Guardians of the Tower

Guardians of the Tower by 3727

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Jon didn’t know why he held a sword in his hand to fend off the Wild Ones; he knew only that he was one of many who for centuries had become—

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3727

A book by 3727

Gordon Randall Philip David Garrett (Gordon Randall Phillip David Garrett ). I also used pseudonyms - Mark Phillips (Mark Phillips, with Laurence M.

Janifer), Robert Randall (Robert Randall, with Robert Silverberg ), John Gordon (David Gordon, "Honesty is the Best Politics" story [ Despoilers of the Golden Empire ]), Ivar Jorgensen, Darrell T.

Langart, Grandall Barretton, Janet Argo, Sam Argo, Johnathan Blake MacKenzie, Richard Greer, Seaton McKettrig, Alexander Blade, Clyde Mitchell, Gordon Aghill, Leonard G.

Spencer, SM Tenneshaw, Ralph Burke. American science fiction writer. He was a very extraordinary person, as evidenced by the many sharp turns in his life and literary career. Born in 1927 in Langsington, Missouri, he studied at the Kansas Technical University, fought in World War II as a corporal of the US Navy, and worked as a chemical engineer after the war. Around the same time, he showed himself as an active fan of science fiction, began to travel to SF conventions, began writing for magazines - and as a result, since 1955, he began to earn his daily bread through literary labor. Judging by the memoirs of contemporaries, he was very violent in temperament and therefore quickly earned a reputation as perhaps the biggest boozer, drunkard and womanizer in the American fandom. Real legends circulated about his adventures of that time. At the same time, however, he did not make enemies for himself, and therefore, for all his shortcomings, he was a kind and pleasant person in communication and because, working in fits and starts, he wrote a lot, was published often, and his works were marked with the stamp of true talent.

... Randal Garrett is the flesh of that generation of American science fiction writers, which is usually associated with the name of the legendary John Campbell, a writer, editor and journalist who “discovered” such outstanding masters of American SF as Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, A.E.

Van Vogt and a lot others. Garrett`s first publication took place in Campbell`s magazine "Estounding Science Fiction" in 1944, and in the future, all of his most significant works were published on the pages of this magazine. Several stages can be clearly traced in Garrett`s work. In the 50s, he was, as they say, a day laborer writer, published exclusively in magazines, and under many pseudonyms. Co-authorship with an equally young and equally prolific author, Robert Silverberg, with whom they formed a real "literary factory", sometimes issuing several texts a week, also belongs to this time. However, out of everything they wrote together, only two novels came out in book editions, while the rest of the things remained forever “buried in periodicals”. After the creative union with Silverberg broke up, Garrett wrote for some time in collaboration with Lawrence M.

Jennifer under the pseudonym Mark Phillips ; the fruit of their joint efforts was the trilogy about psi-energy and the novel "Pagan Passions". However, Randal Garrett`s talent was revealed most fully in the 60s, when he began to work solo. It was then, in 64, that the Analog magazine began publishing works from the cycle about Lord Darcy. According to most Western critics, this cycle is the best that Garrett has written in his entire life. Undoubtedly, this cycle, organically combining the features of such seemingly incompatible genres as alternative historical fiction, magic fantasy and classic detective in the manner of Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie, is now included in the “golden fund” of fantastic literature. Other works of Garrett of that time - stories, novellas, novels, also enjoyed success, but, alas, they did not acquire cult status. Garrett also gained fame in the literary world as the author of masterly written poetic and prose parodies of many popular works of science fiction. These parodies he read out loud at conventions with a large gathering of people, published in magazines, and later compiled two collections of them. At the end of the 60s, in the prime of his career, Garrett made perhaps the most unexpected turn in his life - he stopped writing, became a priest and disappeared from the sight of numerous friends and admirers for almost a decade. Nevertheless, knowing his character, many hoped that life and literature would still take their toll. And so it happened. After marrying for the third time and parting with the church, Garrett again took up the pen. However, time was lost, and, probably, something broke in his restless soul. Everything he wrote in the 80s is a voluminous, commercially robust, but at the same time a fairly standard series of "Gandalara" in the genre of "heroic fantasy". It was published under two names - Garrett and his new wife, Vicki Ann Heydron, whom he met at one of the SF conventions. Randal Garrett died on December 31, 1987, and it was not immediately known about his death in the literary world. The obituary dedicated to him appeared only in the September issue of the analog magazine for 1988 - it is symbolic that in the same issue an obituary was also printed on Robert Heinlein, who died four months after Garrett`s death. This is also symbolic because there were, perhaps, no two writers who were so opposite to each other both in their creative manner and in their way of life - however, both of them equally belonged to the `` John Campbell generation ``, a generation that, in fact, they created modern American fiction with their own hands.  Wikipedia , Bibliography .

