Pathfinder Companion – Elves of Golarion

Pathfinder Companion - Elves of Golarion by Paizo

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Pathfinder (full name Pathfinder Roleplaying Game) is an RPG published by Paizo Publishing . It is an expanded and modified version of the Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 rules, published under the Open Game License. Pathfinder was conceived as a game that is backward compatible with the rules of the 3-half edition, but at the same time fixes its shortcomings. Development of Pathfinder was announced in March 2008, and the game was released in August 2009. Starting from the third quarter of 2010, Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, according to research by the ICv2 site, has been ranked first in sales and worldwide popularity, surpassing the fourth edition of Dungeons & Dragons. Lead developer Pathfinder - Jason Balman. Such famous game designers as Eric Mona, Sean Reynolds, James Jacobs also took part in the creation of the game. Additional Features According to Balman, the base classes of D&D 3.5 do not provide interesting play within the same class for twenty levels. Therefore, class options have been added to Pathfinder to better adhere to the chosen role. The number of feats has been increased by one and a half times, and all characters receive feats at every second level, unlike every third in D&D. The selection of bonus feats for classes that receive them has expanded. The abilities of most classes have become possible to use more widely or more often. For example, zero-level spells are not consumed when used; barbarians gain additional abilities during rage; priestly domains give new abilities at 4th, 6th, or 8th levels; instead of an animal companion, druids can access a domain associated with one of the elements or with nature; the paladin`s laying on of hands can heal various negative states of the character; the sneak attack works against constructs, plants and undead; wizards gain additional abilities from their specialization (including "universal specialization"). The ability of priests to exorcise or intimidate undead has been replaced with the ability to create streams of positive or negative energy that heals the living and damages the undead and vice versa. This ability reduces the need to spontaneously cast healing or wounding spells, effectively providing clerics with more spells per day. Expulsion and subjugation of undead in the old way is still possible by taking the appropriate feats. Bards, paladins, and rangers also gain more spells per day. Each character gains some bonuses at each level, in addition to increasing the base attack bonus and saving throws. This eliminates the problem of "empty levels". Some classes have significantly changed their abilities. For example, the ranger received a chosen type of terrain instead of a chosen enemy (in D&D 3.5, such a replacement existed as an optional rule), and the sorcerer chooses a bloodline (dragon, demonic, elemental, and others), which gives him additional spells, feats and abilities. Classes that gain a companion creature (familiar, companion animal) may choose a different type of bonus instead. For example, wizards can take the ability to cast certain spells spontaneously instead of a familiar. Most classes gain some extremely powerful ability at level 20, which should encourage characters to play as one class without multiclassing. For example, a bard can kill with his song, and a paladin`s "crush evil" works similarly to a "banish" spell. Compatibility Pathfinder RPG is considered compatible with D&D 3.5 content. In most cases, this means adding rules instead of shortening them. Compatibility, however, is far from perfect. A 16-page booklet has been released to convert a character from D&D 3.5 to Pathfinder, freely available on the Paizo website. In general, compatibility is often sacrificed for the main goals of a new system. Other differences between Pathfinder and D&D 3.5 Although, in general, the game mechanics of the d20 system in Pathfinder are preserved, there are many differences (in addition to the above), which, according to the developers, should have ironed out the problematic aspects of D&D 3.5 and improved the balance. Hitdays of each class are tied to the progression of the base attack bonus (except for the barbarian with his d12), which gives the bard, ranger, rogue, wizard and sorcerer a higher hitday, which is essential for the character`s survival, especially at lower levels. The rules for non-damaging special attacks (sweeps, disarms, etc.) have been simplified and unified. The character gains a Combat Maneuver Bonus (CMB) that is checked against the defender`s Combat Maneuver Defense (CMD). Polymorph spells have been greatly simplified. The new Spell Groups "Beast Form" and "Elemental Body" replaced the rules for changing shape in 3.5. Shape-shifting characters no longer have to maintain separate charlists for each of their forms, or constantly consult a monster. The skill system has been simplified. Many related skills are combined (for example, Hearing, Sight and Search are combined into the Perception skill). Characters do not lose experience points. Crafting magical items does not require XP costs, and spells that in 3.5 had XP consumption as a component require expensive material components in Pathfinder. Lost levels are replaced with permanent negative levels. Removed penalties for multiclass; instead, characters are encouraged to play one class by granting additional skill and hit ranks. Characters are harder to kill: now the character dies after reaching negative hit points equal to his constitution value. A character with negative hits is stabilized with a constitution check with a difficulty of 10.

