Deerskin

361 pages, published in
33926

A book by 33926

Robin McKinley (Jennifer Carolyn, [Jennifer Carolyn] Robin McKinley ) American fantasy writer. Here`s how Robin McKinley humorously describes himself in his own blog : “I`m a writer. Mostly, I write fantasy: wizards, dragons, enchanted swords, retold fairy tales and, um, vampires. Mostly, my stories show Women Who Do Something, as opposed to women who sit around waiting for the guys to come and save them, or who are not in history at all, because the story is clearly not about sitting still.

... Most of my works are so-called high fantasy, which takes place in various tra-la-la fictional countries, although I have written several stories in which events take place in worlds somewhat similar to this one, with additional errors / peculiarities, and I love that i can say that i also write low fantasy. Moo ha ha ha ha ha. I mostly write novels. Sometimes I write short stories, but this is dangerous territory because more than half of my novels started out as short stories. I ...

Deerskin PDF

Robin McKinley (Jennifer Carolyn, [Jennifer Carolyn] Robin McKinley ) American fantasy writer. Here`s how Robin McKinley humorously describes himself in his own blog : “I`m a writer. Mostly, I write fantasy: wizards, dragons, enchanted swords, retold fairy tales and, um, vampires. Mostly, my stories show Women Who Do Something, as opposed to women who sit around waiting for the guys to come and save them, or who are not in history at all, because the story is clearly not about sitting still. ... Most of my works are so-called high fantasy, which takes place in various tra-la-la fictional countries, although I have written several stories in which events take place in worlds somewhat similar to this one, with additional errors / peculiarities, and I love that i can say that i also write low fantasy. Moo ha ha ha ha ha. I mostly write novels. Sometimes I write short stories, but this is dangerous territory because more than half of my novels started out as short stories. I also run this blog. I do not know what category it can be attributed to, but I swear by my muses and my gray hair, yes it is possible to do something. The first seven months of this blog were spent on LiveJournal. I have a website where I rave, go crazy and tell different stories. I am American, but I live in Hampshire, in the south of England ... ... because I am married to the English writer Peter Dickinson. I live here [in England] because one of us had to move and he lived most of his life in this part of Hampshire, and I am a grown up offspring of the US Navy. So I said, okay, I`ll move. I have now lived here longer than I have ever lived anywhere in America, and although I still speak as an American, just like when I stepped off the plane with my wedding ring on my finger, here I am at home. I belong to two Cerberus, Chaos and Darkness ("Darkness"). I brought them home in October 2006. They are delicious. Fortunately. And before someone else helpfully points out that I created my own monsters, calling them Chaos and Darkness, I will say that they earned those names. These are not the names they respond to, these are the names I use when I want to talk about them so that they don`t try to figure out what I need. They walk me for two hours every day, in rain, sun, hail and tornado, often at the same time. I wash my jeans and dog towels all the time. " Jennifer Carolyn Robin McKinley was born on November 16, 1952 in her mother`s homeland - in the American city of Warren, Ohio. She was the only child in the family. The father of the future writer was a naval sailor, so their family changed their place of residence every one or two years. They lived in California and Japan, upstate New York and on the Atlantic coast of the United States. The writer recalls: “I discovered very early that the world of books is much more enjoyable than the fickle so-called real world. I can`t remember the first time I read "A Little Princess" by Frances Hodgson Burnett, but I was fascinated by this unusual story about a little girl, completely alone in a strange world, telling such wonderful stories that she herself believes in them. I never managed to reach the level of Sarah Crew, but I tried very hard ”. She still remembers the places where she happened to live, from the books she read there. Thus, she first read Andrew Lang`s Blue Fairy Book in California, The Chronicles of Narnia in New York, The Lord of the Rings in Japan, and The King of the Past and Future in Maine. The writer believes that it was the frequent travel and abundant reading in childhood that gave her inspiration for writing books and stories. She also adores opera and long walks and assures that both of them accelerate the blood and knead the imagination. McKinley attended Gould Academy, a private preparatory school in Bethel, Maine, and from 1970 to 1972 at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. She graduated cum laude from private Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine in 1975. “For me, writing was the reverse side of reading; it never occurred to me not to make up stories. As soon as I grew so much that I realized that there is such a profession as writing, I realized that it was for me. I even majored in English literature in college, a good indicator of my lofty and bold contempt for trivial things like making a living; I was going to be a writer like Dickens, Hardy and George Eliot. And Kipling and Ryder Haggard and J.R.R. Tolkien. However, I was going to write breathtaking stories about the adventures of girls. I`m tired of boys getting the best roles in the best books. Fascinated by reading and writing my own stories, I spent most of my life in fantasies: perhaps the only thing that irresistibly attracted me in the real world was horses and riding. And I also liked traveling. Perhaps my childhood had an effect here - it seemed to me that staying in one place for a long time meant missing out on opportunities. " For some time after graduating from college, she lived in Brunswick, then on a horse farm in East Massachusetts, and after she married the English writer Peter Dickenson (Peter (Malcolm de Brissac) Dickenson, 1927 -), Robin moved to his homeland in the county of Hampshire, where they currently live. From an old essay by the writer: “However, life does funny things to us. I inadvertently discovered that I was settling down, looking for an excuse not to board another plane. I bought the house because I fell in love with it, and there were thousands of books I had to collect somewhere that