Wheels

Wheels by Arthur Haley

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A story of the supercharged world of the American car industry. From the grime and crime of a Detroit assembly line, through to the top-secret design studios and executive boardrooms and bedrooms, the author gives the reader a study of the motor metropolis.

421 pages, published in
Arthur Haley

A book by Arthur Haley

Arthur Hailey ( Arthur Hailey ) April 5, 1920, Luton, England - November 24, 2004, Bahamas A British-born Canadian novelist who has written a number of bestselling production novels. Born in Luton, Bedfordshire, England. He served in the Royal Air Force from the outbreak of World War II in 1939 until 1947, after which he moved to Canada. After changing several jobs, he began to write books. In 1956 he became a professional writer, starting work for the CBC television channel for the drama Flight Dangerous (in print Runway 08). Following the success of The Hotel, Haley moved to California in 1965 and moved to the Bahamas in 1969 to evade Canadian and American taxes, which accounted for up to 90% of his income. [collapse collapsed title =] Each of his novels contains various financial or technical details, in addition to the dramatic relations between the characters, in accessible language, information on how a particular device or system functions and how they affect society and...

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Arthur Hailey ( Arthur Hailey ) April 5, 1920, Luton, England - November 24, 2004, Bahamas A British-born Canadian novelist who has written a number of bestselling production novels. Born in Luton, Bedfordshire, England. He served in the Royal Air Force from the outbreak of World War II in 1939 until 1947, after which he moved to Canada. After changing several jobs, he began to write books. In 1956 he became a professional writer, starting work for the CBC television channel for the drama Flight Dangerous (in print Runway 08). Following the success of The Hotel, Haley moved to California in 1965 and moved to the Bahamas in 1969 to evade Canadian and American taxes, which accounted for up to 90% of his income. [collapse collapsed title =] Each of his novels contains various financial or technical details, in addition to the dramatic relations between the characters, in accessible language, information on how a particular device or system functions and how they affect society and its individuals ... The novels show in detail the genesis of a system, its development, and inevitable problems that eventually lead to a crisis, which is happily resolved by the end of the novel. Hailey was often criticized by critics for his success as a result of multiple literary clichés, that his style was a middling crisis of anxiety, mood swings, and parallel storylines. Be that as it may, his books were very popular with readers and invariably became bestsellers. Haley spent about a year working on the plot, taking notes and drafts for about six months, and as a result, he wrote the book itself for about a year and a half. This hard work - gathering information on guerrilla warfare in the Peruvian jungle at age 67 for Vechernie Novosti (1990) or reading 27 hotel books for The Hotel - adds a realism to his writing, though some critics see it as a cover for weak literary talent. Many of Arthur Haley`s books have become # 1 bestsellers on the New York Times list. More than 170 million copies have been sold worldwide in 40 languages. Many works were filmed, and a television series was filmed based on the Hotel. A blockbuster with excellent special effects was filmed for "Airport". Hayley`s children, a Canadian citizen, lived in Canada and California. Haley himself lived in an expensive villa on New Providence Island, located in the Bahamas archipelago, with his second wife Sheila (who wrote "I Married a Bestseller" in 1978). Haley`s grandchildren are Paul Haley, Emma Haley, Charlotte Haley and Brooke Haley. The latter is a student in Northern California. Ryan Haley is a talented bass player and vocalist for the Erogenous Jones from San Francisco. Chris Haley is a recording engineer based in Seattle. ***** On November 24, at the age of 84, world famous British-American writer Arthur Haley passed away at his home in the Bahamas. He died in his sleep at his home in Lyford, New Providence. The world has lost a man who not only created the genre of the production novel, but also raised it to unattainable heights. British by birth and Canadian by nationality, Haley was considered an American writer, as all of his major works were written in American material and first published in the United States. Having managed to break into the American market, he became one of the few writers whose books were instantly sold out without needing additional advertising. Arthur Haley was born on April 5, 1920 in the English city of Luton. His mother, an ambitious woman, wanted her son to achieve a significant position in life. But at the age of 14, Hayley had to drop out of school because his parents did not have the money to pay for their son`s further education. The money, however, was enough for Arthur to be able to complete the typing and stenography courses. These skills came in handy later. At the age of 19, he signed up to serve in the Royal Air Force, wanting to become a pilot, but the command refused to satisfy his desire - Haley had no education. However, he later received an officer`s rank, was sent to Canada for training, and finally became an airplane pilot. For the last two years of World War II, he served in London as a staff officer at the British Ministry of Air Transport. After the end of the war, Haley left military service and moved to Canada - he fell in love with this country when he underwent flight training there. While working for a magazine, he met an English stenographer who had also recently emigrated to Canada. Acquaintance grew into love - with Sheila Arthur Haley lived together for over 50 years. In addition to his main occupation, journalism, Hayley began writing screenplays for television and plays. Once, while on board a plane flying from Vancouver to Toronto, Haley wondered - what would happen if both pilots felt bad at the same time? He began to play with this idea, complementing and complicating the idea, and by the end of the flight the play was ready - all that remained was to transfer it to paper. The play was named Runway 08. CBS put it on TV, and the television drama "Flying Straight Into Danger" was an incredible success. At that time, television performances were at the peak of their popularity - every Sunday, viewers clung to the screens in anticipation of new exciting dramas. The success of this play spurred Haley`s career as a playwright, and productions based on his works became hits. Later, the play "Runway 08" was used as a feature film "Hour Zero", and the author himself reworked the play into a story. After success on TV, Hayley decided to try his hand at writing, taking on the writing of action-packed novels. His first book, The Final Diagnosis, was published