The Stars Look Down

The Stars Look Down by Archibald Joseph Cronin

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First published in 1935, The Stars Look Down tells the story of a North Country mining community as its inhabitants make their way through the various social and political challenges of the early 20th century. Digging into workers’ rights, social change, and the relationship between labor and capitalism, the struggles of the novel’s trifecta of protagonists — politically minded miner David Fenwick, ambitious drifter Joe Gowlan, and frustrated yet meek mining-baron’s son Arthur Barras — remain compelling and relevant to readers in the 21st century.

The Stars Look Down is one of many tales of the hardships of coal-mining communities during the industrial pre-war, World War I, and interwar periods in Britain, but stands out for its unflinching prose, universal themes, and keen storytelling. The novel was adapted into a 1940 film starring Michael Redgrave as Davey Fenwick, is a New York Times Critics’ Pick, and is included in The New York Times Guide to…


666 pages, published in
Archibald Joseph Cronin

A book by Archibald Joseph Cronin

Archibald Joseph Cronin (English Archibald Joseph Cronin ; July 19, 1896 - January 6, 1981) - Scottish writer, physician. His most famous novels to the Russian reader are: Brody Castle, The Stars Look Down, The Citadel, The Young Years, Shannon`s Way, Monument to the Crusader. Archibald Joseph Cronin was born in Cardross, Strathclid, the only child of Jesse (Montgomery) and Patrick Cronin. His childhood was imprinted by the death of his father and the poverty with which his mother tried to fight alone. After two years, she returned to her parents` house, and sent her son to the Dumbarton Academy, where he studied at the expense of his uncle. In 1914 he entered the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Glasgow, graduating in 1919. During World War I, Cronin served as a doctor in the navy. After the war, he worked as a ship`s doctor on the ship, and then served in various hospitals. After marrying Agnes Mary Gibson, whom he met at the University of Glasgow, Cronin leaves Scotland and travels with his wife, who was also a doctor by profession, to Tregeny, a small mining town in South Wells, and then to Tredegar, where they spend three years, and where their first child is born. After he was appointed medical inspector of mines in 1924, he began researching the occupational diseases of miners, which he later used in such novels as The Stars Look Down (1935) and The Citadel (1937), which brought him fame in the United States.

and inspired King Vidor to create the film. For his role in the film, based on the novel by Cronin, Robert Donath was nominated for an Oscar. In 1925, Cronin received his M.D.

from the University of Glasgow and began his medical practice in Wells and London, which, however, he had to leave in 1930 when his heart began to fail. To improve his health, he traveled to the mountains in Scotland, where he began writing his first novel, Hatter`s Castle. At some point, he threw away the manuscript, it seemed to him that it was not working. But a local farmer who was digging the same moat his father started working on encouraged him, and Cronin finished his romance. The book was a resounding success in England and was filmed in 1941. After the publication, Cronin was accused of plagiarizing George Douglas`s The House with Green Shutters (1901). However, sales from the book allowed Cronin to abandon his medical studies in favor of literature. The Stars Look Down novel was socially oriented, portraying the unfair order of a North English mining town. Carol Reed`s film based on this novel, starring Michael Redgrave, was praised by Graham Greene: "Dr.

Cronin`s miners` romance was a great film - I doubt if there has ever been a better film in England," he said ... The film was recognized as the first socially significant British film. Cronin`s plots inspired directors such as Victor Saville (Young Years), Philip Lecoq (The Spanish Gardener) and Jack Cardiff. In 1939, Cronin moved to the United States with his family. There he wrote Keys to the Kingdom, a story about a Roman Catholic priest, Father Francis Chisholm, who travels to China as a preacher. There, Father Chisholm gets acquainted with the teachings of the Chinese philosopher Confucius, leads a simple life and becomes a supporter of the ecumenical movement for the unification of all Christians. However, his church leaders are skeptical about his tolerance. David O.

Selznick bought the film rights to the novel in 1941 for $ 100,000, but did not want to make a film starring Gregory Peck. However, Daryl F.

Zanuck, CEO of 20th Century-Fox, convinced him that Peck was well suited to the role of Chisholm`s father. Nunnally Johnson later wrote the screenplay and was edited by Joseph L.

Mankiewicz. The film was shot entirely at Fox Studios, with a budget of $ 3 million, making it one of the most expensive films of the year. Although English books were banned in Germany during World War II, Cronin`s works concerning miners` communities were displayed in Dresden bookstores in 1943 for propaganda purposes. After the war, Cronin traveled with his family in Europe. In his autobiographical book Adventures in Two Worlds (1952), Cronin returns to his period of work as a doctor in Scotland and South Wells, in the last chapters he talks about his religious beliefs, tells how he converted to Catholicism in the 1930s. His father was Catholic and his mother was from a Protestant family. At school, Cronin moved away from religion - he was teased because of his Catholic faith, since then he developed an aversion to fanaticism as such. Cronin`s dream was a brotherhood of men and an ecumenical understanding between different churches, not a fierce rivalry. This spirit of pacification is found in all of his books on religious matters. By 1958, sales of Cronin`s novels in the United States totaled seven million. The humanism and social realism of Cronin`s books made him popular in the Soviet Union. Based on his books, more than one film was shot and more than one television program was created. The television series Dr.

