I, Ripper

I, Ripper by Stephen Hunter

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The electrifying new thriller from New York Times bestseller Stephen Hunter takes you deep inside the mind of the most notorious serial killer of all time: Jack the Ripper.


In the fall of 1888, Jack the Ripper slaughtered five prostitutes in London’s seamy Whitechapel District. He did not just kill — he ripped with a butcher’s glee — and then, after the particularly gruesome slaying of Mary Jane Kelly, he disappeared. For 127 years, Jack has haunted the dark corners of our imagination, the paradigm of the psychotic killer. We remember him not only for his crimes, but because, despite one of the biggest dragnets in London history, he was never caught.

I, Ripper is a vivid reimagining of Jack’s personal story entwined with that of an Irish journalist who covered the case, knew the principals, charted the investigation, and at last, stymied, went off in a bold new direction. These two men stalk each other through a city twisted in fear of the madman’s blade, a cat-and-mouse game that brings to life the sounds and smells of the fleshpot tenderloin of Whitechapel and all the lurid acts that fueled the Ripper headlines.


Dripping with intrigue, atmosphere, and diabolical twists, this is a magnificent psychological thriller from perennial New York Times bestseller Stephen Hunter, who the San Francisco Examiner calls “one of the best storytellers of his generation.”

281 pages, published in
Stephen Hunter

A book by Stephen Hunter

Stephen Hunter Stephen Hunter is the king of the "gunny" -thriller, ie thriller, where the main character is not only a man, but also his weapon. Hunter is not as famous and pompous as, say, Tom Clancy, Frederick Forsyth or Stephen Koontz ...

He just has his own niche, his own strong point. This is the Man with the Gun. Not without reason, our publishing house EKSMO on the covers of Hunter`s books puts the favorite quote of the writer: “Academicians write wise works. Politicians dictate volumes of memoirs. Retired generals make speeches. Intellectuals exchange ironic remarks ...

And in all this hubbub, which is an inevitable consequence of any war, its key figure remains silent and forgotten - a lonely man hiding in the bushes with a gun.

" Stephen Hunter was born in 1946 in Kansas City, Missouri. Hunter is one of four children of Charles Francis Hunter, professor of speech at the college, and Hunter Virginia Riker, author of children`s books. After graduating from Northwestern University in 1968 with a degree in journalism, he became a journalist for the Baltimore Sun newspaper. Later he worked at Sun and Washington Post. Laureate of the Pulitization Prize. Hunter never fought himself and was not in Vietnam, although at one time in the late 60s he honestly rewarded two years in the US Army as a ceremonial soldier in the Old Guard (3rd American Infantry Regiment) in Washington, D.C., and later wrote for the military newspaper, Pentagram News. Nevertheless, Stephen, with an amazing talent, manages to reveal to the readers the inner world and worldview of people who once visited the front line, and then kicked out of there into a peaceful life full of dullness and routine ...

An avid collector of small arms, a professional hunter and an active member of the NSA - National Rifle Association of America (which actively advocates the preservation of the constitutional amendment guaranteeing US citizens the right to own weapons), Hunter not only describes any "barrel" he mentions with all imaginable care and genuine love, but also perfectly understands all the tricks of sniping - the art of sniper shooting. Probably, all this together and determined the fact that the main character of the first and most subsequent hunter books was a Vietnam veteran, a retired Marine Corps sniper - Bob Lee Swagger, once an unrecognized war hero who turned into a "civilian" into a typical outlaw - an outcast ...

It would be a mistake to equate Hunter Swagger with the movie screen Rambo. Swagger is much, if I may say so, "more authentic", more vital, more authentic, more psychological ...

The very first book about Bob the sniper - "Point of Impact", which was published in 1993, became an American nationwide bestseller. Readers demanded to continue and Hunter, having finally given up the profession of a journalist, becomes a professional writer. A few words about the adaptation of the Hunter series about Bob the Sniper. Immediately after the phenomenal success of 93 "Point of Impact", Hunter received a lot of flattering offers from Hollywood producers for the adaptation of the book. But Hunter turned out to be an unusually choosy writer and only a month later agreed to sign a contract with Gregory A.

Gale (Gregory A.

Gale). Under the terms of the contract, Hunter undertook to write a film script based on his book in a short time, and Gail had to persuade Tom Berenger to star in the role of Bob Lee Swagger. according to Hunter, it was Berenger who was most in line with Hunter`s vision of the personality of Bob the sniper. The second condition was that the film had to be shot in the most punctual accordance with the Hunter`s script. It was this last condition that ruined the entire project. To the director of the film, Luis Llosa, Hunter`s script seemed too drawn out and devoid of action ...

Since the stubborn Hunter did not want to make any concessions, Gail terminated his contract. True, the producer could not refuse the idea of ​​making a film about a sniper, because he had already received serious appropriations for this picture from sponsors ...