Guardians of the Tower PDF

Gordon Randall Philip David Garrett (Gordon Randall Phillip David Garrett ). I also used pseudonyms - Mark Phillips (Mark Phillips, with Laurence M. Janifer), Robert Randall (Robert Randall, with Robert Silverberg ), John Gordon (David Gordon, "Honesty is the Best Politics" story [ Despoilers of the Golden Empire ]), Ivar Jorgensen, Darrell T. Langart, Grandall Barretton, Janet Argo, Sam Argo, Johnathan Blake MacKenzie, Richard Greer, Seaton McKettrig, Alexander Blade, Clyde Mitchell, Gordon Aghill, Leonard G. Spencer, SM Tenneshaw, Ralph Burke. American science fiction writer. He was a very extraordinary person, as evidenced by the many sharp turns in his life and literary career. Born in 1927 in Langsington, Missouri, he studied at the Kansas Technical University, fought in World War II as a corporal of the US Navy, and worked as a chemical engineer after the war. Around the same time, he showed himself as an active fan of science fiction, began to travel to SF conventions, began writing for magazines - and as a result, since 1955, he began to earn his daily bread through literary labor. Judging by the memoirs of contemporaries, he was very violent in temperament and therefore quickly earned a reputation as perhaps the biggest boozer, drunkard and womanizer in the American fandom. Real legends circulated about his adventures of that time. At the same time, however, he did not make enemies for himself, and therefore, for all his shortcomings, he was a kind and pleasant person in communication and because, working in fits and starts, he wrote a lot, was published often, and his works were marked with the stamp of true talent. ... Randal Garrett is the flesh of that generation of American science fiction writers, which is usually associated with the name of the legendary John Campbell, a writer, editor and journalist who “discovered” such outstanding masters of American SF as Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov, A.E. Van Vogt and a lot others. Garrett`s first publication took place in Campbell`s magazine "Estounding Science Fiction" in 1944, and in the future, all of his most significant works were published on the pages of this magazine. Several stages can be clearly traced in Garrett`s work. In the 50s, he was, as they say, a day laborer writer, published exclusively in magazines, and under many pseudonyms. Co-authorship with an equally young and equally prolific author, Robert Silverberg, with whom they formed a real "literary factory", sometimes issuing several texts a week, also belongs to this time. However, out of everything they wrote together, only two novels came out in book editions, while the rest of the things remained forever “buried in periodicals”. After the creative union with Silverberg broke up, Garrett wrote for some time in collaboration with Lawrence M. Jennifer under the pseudonym Mark Phillips ; the fruit of their joint efforts was the trilogy about psi-energy and the novel "Pagan Passions". However, Randal Garrett`s talent was revealed most fully in the 60s, when he began to work solo. It was then, in 64, that the Analog magazine began publishing works from the cycle about Lord Darcy. According to most Western critics, this cycle is the best that Garrett has written in his entire life. Undoubtedly, this cycle, organically combining the features of such seemingly incompatible genres as alternative historical fiction, magic fantasy and classic detective in the manner of Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie, is now included in the “golden fund” of fantastic literature. Other works of Garrett of that time - stories, novellas, novels, also enjoyed success, but, alas, they did not acquire cult status. Garrett also gained fame in the literary world as the author of masterly written poetic and prose parodies of many popular works of science fiction. These parodies he read out loud at conventions with a large gathering of people, published in magazines, and later compiled two collections of them. At the end of the 60s, in the prime of his career, Garrett made perhaps the most unexpected turn in his life - he stopped writing, became a priest and disappeared from the sight of numerous friends and admirers for almost a decade. Nevertheless, knowing his character, many hoped that life and literature would still take their toll. And so it happened. After marrying for the third time and parting with the church, Garrett again took up the pen. However, time was lost, and, probably, something broke in his restless soul. Everything he wrote in the 80s is a voluminous, commercially robust, but at the same time a fairly standard series of "Gandalara" in the genre of "heroic fantasy". It was published under two names - Garrett and his new wife, Vicki Ann Heydron, whom he met at one of the SF conventions. Randal Garrett died on December 31, 1987, and it was not immediately known about his death in the literary world. The obituary dedicated to him appeared only in the September issue of the analog magazine for 1988 - it is symbolic that in the same issue an obituary was also printed on Robert Heinlein, who died four months after Garrett`s death. This is also symbolic because there were, perhaps, no two writers who were so opposite to each other both in their creative manner and in their way of life - however, both of them equally belonged to the `` John Campbell generation ``, a generation that, in fact, they created modern American fiction with their own hands.  Wikipedia , Bibliography .