The Grand Babylon Hotel

The Grand Babylon Hotel by Arnold Bennett

Purchased 75 times

See more Classic Prose



DOWNLOAD E-BOOK

203 pages, published in
Arnold Bennett

A book by Arnold Bennett

BENNETT, ARNOLD (Bennett, Arnold) (1867-1931), English writer. Born May 27, 1867 near Hanley (Staffordshire). After graduating from Newcastle High School, he entered the University of London, intending to follow his father`s footsteps to become a lawyer, but, having quarreled with him, left his studies and got a job as an accountant in a London office. For additional earnings he began to write, in 1893 he moved to the magazine "Woman" ("Woman", "Woman") to work with a small pay. Comprehending the basics of journalism, led a "beauty column", instructed hopelessly lovers; perhaps this experience gave him the knowledge of female psychology, for which he later became famous. In 1896 he became editor of the magazine "Wooman", however, inspired by the publication of the first, largely autobiographical, novel A Man From the North (A Man From the North, 1898), donated financial wealth and became a writer. Bennett spent the next eight years in France, near Fontainebleau. He worked hard, earning a reputation as a skillful, versatile writer. Proclaimed one of the masters of new literature after the release of The Old Wifes "Tale, 1908; the traditional Russian translation of the title - The Tale of Old Women), Bennett confirmed his new status with the novels Clayhanger (1910), Hilda Lessways (Hilda Lessways, 1911), These Two (These Twain, 1916), Steps of Riceman (Riceyman Steps, 1923) and the Luxurious Palace (Imperial Palace, 1930).

In drama, the successes were more modest: Bennett`s best drama, Milestones (Milestones, 1912), was written in collaboration with E.

Noblock At the height of life and creativity Bennett died of typhoid fever in London on March 27, 1931.

Bennett is known as the chronicler of the Five Cities, the centers of the ceramic industry in his home county.

of everyday life, perhaps better than other novelists of their time Professional book reviewer who welcomed J.

Joyce, D.

H.

Lawrence, W.

Faulkner, E.

H. Emingway, Bennett admired Russian literature, knew French excellently and was a conductor of naturalism in England even more than J.

Moore. At the same time, his own works are devoid of the usual preoccupation with the problem of gender among naturalists. Bennett`s fame faded in the late 1920s; later interest in him was revived. Taken from http://www.krugosvet.ru

The Grand Babylon Hotel PDF

BENNETT, ARNOLD (Bennett, Arnold) (1867-1931), English writer. Born May 27, 1867 near Hanley (Staffordshire). After graduating from Newcastle High School, he entered the University of London, intending to follow his father`s footsteps to become a lawyer, but, having quarreled with him, left his studies and got a job as an accountant in a London office. For additional earnings he began to write, in 1893 he moved to the magazine "Woman" ("Woman", "Woman") to work with a small pay. Comprehending the basics of journalism, led a "beauty column", instructed hopelessly lovers; perhaps this experience gave him the knowledge of female psychology, for which he later became famous. In 1896 he became editor of the magazine "Wooman", however, inspired by the publication of the first, largely autobiographical, novel A Man From the North (A Man From the North, 1898), donated financial wealth and became a writer. Bennett spent the next eight years in France, near Fontainebleau. He worked hard, earning a reputation as a skillful, versatile writer. Proclaimed one of the masters of new literature after the release of The Old Wifes "Tale, 1908; the traditional Russian translation of the title - The Tale of Old Women), Bennett confirmed his new status with the novels Clayhanger (1910), Hilda Lessways (Hilda Lessways, 1911), These Two (These Twain, 1916), Steps of Riceman (Riceyman Steps, 1923) and the Luxurious Palace (Imperial Palace, 1930). In drama, the successes were more modest: Bennett`s best drama, Milestones (Milestones, 1912), was written in collaboration with E. Noblock At the height of life and creativity Bennett died of typhoid fever in London on March 27, 1931. Bennett is known as the chronicler of the Five Cities, the centers of the ceramic industry in his home county. of everyday life, perhaps better than other novelists of their time Professional book reviewer who welcomed J. Joyce, D. H. Lawrence, W. Faulkner, E. H. Emingway, Bennett admired Russian literature, knew French excellently and was a conductor of naturalism in England even more than J. Moore. At the same time, his own works are devoid of the usual preoccupation with the problem of gender among naturalists. Bennett`s fame faded in the late 1920s; later interest in him was revived. Taken from http://www.krugosvet.ru