But Gail got out of the dead end. Firstly, Michael Frost Beckner was invited to play the role of the new screenwriter, who honestly created a strong and rather interesting script (the best phrase from it: "One shot - one kill!"), Although it no longer had anything to do with the original hunter style ... Secondly, the original name "Point of Impact" was replaced by the banal "Shooter", and the movie was released under it. Hunter said about the adaptations of his films: "I hope that now these types from Hollywood will finally understand that I can only be filmed in full ...

Like Leo Tolstoy!"  u_96: Stephen Hunter More about Hunter - Wikipedia , Unofficial Web Site , IMDb .

I, Ripper PDF

Stephen Hunter Stephen Hunter is the king of the "gunny" -thriller, ie thriller, where the main character is not only a man, but also his weapon. Hunter is not as famous and pompous as, say, Tom Clancy, Frederick Forsyth or Stephen Koontz ... He just has his own niche, his own strong point. This is the Man with the Gun. Not without reason, our publishing house EKSMO on the covers of Hunter`s books puts the favorite quote of the writer: “Academicians write wise works. Politicians dictate volumes of memoirs. Retired generals make speeches. Intellectuals exchange ironic remarks ... And in all this hubbub, which is an inevitable consequence of any war, its key figure remains silent and forgotten - a lonely man hiding in the bushes with a gun. " Stephen Hunter was born in 1946 in Kansas City, Missouri. Hunter is one of four children of Charles Francis Hunter, professor of speech at the college, and Hunter Virginia Riker, author of children`s books. After graduating from Northwestern University in 1968 with a degree in journalism, he became a journalist for the Baltimore Sun newspaper. Later he worked at Sun and Washington Post. Laureate of the Pulitization Prize. Hunter never fought himself and was not in Vietnam, although at one time in the late 60s he honestly rewarded two years in the US Army as a ceremonial soldier in the Old Guard (3rd American Infantry Regiment) in Washington, D.C., and later wrote for the military newspaper, Pentagram News. Nevertheless, Stephen, with an amazing talent, manages to reveal to the readers the inner world and worldview of people who once visited the front line, and then kicked out of there into a peaceful life full of dullness and routine ... An avid collector of small arms, a professional hunter and an active member of the NSA - National Rifle Association of America (which actively advocates the preservation of the constitutional amendment guaranteeing US citizens the right to own weapons), Hunter not only describes any "barrel" he mentions with all imaginable care and genuine love, but also perfectly understands all the tricks of sniping - the art of sniper shooting. Probably, all this together and determined the fact that the main character of the first and most subsequent hunter books was a Vietnam veteran, a retired Marine Corps sniper - Bob Lee Swagger, once an unrecognized war hero who turned into a "civilian" into a typical outlaw - an outcast ... It would be a mistake to equate Hunter Swagger with the movie screen Rambo. Swagger is much, if I may say so, "more authentic", more vital, more authentic, more psychological ... The very first book about Bob the sniper - "Point of Impact", which was published in 1993, became an American nationwide bestseller. Readers demanded to continue and Hunter, having finally given up the profession of a journalist, becomes a professional writer. A few words about the adaptation of the Hunter series about Bob the Sniper. Immediately after the phenomenal success of 93 "Point of Impact", Hunter received a lot of flattering offers from Hollywood producers for the adaptation of the book. But Hunter turned out to be an unusually choosy writer and only a month later agreed to sign a contract with Gregory A. Gale (Gregory A. Gale). Under the terms of the contract, Hunter undertook to write a film script based on his book in a short time, and Gail had to persuade Tom Berenger to star in the role of Bob Lee Swagger. according to Hunter, it was Berenger who was most in line with Hunter`s vision of the personality of Bob the sniper. The second condition was that the film had to be shot in the most punctual accordance with the Hunter`s script. It was this last condition that ruined the entire project. To the director of the film, Luis Llosa, Hunter`s script seemed too drawn out and devoid of action ... Since the stubborn Hunter did not want to make any concessions, Gail terminated his contract. True, the producer could not refuse the idea of ​​making a film about a sniper, because he had already received serious appropriations for this picture from sponsors ... But Gail got out of the dead end. Firstly, Michael Frost Beckner was invited to play the role of the new screenwriter, who honestly created a strong and rather interesting script (the best phrase from it: "One shot - one kill!"), Although it no longer had anything to do with the original hunter style ... Secondly, the original name "Point of Impact" was replaced by the banal "Shooter", and the movie was released under it. Hunter said about the adaptations of his films: "I hope that now these types from Hollywood will finally understand that I can only be filmed in full ... Like Leo Tolstoy!"  u_96: Stephen Hunter More about Hunter - Wikipedia , Unofficial Web Site , IMDb .