A Tangled Web aka Death and Daisy Bland

A Tangled Web aka Death and Daisy Bland by Cecil Day-Lewis

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A chance meeting in a London street in the 1950s... and fate is sealed for carefree cat burglar Hugo Chesterman and Daisy Bland, the girl eager to become his mistress. When a police offer is murdered in Brighton, though, neither is prepared for the suspicion that falls upon them.

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Cecil Day-Lewis

A book by Cecil Day-Lewis

Cecil Day-Lewis (English Cecil Day-Lewis ) Literary pseudonym - Nicholas Blake ( Nicholas Blake ) 27 April 1904 - May 22, 1972 Famous Irish British poet and writer, Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE). Cecil Day-Lewis was born in Ballintubber, Ireland, to a Protestant priest. After the death of her mother, the family moved to London, where Cecil was raised mainly by her aunt. After graduating from Oxford University, from 1927 to 1935, Day-Lewis taught in a number of schools in England, constantly entering into conflicts with the administration because of his leftist views. From 1935 to 1938 was a member of the British Communist Party, from which he left after the Spanish Civil War. Passion for leftist ideas affected creativity - in his works, the writer managed to break the traditional connection of a classic detective novel with the obligatory image of high society. Lewis`s poetic debut took place back in the 1920s, poetry collections of the 1930s bring him ...

