The King in Yellow and Other Horror Stories

The King in Yellow and Other Horror Stories by Robert William Chambers

Purchased 35 times

See more Horror



DOWNLOAD E-BOOK

A treasured source for Lovecraft, Howard, and others, this collection endures as a work of remarkable power. Includes all the stories from The King in Yellow—“Yellow Sign,” “Repairer of Reputations,” “Demoiselle d’Ys,” and others—plus stories from other sources, including three early sci-fi fantasies from In Search of the Unknown. 10 total.

Editor’s Note:

The King in Yellow is a peculiar collection of semi-related short stories, the most famous of which have acquired the status of minor horror classics among aficionados of the form. For that reason, Litrix has placed The King in Yellow in its horror section. The first six stories deal to a varying degree with a common thread of a mysterious evil book, one glance at which is enough to induce madness and death. The latter stories are more or less realistic romances set among young Bohemian artists in Paris’s Latin Quarter, a thread that runs through several of the horror tales as well. Despite its fame among horror buffs, the book has seldom seen print in the past few decades, and even used editions are hard to come by. We believe this to be the first time the full electronic text of The King in Yellow has appeared anywhere on the Internet, and we are proud to be able to provide it to interested readers.

Robert Raven, contributing editor

203 pages, published in
Robert William Chambers

A book by Robert William Chambers

Robert William Chambers 1865–1933 Robert William Chambers was born in New York, Brooklyn, the son of a famous lawyer. He studied at the Polytechnic Institute, then seriously preparing to become an artist, from 1886 to 1893 he studied in Paris; his drawings were published by the largest New York magazines. Nevertheless, Chambers chose a career as a writer. In 1887, in Munich, his first novel, A Quarter, was written, followed by the famous collection The Yellow King. Later, Chambers published detective stories, thriller stories, wrote romantic prose to earn money, and since 1927 devoted himself exclusively to the historical genre. In July 1889 R.W. Chambers married Elsa Moller; their son Robert also achieved some success in the literary field. Like many American writers, Chambers did not follow in the footsteps of Conan Doyle, although Sherlock Holmes was at its peak during this time. Chambers` work is more influenced by Anna Catherine Greene - his characters are incredibly e...

The King in Yellow and Other Horror Stories PDF

Robert William Chambers 1865–1933 Robert William Chambers was born in New York, Brooklyn, the son of a famous lawyer. He studied at the Polytechnic Institute, then seriously preparing to become an artist, from 1886 to 1893 he studied in Paris; his drawings were published by the largest New York magazines. Nevertheless, Chambers chose a career as a writer. In 1887, in Munich, his first novel, A Quarter, was written, followed by the famous collection The Yellow King. Later, Chambers published detective stories, thriller stories, wrote romantic prose to earn money, and since 1927 devoted himself exclusively to the historical genre. In July 1889 R.W. Chambers married Elsa Moller; their son Robert also achieved some success in the literary field. Like many American writers, Chambers did not follow in the footsteps of Conan Doyle, although Sherlock Holmes was at its peak during this time. Chambers` work is more influenced by Anna Catherine Greene - his characters are incredibly emotional and often commit atrocities not for personal gain and not out of fear of being exposed, but solely out of passion. Chambers` hero is an amateur sleuth who does not hesitate to admit his inexperience and undertakes an investigation only because the mystery surrounding the murder hinders his personal happiness. Fans of the detective genre these days know Chambers mainly due to the novel "The Purple Emperor". The story "The Purple Emperor" was first published in magazine form in 1895 and was included in Chambers` 1897 collection, The Mystery of Choice.