The threshold for death from massive damage is also increased. Open Playtesting Pathfinder RPG playtesting is considered the largest such event ever held in the RPG community. The beta version of the game was awarded the 2008 ENnie Gold Award. Puzzle Dice Publications This is a stub. You will be of great help to the project if you supplement and expand it. Major Books and Expansions Various rulebooks and expansions have been released for the game: Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook: 576-page hardcover book serves as the basis for current and future Adventure Path publications from Paizo Publishing and as a standalone OGL replacement for out-of-print D&D books 3.0 and 3.5 published by Wizards of the Coast. Initial demand for the core rulebook greatly exceeded the publisher`s expectations, and the first print run sold out ten days before release.

[4] Advanced Player`s Guide: This 320-page book contains expanded rules, new classes, feats, spells, equipment and combat abilities of the characters. Released August 2010.

GameMastery Guide: This 320-page hardcover book is a comprehensive guide to Pathfinder for the master, offering a variety of helpful tips, directions, and additional rules. Released June 2010.

Bestiary, Bestiary 2 and Bestiary 3: The D&D version of Monster Manuals 3.0 and 3.5 for Pathfinder. Bestiary contains descriptions and illustrations of over 350 monsters for use in the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game. Bestiary 2 (released December 2010) and Bestiary 3 (released December 2011) also add a large number of other monsters to the game. Ultimate Magic: Released mid-May 2011.

Adds a new magic character class, the magus, to the existing 14 base magic classes. Also contains over 100 new feats and spells. Expands the capabilities of base magic classes, offering descriptions of new bloodlines, domains for the druid, new familiars, and so on. Ultimate Combat: Released August 2011.

Adds 3 new base classes, rage powers, cavalier orders and archetypes for battle clerics. It also introduces a system for combat on vehicles, including carts, boats, air vehicles, and optional combat rules (hitting a specific body part, armor that works as damage reduction, new ways to change characters` health, and so on). Bonus Bestiary: The first monster for the system, introduced in June 2009. Pathfinder periodicals: The line includes the Adventure Paths, Companion and Chronicles series. Criticism Edit While a significant portion of D&D 3.5 players were enthusiastic about Pathfinder, it is often said that PF, while ironing out some of the more visible rough edges, didn’t eliminate 3.5`s deeply rooted generic balance problems. Among them, for example, the passive growth of saving throws with an increase in the level and the lack of an increase in the ability of spells to overcome them at the same time, the inequality of the abilities of the classes (for example, the above-mentioned ability of the bard for most game purposes differs little from the save or die effects of the wizard`s spells, which he acquires simply as the level rises, etc.

Awards Pathfinder Roleplaying Game was immediately awarded a number of awards after its inception, and in 2008, the beta was awarded the ENnie Gold Award for Best Free Product or Web Enhancement.

year, the game was awarded gold ENnie prizes for Best Game and Best Product, and the cover art and illustrations for the corbuk received gold and silver prizes, respectively.

