The Briefcase

The Briefcase by Hiromi kawakami

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Tsukiko, thirty-eight, works in an office and lives alone. One night, she happens to meet one of her former high school teachers, “Sensei” in a local bar. Tsukiko had only ever called him “Sensei” (“Teacher”). He is thirty years her senior, retired, and presumably a widower. Their relationship–traced by Kawakami’s gentle hints at the changing seasons–develops from a perfunctory acknowledgment of each other as they eat and drink alone at the bar, to an enjoyable sense of companionship, and finally into a deeply sentimental love affair.

As Tsukiko and Sensei grow to know and love one another, time’s passing comes across through the seasons and the food and beverages they consume together. From warm sake to chilled beer, from the buds on the trees to the blooming of the cherry blossoms, the reader is enveloped by a keen sense of pathos and both characters’ keen loneliness.

149 pages, published in
Hiromi kawakami

A book by Hiromi kawakami

Japanese writer, biologist, laureate of literary awards. In 1994, she won the Pascal Literary Prize for her short novel "The Bear God" for her debut in small genres. In 1998, a collection of the same name was published, which received the Murasaki Shikibu Prize and the Bunkamura Domago Prize. For her work "Stepping on the Serpent" (1996), the writer received the Akutagawa Prize. The peculiar literary style and biological perception of the world make Hiromi Kawakami`s prose attractive to the reader. In her works, a woman seduces a man like a snake seduces a rabbit. "Bear God" is a frivolous, anti-realistic novella, which, according to G.

Chkhartishvili, can be called "cheeky"....

The Briefcase PDF

Japanese writer, biologist, laureate of literary awards. In 1994, she won the Pascal Literary Prize for her short novel "The Bear God" for her debut in small genres. In 1998, a collection of the same name was published, which received the Murasaki Shikibu Prize and the Bunkamura Domago Prize. For her work "Stepping on the Serpent" (1996), the writer received the Akutagawa Prize. The peculiar literary style and biological perception of the world make Hiromi Kawakami`s prose attractive to the reader. In her works, a woman seduces a man like a snake seduces a rabbit. "Bear God" is a frivolous, anti-realistic novella, which, according to G. Chkhartishvili, can be called "cheeky".