A Tangled Web aka Death and Daisy Bland PDF

Cecil Day-Lewis (English Cecil Day-Lewis ) Literary pseudonym - Nicholas Blake ( Nicholas Blake ) 27 April 1904 - May 22, 1972 Famous Irish British poet and writer, Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE). Cecil Day-Lewis was born in Ballintubber, Ireland, to a Protestant priest. After the death of her mother, the family moved to London, where Cecil was raised mainly by her aunt. After graduating from Oxford University, from 1927 to 1935, Day-Lewis taught in a number of schools in England, constantly entering into conflicts with the administration because of his leftist views. From 1935 to 1938 was a member of the British Communist Party, from which he left after the Spanish Civil War. Passion for leftist ideas affected creativity - in his works, the writer managed to break the traditional connection of a classic detective novel with the obligatory image of high society. Lewis`s poetic debut took place back in the 1920s, poetry collections of the 1930s bring him fame. In 1938 and 1954 he released two representative volumes of The Selected. From 1951 to 1956, he was professor of poetry at the University of Oxford, then director of the Chatto and Windus Publishing House. From 1962-1963, Day-Lewis was a professor at Harvard University. In 1968 he was awarded the title of poet laureate. Day-Lewis was also Chairman of the Arts Council Literature Panel, Vice President of the Royal Society of Literature, Honorary Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Fellow of the Irish Academy of Literature and Professor of Rhetoric at Gresham College, London. Along with his poetic activity, in 1935 he began to publish detective novels under the pseudonym Nicholas Blake (Nicholas Blake). Nicholas Blake`s detectives are full of literary allusions to the work of Shakespeare and other classics of British poetry; Keats, William Blake (Cecil Day-Lewis chose a promising pseudonym for a reason), Arthur Hugh Clough and Alfred Edward Houseman are especially fond of the author. Nicholas Blake`s earlier, more ponderously written books are replete with puns and lyrical digressions, often using themes from classical and Elizabethan literature. One of his first works, Thou Shell of Death (1936), which takes place on a cold Christmas in a farmhouse, even modernizes a well-known complex literary intrigue. The author offers here his own version of Cyril Tourneur`s celebrated play The Revenger`s Tragedy, written in 1607. Cecil Day-Lewis was married twice. His son, from his marriage to actress Jill Balcon, is the famous British actor Daniel Day-Lewis. ****** Nicholas Blake is the pseudonym under which the famous English poet and critic Cecil Day Lewis wrote detective novels. The reputation of Day-Lewis the poet is extremely strong, but, as experts say, in the literary-detective hierarchy, he still stands even higher than in the poetical one. Detective author Nicholas Blake was born in 1935, when Day Lewis wrote and published A Question of Proof. According to his biographer, he could not think of any other way to honestly earn the hundred pounds needed to fix the leaky roof. In the same year, his hero Nigel Strangeways was born, who faithfully served his creator for more than thirty years. Nigel Strangeways is an amateur detective. He is immersed in the composition of scholarly treatises, but a crime occurs, and he gives up his studies to try to crack a tough criminal nut. He falls in love, and then marries the famous traveler Georgia Cavendish, who dies a hero`s death in the Second World War. Then Strangeways meets the sculptor Claire Messinger, who, however, refuses to marry him. This tall, thin, blue-eyed man with a shock of blond hair loves to solve all sorts of secrets, but sometimes he has very contradictory feelings in relation to criminals - compassion and even respect are mixed with condemnation. This ambivalent attitude of the Blake detective to his charges reflected the views of his creator on bourgeois society. By the way, Blake once noticed that in the traditional detective story of the Conandoyle type (which dominated in England in the 1920s and 1940s), the problem of the criminal - society is interpreted in a rather tendentious way. The plots in which the detective acts as a reliable protector of society, in his opinion, appeal to the feelings of representatives of the upper and "upper middle" strata of society, who are very interested in maintaining the social status quo and who see their sworn enemies in those who encroach on the Law ... Those who occupy the lower rungs of the social ladder are more likely to give their sympathies, according to Blake, to "thriller", that kind of adventure novel, where the main character is in a difficult relationship with the Law, which is not at all the embodiment of justice. Blake`s detective novels have been observed to show leniency towards criminals in the sense that most of them are allowed to elude official Justice. Blake came to detective fiction in the mid-30s. The detective genre, which loudly declared itself at the turn of the century, experienced a rebirth in the period between the two world wars, which gave the genre`s historians the basis to talk about the onset of the "golden age". Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers, Anthony Berkeley shone in England, Earl Stanley Gardner, Rex Stout, Ellery Queen developed the traditions of an intellectual detective in America, and Dashill Hammett and Raymond Chandler laid the foundations of the "cool school". Blake, a detective theorist, believed that the writer has two ways here: depicting incredible characters in a completely authentic setting, and, conversely, real people in not quite real circumstances. The Blake practitioner clearly gravitated towards the second option. Respecting the main detective canons, he created curious, truly complex characters. Possessing the art of building a cunning detective intrigue, he avoided those clichés in descriptions and dialogues that the luminaries of the "golden age" sinned. According to Julian Simons, one of the leading authorities in the field of the detective genre, “Blake was able to bring the tonality of real literature into the“ golden age ”detective story. In addition, in his early works, his left-wing political views make themselves felt. For that time, both were novelties. Blake`s detective stories are replete with literary allusions that please the reader who is versed in the history of literature (sometimes, however, there were also allusions of a detective nature - one of the plots, for example, resembles Christie`s "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd", another "Strangers on a Train" by P. Highsmith) , but it`s not about the abundance of names and quotes. Respect for the canons of the detective, combined with a beautiful style and the ability to draw readers` attention to other problems, in addition to the traditional "who killed?", Allows Nicholas Blake to count with his two dozen crime novels among those who knew how to raise the "low genre" to the level of real art. ... Blake`s novel The Best Must Die (1938) entered the famous Keating`s list of the 100 best detective stories (1987) Detective. Declaration of love , en.wikipedia , kirjasto.sci.fi .  Bibliography Detective fiction Series Nigel Strangeways - [b ] Nigel Strangeways 1935 - 1. A Question of Proof - Proofs required 1936 - 2. Thou Shell of Death (aka Shell of Death) - Brenna earthly flesh; Flesh Like Grass 1937 - 3. There`s Trouble Brewing - Murder At The Brewery 1938 - 4. The Beast Must Die - The Beast Must Die 1939 - 5. The Smiler with the Knife 1940 - 6. Malice in Wonderland (aka The Summer Camp Mystery / The Malice with Murder) 1941 - 7. The Case of the Abominable Snowman (aka The Corpse in the Snowman) - The case of the vile snowman 1947 - 8. Minute for Murder - A minute to kill 1949 - 9. Head of a Traveler - The head of a traveling salesman; Traveler`s Head 1953 - 10. The Dreadful Hollow 1954 - 11. The Whisper in the Gloom (aka Catch and Kill) - Whisper in the Dark 1957 - 12. End of Chapter - End of Chapter; Decisive Clue 1959 - 13. The Widow`s Cruise - The Widow`s Cruise 1961 - 14. The Worm of Death 1964 - 15. The Sad Variety - There is no choice in Hell 1966 - 16. The Morning After Death - The Morning After Death 1944 - 0.5 Long Shot - Long Shot (story) Novels 1956 - A Tangled Web (aka Death and Daisy Bland) 1958 - A Penknife in My Heart 1963 - The Deadly Joker - Deadly Prank 1968 - The Private Wound - Personal Wound