I collected everywhere I went. Later I decided that I would like to see someone next to me who will not necessarily politely flaunt on the shelf until I take it off, and I bought a dog, a hound, which I named Rowan ("Rowan"). I began to insidiously like what tomorrow will be very similar to yesterday: walking the dog, sitting at a typewriter. I announced to myself that I had found a home in my tiny house in a small village two-thirds of the way off the coast of Maine. I also concluded, with some regret, that my personal mixture of writer`s absent-mindedness, unwavering feminism, and naturally unyielding character made marriage or any other permanent love affair impossible. In fact, I didn`t think I was losing much: I liked being alone. This no doubt explains - in one way or another - why I now live in a small village in a very large house in Hampshire, England, with my husband, the English author Peter Dickinson, three hounds and a horse, and, it seems to me, an only child and formerly a lonely adult, with about half a million Dickinson grandchildren scurrying underfoot, through the hallways and garden. When Peter and I decided to get married, it was obvious to me that it was me who would have to move: I was a little outcast from a military town, who all her life did nothing but move from place to place. So I dug up my tender new understanding of "hearth", packed it very carefully and transported it here, along with eighty cardboard boxes of books and one astonished hound. It has taken root here perfectly, but the report to the headquarters sounds extremely emotional: "Don`t try to repeat it." I won`t: I have planted over four hundred rose bushes in what was once the borders of Peter`s classic English garden - and I care for them with dedication. I can show the scars to prove it. I think I finally discovered reality. And I am amazed at how interesting it is. She gives me more and more topics to write stories about. " Before becoming a professional writer, for ten years, from 1972 to 1982, Robin McKinley changed several professions and jobs. She managed to visit an editor and transcript, a research assistant, a saleswoman in a bookstore, a teacher and social educator, an assistant editor, a stable manager (due to the fact that the horse died in her arms, the release of one of her novels was delayed by almost six weeks) and a freelance editor. McKinley`s writing career began when she was 26 and still living in Brunswick. The very first publisher to whom she sent her manuscript signed a contract with her to publish the novel. It was “Beauty: A Retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast” (1978). From the name alone, it is clear that this is a new story about Beauty and the Beast. In 1998, this novel won the "Phoenix Award" ("Honor Book"), an award given to English-language books that have not received worthy of awards in the twenty years since their release. The second book of the writer was published three years after the first - the collection "The Door in the Hedge" (1981). He was nominated for the "Mythopoeic Award" -1983 (in the "fantasy" category). Then McKinley published a fantasy dilogy “Damar” consisting of the novels “The Blue Sword” (1982; nominated for “Locus” -1983 (18th place) and “Mythopoeic Award” -1983 (in the category “fantasy”)) and “The Hero and the Crown” (1984; nominated for “Locus” -1985 (17th place) and “Mythopoeic Award” -1985 (in the “fantasy” category)). The anthology "Imaginary Lands" (1985), published a year later, edited and compiled by Robin McKinley, won the "World Fantasy Award" -1986 and was nominated for "Locus" -1986 (6th place among anthologies). Later, Robin, this time, together with her husband, will become the compiler of another anthology - "Water: Tales of Elemental Spirits" (2002; variant of the title - "Variant Title: Water: Tales of Elemental Spirits"). Three years later, the writer published The Outlaws of Sherwood (1988). Five years later, "Deerskin" appeared (1993). This novel was nominated for "Locus" -1994 (7th place) and "Mythopoeic Award" -1994 (in the category "adult fantasy"). He also entered the longlist “James Tiptree, Jr. Award ”-1994 (in the category“ gender-bending sf ”). A year after him, McKinley published a collection of short stories "A Knot in the Grain and Other Stories" (1994). He was nominated for "Locus" -1995 (14th place) and "Mythopoeic Award" -1995 (in the category "children & # 039; s fantasy"). After another three-year hiatus, McKinley publishes the novel "Rose Daughter" (1997), which was nominated for "Locus" -1998 (12th place) and "Mythopoeic Award" -1998 (in the category "children & # 039; s literature"). And again there is a break for three years, after which Robin McKinley`s novel "Spindle`s End" (2000), a new version of the story of the Sleeping Beauty, is published. The book was nominated for “Locus” -2001 (tied for 22nd place). In 2002, a joint collection of works by Robin McKinley and Peter Dickinson “Water: Tales of Elemental Spirits” (2002) was published, which was nominated for the “World Fantasy Award” -2003. A year later, McKinley publishes Sunshine (2003), which brought the writer the 2004 Mythopoeic Award (in the adult literature category) and was nominated for Locus 2004 (15th in the fantasy novel ”). Immediately after the book was published, the writer was bombarded with questions about when the sequel would be. Since then, the author has been asked this question many times, so she even had to create a special page on this topic. There you can read McKinley`s answer, which begins with a line written in capital letters: "SUNSHINE HAS NO CONTINUATION ... AND MAYBE NEVER WILL HAVE." “Because I don`t write sequels. I do not know why. But this is exactly the case. " The writer really does not compose sequels (although she did make one exception to the rule when she wrote the “Damar” dilogy). Some bibliographers single out the books Beauty: A Retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast (1978), Rose Daughter (1997) and Spindle`s End (2000) as a separate Folktales cycle. Others point out “Traditional Folk and Fairy Tales”, which, in addition to the three already listed books, also include “The Door in the Hedge” (1981), “The Outlaws of Sherwood” (1988) and “Deerskin” (1993). But these books do not share a common character or plot. Rather, they are united by a theme - a new look at famous fairy tales and legends. After "Sunshine" there was again a break of five years. And then, in two years, the writer published two more novels at once - “Dragonhaven” (2007) and “Chalice” (2008) Grunt .