Dreams Of My Russian Summers

Dreams Of My Russian Summers by Andrey Makin

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Andrey Makin

A book by Andrey Makin

[center] A mixture of French with Krasnoyarsk [/ center] Today Andrei Makin is one of the most famous writers in the West. Inexhaustible Russian literature continues to regularly and generously nourish its French sister with fresh blood. Another Russian name has become firmly established in the history of French culture. Andrey Makin was born in Krasnoyarsk in 1957. He graduated from the philological faculty of Moscow University, taught at the Pedagogical Institute in Novgorod and collaborated with the journal "Contemporary Foreign Literature". He began his writing career during perestroika, when he moved to live from the USSR to France. He is fluent in French - he was taught by his grandmother, who came to Russia before the 1917 revolution. At first, in Paris, he found himself in the position of a homeless person and even lived for some time in a crypt at the Pere Lachaise cemetery. He earned money teaching Russian and wrote novels - right in French. Much mental anguish was brought to him by publishers, who sent letters full of irony with refusals to print manuscripts, which they did not even deign to leaf through. Confident in their impeccable professional experience, they believed that it was impossible to write well in French with a Russian name. To carry them out, Andrei began to write on the title page: "Translated from Russian by Andre Lemonnier." “I did my best to be published,” Makin later recalled.

“I sent the same manuscript under different pseudonyms, changed the names of novels, rewrote the first pages ...” Finally, he managed to publish the first books - “The Daughter of a Hero of the Soviet Union” and "Time of the Amur River". In 1995, Andrei Makin received the Goncourt Prize for his book "French Testament" (an imaginary biography of a French woman who lived her entire life in Russia). For the first time in the history of French literature, this prize was awarded to a Russian writer. "I was amazed," said the then president of the Goncourt Academy, Edmond Charles-Roux.

"This is a great literature." Overnight, Andrei turned into a European celebrity. "Like all Russians," Makin said later, "I am a fatalist.

I was a fatalist before receiving the Goncourt Prize, and I am still staying.

I think I deserve it." In the same 1995, the book received another prestigious Medici Prize, and then a whole wreath of other prizes, including the Italian Prize Prize, which is awarded to the best book of those that received this year`s literary awards. Since then, The French Testament has been translated into 35 languages. And the total circulation of the book was 2.5 million copies. Immediately after the award, Makin received French citizenship: it looked like a recognition of undeniable services to French literature. Soon at the Sorbonne he defended his doctoral dissertation "The Poetics of Nostalgia in Bunin`s Prose". Not so long ago, the writer became one of three applicants for the Prince Pierre of Monaco Prize. In total, more than a dozen works came out of his pen, including: "Confessions of a Demoted Standard Bearer" (1992), "The Crime of Olga Arbelina" (about the fate of the Russian princess who lives with her son in a town that has given shelter to the Russian emigration, 1998) , "Requiem for the East" (a novel about the life of three generations of a Russian family, whose share falls the hardest trials of the past century - revolution, civil war, collectivization, the Great Patriotic War, 2000), "Earth and Heaven of Jacques Dorm.

Chronicle of Love" ( 2002). Makin is almost unknown in Russia. And in France criticism hunts for him, he is a guest of the most respected TV show "Bouillon Culture". And yet sometimes - on the part of French writers - there is a certain arrogant and unjustified condescension towards Makin: they say, look, he is almost the same as we are ...

However, according to some of Makin`s confessions one can judge that he is he himself does not believe that he is creating in the traditions of French literature; rather, he transforms it, despite the obvious "resistance of the material." Either way, Makin is surprised at the low level of French literature. "90 percent is consumer goods," he says. According to him, if a Russian writer wants to publish his novel in the West, “he needs to write a caricature - about Russian filth, drunkards, in a word, about chernukha.

And it will go.

You will harm Russia and Russian literature, but you will be successful.

but from this chernukha I catch some moments of spirit, beauty, human resistance.

" When asked how he managed not to break down in a foreign country, Makin replies: "I was saved by the fact that I got a good Soviet hardening.

It helps us a lot, and we don`t need to dump this experience.

By the way, I hate the word" scoop "and stop talking with a person who uses this bitter term, invented by slaves.

So, the Soviet experience came in handy - endurance, the ability to be content with little.

After all, behind everything is the willingness to neglect the material and strive for the spiritual.

"  Andrey Mikhailov [url = http: //russedina.ru/frontend/library/persons? id = 5826] Source [/ url] [url = http: //fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Andre% C3% AF_Makine] fr.wikipedia [/ url] *** Nikolay Bokov , 02/13/2015 Split Heroes, or what to call them now? Suddenly it turns out that Andrey Makin is also " Gabriel Osmond ". He published "about half a dozen novels," according to the site "G abriel Osmonde ", which has a photograph of a man who is publicly called "Andrei Makin." The convergence of pseudonyms happened in 2009 in the newspaper "Figaro", and the confirmation of Makin himself took place in 2011 in the same newspaper, in a note by journalist Astrid de Larmina. Osmond-Makin has written such novels as The Journey of a Woman Who Was No Longer Afraid to Grow Old (Albin Michel, 2001), 20,000 Women in a Man`s Life (Albin Michel, 2004), and others.

