Andromeda Breakthrough

Andromeda Breakthrough by Fred Hoyle

Purchased 102 times

See more Fred Hoyle



DOWNLOAD E-BOOK

200 pages, published in
Fred Hoyle

A book by Fred Hoyle

Country: USA Born: 1915-06-24 Biography: Fred Hoyle is a famous British astronomer, author of several science fiction novels, was born on June 24, 1915 in Bingley, Yorkshire. He was fond of astronomy since childhood, graduated from Cambridge University with a diploma in mathematics and theoretical physics, and then worked there with Rudolph Peierls and Paul Dirac. In the late 1930s, he worked on the theory of stellar evolution with Ray Littleton. During World War II, he worked in the British Admiralty on the creation of anti-radar systems. Taught astronomy at Cambridge, Caltech and Cornell, and worked at the Palomar Observatory and Mount Wilson Observatory. Together with Martin Schwarzschild, he developed the theory of the evolution of the "red giants". He theoretically predicted subsequently the experimentally confirmed phenomenon of nuclear resonance in carbon-12. In 1948, together with Hermann Bondi and Thomas Gold, he developed a stationary model of the Universe, which postu...

Andromeda Breakthrough PDF

Country: USA Born: 1915-06-24 Biography: Fred Hoyle is a famous British astronomer, author of several science fiction novels, was born on June 24, 1915 in Bingley, Yorkshire. He was fond of astronomy since childhood, graduated from Cambridge University with a diploma in mathematics and theoretical physics, and then worked there with Rudolph Peierls and Paul Dirac. In the late 1930s, he worked on the theory of stellar evolution with Ray Littleton. During World War II, he worked in the British Admiralty on the creation of anti-radar systems. Taught astronomy at Cambridge, Caltech and Cornell, and worked at the Palomar Observatory and Mount Wilson Observatory. Together with Martin Schwarzschild, he developed the theory of the evolution of the "red giants". He theoretically predicted subsequently the experimentally confirmed phenomenon of nuclear resonance in carbon-12. In 1948, together with Hermann Bondi and Thomas Gold, he developed a stationary model of the Universe, which postulates the independence of the processes of the appearance of matter and the expansion of the Universe. It is believed that it was Hoyle who first used the quickly widespread term "Big Bang", designating it as an alternative model to his own. He was also a staunch supporter of the theory of "panspermia" (the spread of life in the Universe through organic "spores" carried through interstellar space). In 1963, Fred Hoyle worked with William Fowler to develop a basic model for a supernova explosion. They considered the main physical processes occurring in massive stars (> 10 solar masses) at the later stages of their evolution: neutrino radiation, rapid compression of the central region of the star, explosion of the envelope and mantle, which is observed as a supernova explosion. A number of Hoyle`s publications refer to extragalactic astronomy - the formation of galaxies and their clusters, a single process based on the gravitational instability of diffuse matter. For his contribution to science, Fred Hoyle was knighted in 1972. He was also a laureate of the Kalinga Prize from UNESCO for the Popularization of Science (1968), the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society of London (1968), the. K. Bruce of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (1970), the Royal Medal of the Royal Society of London (1974), the Craford Prize of the Swedish Academy of Sciences "for pioneering contributions to the study of stellar evolution and nuclear processes in stars" (1997). Hoyle`s fame as a writer brought his first science fiction novel "Black Cloud", which describes the appearance in the solar system of one of the most unusual aliens of the world SF - a giant intelligent gas cloud. In addition, Hoyle penned several science fiction novels (philosophical, adventure, children`s), scripts for TV series, and popular science books. Several novels were written by him in collaboration with his son Jeffrey Hoyle. Hoyle`s works have been translated into Bulgarian, Hungarian, Mongolian, German, Polish, Serbo-Croatian, Slovak, French, Czech, Japanese. Sir Fred Hoyle passed away on 20 August 2001 in Bournemouth, Dorset.