Agency

Agency by William Ford Gibson

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Verity Jane, gifted app whisperer, takes a job as the beta tester for a new product: a digital assistant, accessed through a pair of ordinary-looking glasses. "Eunice", the disarmingly human AI in the glasses, manifests a face, a fragmentary past, and a canny grasp of combat strategy. Realizing that her cryptic new employers don`t yet know how powerful and valuable Eunice is, Verity instinctively decides that it`s best they don`t. Meanwhile, a century ahead in London, in a different time line entirely, Wilf Netherton works amid plutocrats and plunderers, survivors of the slow and steady apocalypse known as the jackpot. His boss, the enigmatic Ainsley Lowbeer, can look into alternate pasts and nudge their ultimate directions. Verity and Eunice are her current project. Wilf can see what Verity and Eunice can`t: their own version of the jackpot, just around the corner, and the roles they both may play in it.

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William Ford Gibson

A book by William Ford Gibson

William Gibson American science fiction writer Born March 17, 1948. Since 1968 he has been living in Canada. He is considered by many to be the father of cyberpunk, in part because he coined the term "cyberspace" into science fiction, and also because of his novel Neuromancer, which was published in 1984 and has sold over 6 million copies. Biography Born in Conway, South Carolina. Graduate of the University of British Columbia with a degree in philology. Since 1968, he has lived permanently outside the United States - according to him, he left the United States to avoid being drafted into the Vietnam War. He entered the university to avoid the need to work - it was the easiest thing for him to study. Since 1972, he settled in Vancouver (Pacific coast of Canada), where he began to write science fiction. Gibson`s early works are mostly futuristic stories about the penetration of cybernetics into human life and the impact of cyberspace (a reality created by a computer) on humani...

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William Gibson American science fiction writer Born March 17, 1948. Since 1968 he has been living in Canada. He is considered by many to be the father of cyberpunk, in part because he coined the term "cyberspace" into science fiction, and also because of his novel Neuromancer, which was published in 1984 and has sold over 6 million copies. Biography Born in Conway, South Carolina. Graduate of the University of British Columbia with a degree in philology. Since 1968, he has lived permanently outside the United States - according to him, he left the United States to avoid being drafted into the Vietnam War. He entered the university to avoid the need to work - it was the easiest thing for him to study. Since 1972, he settled in Vancouver (Pacific coast of Canada), where he began to write science fiction. Gibson`s early works are mostly futuristic stories about the penetration of cybernetics into human life and the impact of cyberspace (a reality created by a computer) on humanity. The first publication in the genre of science fiction was the short story "Pieces of a Holographic Rose" (1977). Gibson`s work is considered the founder of the cyberpunk style - the style that revolutionized genre literature in the 1980s (but he himself does not like to call his works "cyberpunk"). His Cyberspace trilogy, in the original English. The Sprawl trilogy (Neuromancer, Count Zero, Mona Lisa Overdrive) has attracted millions of readers. Some of Gibson`s works are co-authored with Bruce Sterling. With a sharp plot, he saturated the works with descriptions of many gadgets, but he believed that external attributes were not the main thing. He believed that the literary education he received was "only a nightmare load of theory." He saw the activity of transnational megacorporations, zaibatsu, as the driving force of globalization. At the same time, the world of the future in Gibson`s description is not a very pleasant place. The life of society in it is completely subordinated to the interests of warring corporations. Having written several novels, where Japan occupies a significant part of the narrative, he himself did not visit Japan at that time. For example, Chiba in "Neuromancer" is a fantasy on the themes of American Detroit, transferred to Japan. "Detroit is no one proud of it - it`s just a dirty, disgusting suburb," he says. Such is the world that Gibson describes in general. He wrote a lot about Japan because he talked with Japanese tourists who come to Vancouver on vacation, and their stories about a completely different culture interested him. Gibson himself considers the science fiction genre only a tool with which he can do something new in literature. And he rejects the label “inventor of the cyberpunk movement”, because he believes that labeling brings death to the genre. “I think the label will confuse lesser known authors who try to do it. There will be a lot of fighters with a massacre. There will be a lot of crafts about guys with tomahawks sitting down at the computer. Cyberpunk misses the mark, ”he says in a 1986 interview. “When the story (Red Star, Winter`s Orbit) was published, we hadn`t even thought of such terms yet,” Gibson says about the term “cyberpunk” in the same interview (by “we” he means his friend and co-author Sterling). Gibson`s prose has a pronounced socio-psychological and socio-philosophical character, he is considered one of the best stylists in contemporary American literature. Winner of the Hugo, Nebula and 1985 Philip K. Dick awards. Based on his stories, two films were shot: "Johnny the Mnemonic" (1995) and "New Rose Hotel" (1998). The author of the concept of "cyberspace" (English cyberspace), put forward an idea and was the first to describe virtual reality. Bibliography Novels * Trilogy "Cyberspace" (eng. Sprawl trilogy, 1984-1988) 1. Neuromancer (eng. Neuromancer, 1984) 2. Count Zero (eng. Count Zero, 1986, the title can also be translated as “Count Zero” - i.e. the moment at the countdown (to zero), when the expected event already occurs). 3. Mona Lisa Overdrive, 1988 * The Difference Engine, co-authored with Bruce Sterling, 1990, the name can be translated in the same way as "Differential calculator", but if you adhere to strict engineering terminology, then this is "Difference Machine") * Trilogy "Bridge" (English Bridge Trilogy, 1993-1999) 1. Virtual Light (English Virtual Light, 1993) 2. Idoru (English Idoru, 1996, the name Idoru is the Japanese pronunciation of the word idol) 3. All Tomorrow`s Parties (1999) * Pattern Recognition (novel) (English Pattern Recognition, 2003) * Spook Country, August 7, 2007 Stories * Collection of "Burning of Chromium ”(Eng. Burning Chrome, 1982), including: o Fragments of a Hologram Rose, 1977 o Johnny Mnemonic (eng. Johnny Mnemonic, 1981), filmed in 1995 o Gernsbeck`s continuum (eng. The Gernsback Continuum, 1981) o Hinterlands (1981) o Hotel "New Rose" New Rose Hotel, 1981), filmed 1998 o The Belonging Kind, co-authored with Bruce Sterling, 1981 o Red Star, Winter Orbit, co-authored with Bruce Sterling, 1983 o Winter Market (1985) o Dogfight, co-authored with Michael Swanwick, 1985 * Doing Television (1990) * Skinner`s Room (1990) * Cyber-Claus (1991) * Thirteen Views of a Cardboard City (1997) * Hippy Hat Brain Parasite Statements * I suspect I spent exactly as much time writing stories as the average person my age spends watching television - maybe that`s the secret. (from a short autobiography on the official website) * Self-developing technologies, by their very nature, are beyond human control, and their application leads to unpredictable results. * The street always finds its own use for various things. * The future is here. It`s just not that widespread yet. (another version of the statement: "The future has already arrived. It`s just that it is still unevenly distributed") Official website: http://www.williamgibsonbooks.com/