Dreams Of My Russian Summers PDF

[center] A mixture of French with Krasnoyarsk [/ center] Today Andrei Makin is one of the most famous writers in the West. Inexhaustible Russian literature continues to regularly and generously nourish its French sister with fresh blood. Another Russian name has become firmly established in the history of French culture. Andrey Makin was born in Krasnoyarsk in 1957. He graduated from the philological faculty of Moscow University, taught at the Pedagogical Institute in Novgorod and collaborated with the journal "Contemporary Foreign Literature". He began his writing career during perestroika, when he moved to live from the USSR to France. He is fluent in French - he was taught by his grandmother, who came to Russia before the 1917 revolution. At first, in Paris, he found himself in the position of a homeless person and even lived for some time in a crypt at the Pere Lachaise cemetery. He earned money teaching Russian and wrote novels - right in French. Much mental anguish was brought to him by publishers, who sent letters full of irony with refusals to print manuscripts, which they did not even deign to leaf through. Confident in their impeccable professional experience, they believed that it was impossible to write well in French with a Russian name. To carry them out, Andrei began to write on the title page: "Translated from Russian by Andre Lemonnier." “I did my best to be published,” Makin later recalled. “I sent the same manuscript under different pseudonyms, changed the names of novels, rewrote the first pages ...” Finally, he managed to publish the first books - “The Daughter of a Hero of the Soviet Union” and "Time of the Amur River". In 1995, Andrei Makin received the Goncourt Prize for his book "French Testament" (an imaginary biography of a French woman who lived her entire life in Russia). For the first time in the history of French literature, this prize was awarded to a Russian writer. "I was amazed," said the then president of the Goncourt Academy, Edmond Charles-Roux. "This is a great literature." Overnight, Andrei turned into a European celebrity. "Like all Russians," Makin said later, "I am a fatalist. I was a fatalist before receiving the Goncourt Prize, and I am still staying. I think I deserve it." In the same 1995, the book received another prestigious Medici Prize, and then a whole wreath of other prizes, including the Italian Prize Prize, which is awarded to the best book of those that received this year`s literary awards. Since then, The French Testament has been translated into 35 languages. And the total circulation of the book was 2.5 million copies. Immediately after the award, Makin received French citizenship: it looked like a recognition of undeniable services to French literature. Soon at the Sorbonne he defended his doctoral dissertation "The Poetics of Nostalgia in Bunin`s Prose". Not so long ago, the writer became one of three applicants for the Prince Pierre of Monaco Prize. In total, more than a dozen works came out of his pen, including: "Confessions of a Demoted Standard Bearer" (1992), "The Crime of Olga Arbelina" (about the fate of the Russian princess who lives with her son in a town that has given shelter to the Russian emigration, 1998) , "Requiem for the East" (a novel about the life of three generations of a Russian family, whose share falls the hardest trials of the past century - revolution, civil war, collectivization, the Great Patriotic War, 2000), "Earth and Heaven of Jacques Dorm. Chronicle of Love" ( 2002). Makin is almost unknown in Russia. And in France criticism hunts for him, he is a guest of the most respected TV show "Bouillon Culture". And yet sometimes - on the part of French writers - there is a certain arrogant and unjustified condescension towards Makin: they say, look, he is almost the same as we are ... However, according to some of Makin`s confessions one can judge that he is he himself does not believe that he is creating in the traditions of French literature; rather, he transforms it, despite the obvious "resistance of the material." Either way, Makin is surprised at the low level of French literature. "90 percent is consumer goods," he says. According to him, if a Russian writer wants to publish his novel in the West, “he needs to write a caricature - about Russian filth, drunkards, in a word, about chernukha. And it will go. You will harm Russia and Russian literature, but you will be successful. but from this chernukha I catch some moments of spirit, beauty, human resistance. " When asked how he managed not to break down in a foreign country, Makin replies: "I was saved by the fact that I got a good Soviet hardening. It helps us a lot, and we don`t need to dump this experience. By the way, I hate the word" scoop "and stop talking with a person who uses this bitter term, invented by slaves. So, the Soviet experience came in handy - endurance, the ability to be content with little. After all, behind everything is the willingness to neglect the material and strive for the spiritual. "  Andrey Mikhailov [url = http: //russedina.ru/frontend/library/persons? id = 5826] Source [/ url] [url = http: //fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Andre% C3% AF_Makine] fr.wikipedia [/ url] *** Nikolay Bokov , 02/13/2015 Split Heroes, or what to call them now? Suddenly it turns out that Andrey Makin is also " Gabriel Osmond ". He published "about half a dozen novels," according to the site "G abriel Osmonde ", which has a photograph of a man who is publicly called "Andrei Makin." The convergence of pseudonyms happened in 2009 in the newspaper "Figaro", and the confirmation of Makin himself took place in 2011 in the same newspaper, in a note by journalist Astrid de Larmina. Osmond-Makin has written such novels as The Journey of a Woman Who Was No Longer Afraid to Grow Old (Albin Michel, 2001), 20,000 Women in a Man`s Life (Albin Michel, 2004), and others.