Spies

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Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for Comic Writing Best Novel Whitbread Prize Best Novel In the quiet cul-de-sac where Keith and Stephen live there is very little evidence of the Second World War. But the two friends suspect that the inhabitants of the Close are not what they seem. As Keith authoritatively informs the trusting Stephen, the whole district is riddled with secret passages and underground laboratories. Then one day Keith announces an even more disconcerting discovery: the Germans have infiltrated his own family, and the children find themselves engulfed in mysteries far deeper and more painful than they had bargained for.

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FRAIN, MICHAEL (Frayn, Michael) (b.

1933), English playwright, novelist and translator. Born September 8, 1933 in London. In 1952-1954 he served in the army. In 1957 he graduated from the University of Cambridge, after which he worked as a reporter for the "Manchester Guardian" and "Observer", creating for himself the image of an accuser of morals. In the early 1960s, several collections were published, compiled from his newspaper publications. The collection "Speak after the Signal" (1995) largely summed up the early period of his work. Frein entered literature at first as a novelist. In his first novel, Tin Soldiers (1965), computers became the object of his satirical fervor. A year later, Frein was awarded the Somerset Maugham Prize for him. In The Russian Translator (1966), Frein switched to the topic of espionage. The result - the Hawthorden Prize 1967.

In the novel Towards Morning (1967; published in the USA under the title Against Entropy), he dealt with the journalists. The novels "A Very Private Life" (1968) and "Sweet Dreams" (1974) are written in the genre of fantasy, and each story ends with a moralizing ending, with a touch of irony. After Sweet Dreams, Frain left the novel genre for a long time and turned to drama. Of the early theatrical works, two received special praise and applause: "In alphabetical order" (1975) and "Long Years" (1976). The second play was named Best Comedy of the Year by the London West End Theater Society. Frein`s next significant theatrical work was the play "Building and Breaking" (1980). In London, the play was performed in overcrowded halls; in the United States, it was received with restraint. Genuine fame came to Frain after staging the play "Noise Behind the Scene" (London, 1982; a year later the Broadway premiere), written in the form of an outright farce. Frain`s comedy was warmly received by audiences on both sides of the Atlantic. Both on Broadway and in the West End, the play did not leave the repertoire for a long time, it won awards for the best comedy in 1982, awarded by the Evening Standard newspaper and the West End Theater Society. In New York, she was nominated for a Tony Award. To this day, Noise Behind the Scene remains Frain`s most famous play. In the play Benefactors (London, 1984; Broadway, 1985) Frain moved away from the comedy genre. The play also won awards from the Evening Standard and the West End Theater Society, this time for Best Play of the Year. She was awarded the 1984 Laurence Olivier Prize in London and the 1986 New York Critics Prize for Best Foreign Play. Frein also owns the plays Look Close (1990), Here (1993) and Now You Know Everything (1995). The play Copenhagen, released in 1998, brought him a resounding success.

The play won the Evening Standard Award, and two years later brought Frein the highest Broadway theater award, the Tony Award. Having become a successful playwright, Frein did not abandon the genre with which he began, having written several novels: "How It`s Done" (1989), "Landing in the Sun" (1991), "Now You Know Everything" (1992), "Head Forward" (1999). Taken from the site http://www.krugosvet.ru

Spies PDF

FRAIN, MICHAEL (Frayn, Michael) (b. 1933), English playwright, novelist and translator. Born September 8, 1933 in London. In 1952-1954 he served in the army. In 1957 he graduated from the University of Cambridge, after which he worked as a reporter for the "Manchester Guardian" and "Observer", creating for himself the image of an accuser of morals. In the early 1960s, several collections were published, compiled from his newspaper publications. The collection "Speak after the Signal" (1995) largely summed up the early period of his work. Frein entered literature at first as a novelist. In his first novel, Tin Soldiers (1965), computers became the object of his satirical fervor. A year later, Frein was awarded the Somerset Maugham Prize for him. In The Russian Translator (1966), Frein switched to the topic of espionage. The result - the Hawthorden Prize 1967. In the novel Towards Morning (1967; published in the USA under the title Against Entropy), he dealt with the journalists. The novels "A Very Private Life" (1968) and "Sweet Dreams" (1974) are written in the genre of fantasy, and each story ends with a moralizing ending, with a touch of irony. After Sweet Dreams, Frain left the novel genre for a long time and turned to drama. Of the early theatrical works, two received special praise and applause: "In alphabetical order" (1975) and "Long Years" (1976). The second play was named Best Comedy of the Year by the London West End Theater Society. Frein`s next significant theatrical work was the play "Building and Breaking" (1980). In London, the play was performed in overcrowded halls; in the United States, it was received with restraint. Genuine fame came to Frain after staging the play "Noise Behind the Scene" (London, 1982; a year later the Broadway premiere), written in the form of an outright farce. Frain`s comedy was warmly received by audiences on both sides of the Atlantic. Both on Broadway and in the West End, the play did not leave the repertoire for a long time, it won awards for the best comedy in 1982, awarded by the Evening Standard newspaper and the West End Theater Society. In New York, she was nominated for a Tony Award. To this day, Noise Behind the Scene remains Frain`s most famous play. In the play Benefactors (London, 1984; Broadway, 1985) Frain moved away from the comedy genre. The play also won awards from the Evening Standard and the West End Theater Society, this time for Best Play of the Year. She was awarded the 1984 Laurence Olivier Prize in London and the 1986 New York Critics Prize for Best Foreign Play. Frein also owns the plays Look Close (1990), Here (1993) and Now You Know Everything (1995). The play Copenhagen, released in 1998, brought him a resounding success. The play won the Evening Standard Award, and two years later brought Frein the highest Broadway theater award, the Tony Award. Having become a successful playwright, Frein did not abandon the genre with which he began, having written several novels: "How It`s Done" (1989), "Landing in the Sun" (1991), "Now You Know Everything" (1992), "Head Forward" (1999). Taken from the site http://www.krugosvet.ru