Finley`s Journal (1959-66; 1993) is based on the stories of Cronin. In the 60s, it was one of the most popular series on British television. For the last 35 years of his life, Cronin lived in Switzerland. He died on January 9, 1981 in the Swiss town of Montreux.

The Stars Look Down PDF

Archibald Joseph Cronin (English Archibald Joseph Cronin ; July 19, 1896 - January 6, 1981) - Scottish writer, physician. His most famous novels to the Russian reader are: Brody Castle, The Stars Look Down, The Citadel, The Young Years, Shannon`s Way, Monument to the Crusader. Archibald Joseph Cronin was born in Cardross, Strathclid, the only child of Jesse (Montgomery) and Patrick Cronin. His childhood was imprinted by the death of his father and the poverty with which his mother tried to fight alone. After two years, she returned to her parents` house, and sent her son to the Dumbarton Academy, where he studied at the expense of his uncle. In 1914 he entered the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Glasgow, graduating in 1919. During World War I, Cronin served as a doctor in the navy. After the war, he worked as a ship`s doctor on the ship, and then served in various hospitals. After marrying Agnes Mary Gibson, whom he met at the University of Glasgow, Cronin leaves Scotland and travels with his wife, who was also a doctor by profession, to Tregeny, a small mining town in South Wells, and then to Tredegar, where they spend three years, and where their first child is born. After he was appointed medical inspector of mines in 1924, he began researching the occupational diseases of miners, which he later used in such novels as The Stars Look Down (1935) and The Citadel (1937), which brought him fame in the United States. and inspired King Vidor to create the film. For his role in the film, based on the novel by Cronin, Robert Donath was nominated for an Oscar. In 1925, Cronin received his M.D. from the University of Glasgow and began his medical practice in Wells and London, which, however, he had to leave in 1930 when his heart began to fail. To improve his health, he traveled to the mountains in Scotland, where he began writing his first novel, Hatter`s Castle. At some point, he threw away the manuscript, it seemed to him that it was not working. But a local farmer who was digging the same moat his father started working on encouraged him, and Cronin finished his romance. The book was a resounding success in England and was filmed in 1941. After the publication, Cronin was accused of plagiarizing George Douglas`s The House with Green Shutters (1901). However, sales from the book allowed Cronin to abandon his medical studies in favor of literature. The Stars Look Down novel was socially oriented, portraying the unfair order of a North English mining town. Carol Reed`s film based on this novel, starring Michael Redgrave, was praised by Graham Greene: "Dr. Cronin`s miners` romance was a great film - I doubt if there has ever been a better film in England," he said ... The film was recognized as the first socially significant British film. Cronin`s plots inspired directors such as Victor Saville (Young Years), Philip Lecoq (The Spanish Gardener) and Jack Cardiff. In 1939, Cronin moved to the United States with his family. There he wrote Keys to the Kingdom, a story about a Roman Catholic priest, Father Francis Chisholm, who travels to China as a preacher. There, Father Chisholm gets acquainted with the teachings of the Chinese philosopher Confucius, leads a simple life and becomes a supporter of the ecumenical movement for the unification of all Christians. However, his church leaders are skeptical about his tolerance. David O. Selznick bought the film rights to the novel in 1941 for $ 100,000, but did not want to make a film starring Gregory Peck. However, Daryl F. Zanuck, CEO of 20th Century-Fox, convinced him that Peck was well suited to the role of Chisholm`s father. Nunnally Johnson later wrote the screenplay and was edited by Joseph L. Mankiewicz. The film was shot entirely at Fox Studios, with a budget of $ 3 million, making it one of the most expensive films of the year. Although English books were banned in Germany during World War II, Cronin`s works concerning miners` communities were displayed in Dresden bookstores in 1943 for propaganda purposes. After the war, Cronin traveled with his family in Europe. In his autobiographical book Adventures in Two Worlds (1952), Cronin returns to his period of work as a doctor in Scotland and South Wells, in the last chapters he talks about his religious beliefs, tells how he converted to Catholicism in the 1930s. His father was Catholic and his mother was from a Protestant family. At school, Cronin moved away from religion - he was teased because of his Catholic faith, since then he developed an aversion to fanaticism as such. Cronin`s dream was a brotherhood of men and an ecumenical understanding between different churches, not a fierce rivalry. This spirit of pacification is found in all of his books on religious matters. By 1958, sales of Cronin`s novels in the United States totaled seven million. The humanism and social realism of Cronin`s books made him popular in the Soviet Union. Based on his books, more than one film was shot and more than one television program was created. The television series Dr. Finley`s Journal (1959-66; 1993) is based on the stories of Cronin. In the 60s, it was one of the most popular series on British television. For the last 35 years of his life, Cronin lived in Switzerland. He died on January 9, 1981 in the Swiss town of Montreux.