in 1959. From the very first steps in novelism, Haley managed to find the components of her success. This is scrupulous detailing, versatility of the image, swirling intrigue and posing social questions to the reader. Haley continued his discussion of the shortcomings of the American health care system, begun in Final Diagnosis, in Potent Medicine (1975). The downside of technical progress was touched upon by him in Airport (1968) and Overload (1979) - in the latter, Haley described the possibility of an energy crisis. Hotel (1965) and Wheels (1971) dealt with issues of racial discrimination, and Money Changers (1975) showed the underside of bank finance. But the readers in Haley`s books were attracted not so much by social issues as by a thorough knowledge of the subject of the image. Since the mid-1960s, interest in the documentary-journalistic genre has sharply increased in America. One of its stars was the writer and publicist Robin Moore , famous for his books "Green Berets" and "The French Messenger". But Moore was too controversial a figure who paid much attention to the political side of the matter, and his books often raised issues that are extremely unpleasant for high-ranking leaders of the country, and for these reasons, some of his works sometimes could not make their way to print. Haley, on the other hand, avoided raising sensitive questions by choosing the position of an outside observer. By accurately calculating the composition of the next novel and skillfully manipulating the plot threads, Haley once again proved his skill in each book, balancing on the fine line between a gripping story and technical guidance. Critics praised his novels, emphasizing that the lack of literary grace in them is compensated for by an unmistakable and comprehensive knowledge of the subject about which he writes. While working on the Money Changers, Haley managed to get permission from two large banks to study almost the entire mechanism of the work of financial institutions - he was even allowed to attend meetings of the boards of directors. Working on the draft of the Evening News, Haley, then 66, took a special course in countering terrorism in England: he took the role of a hostage, ate snakes in survival lessons, took part in training to disarm the enemy and fight indoors. After that, for almost a year he drew up a plan for the book, developed the characters of the heroes and structured the collected material. And he spent another year on the process of working on the text. And the topics that Haley wrote about were close to everyone. The average American drove cars assembled in Detroit, stayed in hotels in the South, took drugs from the pharmaceutical industry, and flew local airlines. Hayley himself did not consider himself a "serious" writer - he often said in interviews that the most accurate definition that fits him as a person engaged in literary work is "a writer." He did not pretend to be a deep psychological analysis of the heroes of his books and did not try to reveal the reasons for the conflicts depicted. In part, he owed this to his reporting background. And the main characters in Hayley`s novels were ordinary people in ordinary circumstances, which, however, sometimes got out of control. He took characters for his works from everyday life and subjected them to extraordinary tests - and thanks to this, the reader had a sense of belonging to the situation, he could easily associate himself with the characters of Haley. The writer was always proud that, in his own words, he "never invented" his characters, but "took them from real life." Such a thorough knowledge of the "internal kitchen" of the depicted object and a fascinating presentation of the mechanism of its functioning allowed Haley to occupy a special niche. It would not be an exaggeration to say that he was in fact the father of a "production" novel in the best sense of the word. But since the early 1990s, Haley fell silent for several years. Only in 1997 did the army of his admirers receive a gift - the novel "Detective". Out of habit, thoroughly studying the materials, Arthur Haley spent several weeks in raids with Florida police and gained access to the archives. The result is a classic action story with a thrilling start and dynamic action. However, after the success of The Detective, Haley rejected all requests for interviews, stating, "I said and wrote everything I could," and added that he has long considered his literary activity something of a hobby. Not to mention the fact that Haley had a serious impact on contemporary literature, giving rise to a mass of imitators, he can be considered the "godfather" of at least one other very popular contemporary American writer. This is Tom Clancy who was able to rework the "production novel" a la Haley into a new genre - "techno-thriller", borrowing from another writer Web Griffin (also a student of Haley in some way) is a thorough description of the functioning of the internal mechanisms of the army and police. Clancy is often referred to as Hailey`s "heir," and although his novels sometimes seem alarmingly overloaded with detailed descriptions (down to the technical specifications of the brand, for example), reading them is no less interesting than the novels of his predecessor. In the USSR, Haley was considered a progressive American writer and published with pleasure. If the Soviet people needed to find out what a western airport, a hotel or an evening news studio were, especially if something extraordinary was happening in these places, Arthur Haley`s books came to the rescue. I must say that Russian readers were not alone in their love for Arthur Haley - his novels were published in 40 countries in 38 languages ​​with a total circulation of 170 million copies. Naturally, Hayley`s insanely popular novels could not fail to give rise to writers in the USSR who tried to master "his" genre. But despite the abundance of material (the production topic was almost mandatory for many Soviet writers), perhaps only the Leningrad prose writer Ilya Shtemler managed to become so noticeable that they began to compare it with the original source. We can say that as a writer, Hayley died in 1997 - after all, since then he has not published a single book. But just as the artist`s soul lives in his paintings, the writer is alive while someone reads his books. And there is no doubt that Haley will be read many years after his death. 11 novels of the famous Anglo-Canadian will forever remain favorite works for lovers of good prose, and for writers - an example of how interesting it is to write on "uninteresting" topics.  Sergey Karamaev .  Bibliography Novels 1958 - Flight into Danger (Runway Zero Eight) (with John Castle) - Runway 08 (Hour Zero) 1959 - The Final Diagnosis - The Final Diagnosis 1960 - In High Places - At Your Heights 1965 - Hotel - Hotel 1968 - Airport - Airport 1971 - Wheels - Wheels 1975 - The Moneychangers - Moneychangers 1978 - Overload - Overload 1984 - Strong Medicine - Potent Medicine 1990 - The Evening News - Evening News 1997 - Detective - Detective [/ collapse]