Diaspora

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Greg Egan

A book by Greg Egan

Greg Egan (Gregory Mark Egan) / Gregory Mark Egan - Australian science fiction writer, one of the world leaders in "hard" science fiction. Born August 20, 1961 in Perth, Australia. As a teenager, he read books by Philip Dick, Samuel Delaney, Alfred Bester, Brian Oldiss, Isaac Asimov, Arthur Clarke, Robert Heinlein, Harlan Ellison, Urusula le Guin - they were his favorite writers. Then he switched to Kurt Vonnegut and Larry Niven, and then, gradually moving away from science fiction, he began to read David Ireland, Gabriel Marquez, Joseph Heller, Thomas Pynchon. But after reading Greg Beer`s story "Music Sounding in Blood", he returned to reading SF again. Egan decided to become a scientist at the age of six, and after graduating from high school he entered the University of Western Australia, where he received a bachelor`s degree in mathematics. After that, he decided to make his own film, using the money he earned over the years when he worked as a milk delivery truck. Having...

Diaspora PDF

Greg Egan (Gregory Mark Egan) / Gregory Mark Egan - Australian science fiction writer, one of the world leaders in "hard" science fiction. Born August 20, 1961 in Perth, Australia. As a teenager, he read books by Philip Dick, Samuel Delaney, Alfred Bester, Brian Oldiss, Isaac Asimov, Arthur Clarke, Robert Heinlein, Harlan Ellison, Urusula le Guin - they were his favorite writers. Then he switched to Kurt Vonnegut and Larry Niven, and then, gradually moving away from science fiction, he began to read David Ireland, Gabriel Marquez, Joseph Heller, Thomas Pynchon. But after reading Greg Beer`s story "Music Sounding in Blood", he returned to reading SF again. Egan decided to become a scientist at the age of six, and after graduating from high school he entered the University of Western Australia, where he received a bachelor`s degree in mathematics. After that, he decided to make his own film, using the money he earned over the years when he worked as a milk delivery truck. Having bought the rights to the film adaptation of Out of the Flying Pan (an absurd play by the British writer David Campton) for $ 1,000, Egan eventually filmed an hour-long tape on 8-millimeter film according to his own script. It was a satirical picture of a referendum in which it was decided whether the human race should destroy itself through annihilation. Egan`s family and friends were filmed in the film, and all the voice acting and dialogues were recorded later. After finishing the film, Egan used it to enroll in the Australian School of Film and Television, but after studying for about four weeks, he decided that he hated the film industry. In the next six months, Egan was looking for work, along the way, by his admission, writing several bad stories. In the end, he managed to get a job as a programmer-researcher at a hospital in Sydney, where he worked for four and a half years with doctors and biochemists, writing fantasy stories. In 1983, his first published novel was the book An Unusual Angle - a mainstream with small elements of the fantastic, about a high school student who "learned to make a movie in his head" ... In 1987, Greg Egan returned to his hometown, where for a while combined the work of a writer and a programmer. In 1990, he wrote his eighth (sic!) Novel, Quarantine, a fantastic detective story, the first book he said he was pleased with. Two years later, this novel was published, and yet, despite favorable reviews, Egan did not dare to completely switch to literary activity for some time, partly due to the fact that he always wrote very slowly and was not sure whether he could live on the fees of a professional writer. In the years that followed, Greg Egan wrote several more novels, produced several short stories, and in 1999 won the Hugo Award (as well as the Locus Award and the Asimovs Readers Awards) for his Oceanic novel, becoming one of Australia`s most famous science fiction writers. Egan writes works in the genre of hard science fiction, with a preference for topics related to mathematics, quantum mechanics, the nature of consciousness, genetics, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and the relationship between rational materialism and religion. In the last decade, panoramic visions of the post-human distant future have become increasingly noticeable in the work of Greg Egan. So in 1997, one of the author`s strongest novels came out - "Diaspora", an unrecognized classic of modern science fiction, a space opera with a Stapledonian flavor, opening up new horizons in the genre. In 2002, another very interesting work appeared - "Schild`s Ladder", the writer is actively working in a small form. In 2008 and 2010, the author`s new novels, Incandescence and Zendegi, were released. Due to some general specificity and congestion of the scientific component (such a branch is even called "hardest science fiction" in NSF), Egan`s work, of course, does not resonate with all fans of science fiction, and it can be said that it has not yet received in its entirety the recognition that definitely deserves. Author`s site: www.gregegan.net Photo from Monash University, where Greg Egan worked as a professor from 1998 to 1999.