The House of Souls

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"The House of Souls" contains four of Arthur Machen`s best short works: "A Fragment of Life," "The White People," "The Great God Pan," and "The Inmost Light." Introduction by Arthur Machen. "His powerful horror-material of the nineties and earlier nineteen-hundreds stands alone in its class, and marks a distinct epoch in the history of this literary form." -- H.P. Lovecraft

218 pages, published in
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Arthur Llewelyn Jones (May k yen, exactly so, in his original biography this is especially emphasized), b. 1863, Caerleon-on-Ask, Wales. From a young age, he lives in London, interrupting odd jobs, teaching, and later - a literary day laborer (translation of "Memoirs of Casanova"). After the death of his father, who left him some fortune, he devoted himself to literature. In 1895 he published his story "The Great God Pan" - one of his most famous works. The mystical motives of his works (including, "Small Light", "White Powder") are not recognized at home. Only in 1901, "The Great God Pan" was published in France. By that time Machen, desperate to see his works coming out in notable circulations, having lost his beloved wife, lives in obscurity and poverty. He gives up literary activity and enters the itinerant theater troupe. Then, shortly before the First World War, he begins to engage in journalism in order to make ends meet. He returned to literature to write "The Great...

The House of Souls PDF

Arthur Llewelyn Jones (May k yen, exactly so, in his original biography this is especially emphasized), b. 1863, Caerleon-on-Ask, Wales. From a young age, he lives in London, interrupting odd jobs, teaching, and later - a literary day laborer (translation of "Memoirs of Casanova"). After the death of his father, who left him some fortune, he devoted himself to literature. In 1895 he published his story "The Great God Pan" - one of his most famous works. The mystical motives of his works (including, "Small Light", "White Powder") are not recognized at home. Only in 1901, "The Great God Pan" was published in France. By that time Machen, desperate to see his works coming out in notable circulations, having lost his beloved wife, lives in obscurity and poverty. He gives up literary activity and enters the itinerant theater troupe. Then, shortly before the First World War, he begins to engage in journalism in order to make ends meet. He returned to literature to write "The Great Return" in 1915, and in 1922 - "Secret Glory", also not known. He died in 1947, leaving behind several dozen stories and short stories, the plots of many of which are heavily involved in the synthesis of mysticism, paganism and magic of the Wiccan Tradition. Further, according to L. Povelya and J. Bergier, "Morning of the Magicians": "For Machen, as follows from all his works," man was created from mystery for secrets and visions. " Reality is supernatural. The outside world is not very instructive - at least if you do not look at it as a receptacle for minds; only those books that are devoted to the search for eternal truth can be considered really useful. Critic Philip van Doren Stern says: "Machen`s fiction stories may have more profound truths than all the charts and statistics in the world." From Lovecraft: “Of the living creators of cosmic horror, ascended to the highest artistic peak, few, if any, can compete with the versatile Arthur Maken, author of several dozen short and long stories in which an element of secret horror and impending nightmare is conveyed with incomparable realistic precision and liveliness ... However, the fact remains. His powerful writings on the horrible early nineties are unique and define an entire era in the history of the genre. "