Africa. Once Gordimer noticed that all her works form a single book. Both the novels and dozens of her stories permeate both the theme of racism and condemnation of selfishness and disunity between people, lack of spirituality and intolerance. Gordimer has been nominated for the Nobel Prize several times. In 1991, the Nobel Prize was awarded to Nadine Gordimer "for literary creativity." The collection Leap and Other Stories (1991), published shortly after Gordimer was awarded the Nobel Prize, includes stories that interpret the writer`s favorite themes from different angles, the variety of writing style testifies to the virtuosity of her “small genre” technique. In the novel "There is no one next to me" (1994), Gordimer tells the story of Vera Stark, who devoted her life entirely to politics in the hope of understanding herself better in this way. The novel "Household Rifle" (1998) was called by some critics "a thriller from the life of the highest echelons of power." In 1999, the book "Living in Hope and in History: Notes on Our Century" was published, which included Gordimer`s articles and lectures on literature, culture, human rights and, of course, her work and life in South Africa. Novels, stories and articles by Nadine Gordimer, the owner of many honorary titles and awards, have been translated into 25 languages ​​of the world. Died on July 13, 2014 in Johannesburg.  Nadine Gordimer at NobLit.Ru

Jump and Other Stories PDF

Nadine Gordimer Writer and poet, Nobel laureate and politician. She was born on November 20, 1923 in the province of Gauteng, formerly Transvaal in a small mining village near Johannesburg in the family of a jeweler. After leaving school, she studied at the University of Johannesburg for a year. She began to write at the age of nine. When she was 16, the Johannesburg-based Forum magazine published the short story Come Again Tomorrow. In the 40s and 50s, apartheid was established in South Africa, racial discrimination grew, and marriages between people of different skin colors were prohibited. The writer herself recalled that in childhood she perceived "her own white skin" as a sign of advantage, and only later did she seem to have experienced a second birth. The situation in the country was unbearable for the creative intelligentsia: 12,000 books from Maupassant to Hemingway and Faulkner were banned and burned; most of the writers, in particular P. Abrahams and A. La Guma, emigrated. The first collection of stories by N. Gordimer "Face to Face" saw the world in 1949, and in 1953 her first novel "Lying Days" was published, where the young heroine Helen undergoes the same evolution as the writer. Gordimer`s work reflected the complexity of the socio-political circumstances characteristic of southern Africa (although Gordimer always emphasized that she was not a mouthpiece for political ideas). Gordimer`s novel Land of Strangers (1958) is a multifaceted picture of Johannesburg society in the mid-1950s, seen through the eyes of a young English journalist, Toby Hodd. The novel Love by Occasion (1963) about the hero`s escape from the cruelty of the world into his personal, isolated life was banned from publication in South Africa for many years. The novel “The Lost Bourgeois World” (1966) fully reflected the growing feeling of loneliness and isolation in Gordimer. For some time, this novel was also banned in South Africa. In the novels Guest of Honor (1970, James Tate Black Memorial Prize, 1971) and The Guardian (1974, Booker Prize winner), Gordimer`s intonation is even more pessimistic, the sense of isolation is even more evident. Burger`s Daughter (1979) was also censored. The novel The People of Julai (1981) had a worldwide resonance. In the center of the legend is the family of the architect Smiles. Having fled from Johannesburg to the countryside, the family lives with their own servant. Psychologically, Gordimer shows the relationship between the villagers and the white family, analyzes the social and cultural abyss between them. Then came the novels "Nature`s Toy" (1987), "The Tale of My Son" (1990); short stories include Six Feet of Ground (1956), Friday`s Trail (1960), Not Public (1965), Livingston`s Companions (1971), Surely Monday (1976), Hugs soldier "(1980), the novel" July People "(1981), a collection of short stories" Something is out there "(1984) and two other novels -" The Fun of Nature "(1987) and" The Story of My Son "(1990) reaffirm Gordimer`s loyalty to their constant theme - the problems of life in South Africa. Once Gordimer noticed that all her works form a single book. Both the novels and dozens of her stories permeate both the theme of racism and condemnation of selfishness and disunity between people, lack of spirituality and intolerance. Gordimer has been nominated for the Nobel Prize several times. In 1991, the Nobel Prize was awarded to Nadine Gordimer "for literary creativity." The collection Leap and Other Stories (1991), published shortly after Gordimer was awarded the Nobel Prize, includes stories that interpret the writer`s favorite themes from different angles, the variety of writing style testifies to the virtuosity of her “small genre” technique. In the novel "There is no one next to me" (1994), Gordimer tells the story of Vera Stark, who devoted her life entirely to politics in the hope of understanding herself better in this way. The novel "Household Rifle" (1998) was called by some critics "a thriller from the life of the highest echelons of power." In 1999, the book "Living in Hope and in History: Notes on Our Century" was published, which included Gordimer`s articles and lectures on literature, culture, human rights and, of course, her work and life in South Africa. Novels, stories and articles by Nadine Gordimer, the owner of many honorary titles and awards, have been translated into 25 languages ​​of the world. Died on July 13, 2014 in Johannesburg.  Nadine Gordimer at NobLit.Ru