In the same year, Pathfinder was named Game of the Year by the Golden Geek RPG /

Pathfinder Companion - Elves of Golarion PDF

Pathfinder (full name Pathfinder Roleplaying Game) is an RPG published by Paizo Publishing . It is an expanded and modified version of the Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 rules, published under the Open Game License. Pathfinder was conceived as a game that is backward compatible with the rules of the 3-half edition, but at the same time fixes its shortcomings. Development of Pathfinder was announced in March 2008, and the game was released in August 2009. Starting from the third quarter of 2010, Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, according to research by the ICv2 site, has been ranked first in sales and worldwide popularity, surpassing the fourth edition of Dungeons & Dragons. Lead developer Pathfinder - Jason Balman. Such famous game designers as Eric Mona, Sean Reynolds, James Jacobs also took part in the creation of the game. Additional Features According to Balman, the base classes of D&D 3.5 do not provide interesting play within the same class for twenty levels. Therefore, class options have been added to Pathfinder to better adhere to the chosen role. The number of feats has been increased by one and a half times, and all characters receive feats at every second level, unlike every third in D&D. The selection of bonus feats for classes that receive them has expanded. The abilities of most classes have become possible to use more widely or more often. For example, zero-level spells are not consumed when used; barbarians gain additional abilities during rage; priestly domains give new abilities at 4th, 6th, or 8th levels; instead of an animal companion, druids can access a domain associated with one of the elements or with nature; the paladin`s laying on of hands can heal various negative states of the character; the sneak attack works against constructs, plants and undead; wizards gain additional abilities from their specialization (including "universal specialization"). The ability of priests to exorcise or intimidate undead has been replaced with the ability to create streams of positive or negative energy that heals the living and damages the undead and vice versa. This ability reduces the need to spontaneously cast healing or wounding spells, effectively providing clerics with more spells per day. Expulsion and subjugation of undead in the old way is still possible by taking the appropriate feats. Bards, paladins, and rangers also gain more spells per day. Each character gains some bonuses at each level, in addition to increasing the base attack bonus and saving throws. This eliminates the problem of "empty levels". Some classes have significantly changed their abilities. For example, the ranger received a chosen type of terrain instead of a chosen enemy (in D&D 3.5, such a replacement existed as an optional rule), and the sorcerer chooses a bloodline (dragon, demonic, elemental, and others), which gives him additional spells, feats and abilities. Classes that gain a companion creature (familiar, companion animal) may choose a different type of bonus instead. For example, wizards can take the ability to cast certain spells spontaneously instead of a familiar. Most classes gain some extremely powerful ability at level 20, which should encourage characters to play as one class without multiclassing. For example, a bard can kill with his song, and a paladin`s "crush evil" works similarly to a "banish" spell. Compatibility Pathfinder RPG is considered compatible with D&D 3.5 content. In most cases, this means adding rules instead of shortening them. Compatibility, however, is far from perfect. A 16-page booklet has been released to convert a character from D&D 3.5 to Pathfinder, freely available on the Paizo website. In general, compatibility is often sacrificed for the main goals of a new system. Other differences between Pathfinder and D&D 3.5 Although, in general, the game mechanics of the d20 system in Pathfinder are preserved, there are many differences (in addition to the above), which, according to the developers, should have ironed out the problematic aspects of D&D 3.5 and improved the balance. Hitdays of each class are tied to the progression of the base attack bonus (except for the barbarian with his d12), which gives the bard, ranger, rogue, wizard and sorcerer a higher hitday, which is essential for the character`s survival, especially at lower levels. The rules for non-damaging special attacks (sweeps, disarms, etc.) have been simplified and unified. The character gains a Combat Maneuver Bonus (CMB) that is checked against the defender`s Combat Maneuver Defense (CMD). Polymorph spells have been greatly simplified. The new Spell Groups "Beast Form" and "Elemental Body" replaced the rules for changing shape in 3.5. Shape-shifting characters no longer have to maintain separate charlists for each of their forms, or constantly consult a monster. The skill system has been simplified. Many related skills are combined (for example, Hearing, Sight and Search are combined into the Perception skill). Characters do not lose experience points. Crafting magical items does not require XP costs, and spells that in 3.5 had XP consumption as a component require expensive material components in Pathfinder. Lost levels are replaced with permanent negative levels. Removed penalties for multiclass; instead, characters are encouraged to play one class by granting additional skill and hit ranks. Characters are harder to kill: now the character dies after reaching negative hit points equal to his constitution value. A character with negative hits is stabilized with a constitution check with a difficulty of 10. The threshold for death from massive damage is also increased. Open Playtesting Pathfinder RPG playtesting is considered the largest such event ever held in the RPG community. The beta version of the game was awarded the 2008 ENnie Gold Award. Puzzle Dice Publications This is a stub. You will be of great help to the project if you supplement and expand it. Major Books and Expansions Various rulebooks and expansions have been released for the game: Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook: 576-page hardcover book serves as the basis for current and future Adventure Path publications from Paizo Publishing and as a standalone OGL replacement for out-of-print D&D books 3.0 and 3.5 published by Wizards of the Coast. Initial demand for the core rulebook greatly exceeded the publisher`s expectations, and the first print run sold out ten days before release. [4] Advanced Player`s Guide: This 320-page book contains expanded rules, new classes, feats, spells, equipment and combat abilities of the characters. Released August 2010. GameMastery Guide: This 320-page hardcover book is a comprehensive guide to Pathfinder for the master, offering a variety of helpful tips, directions, and additional rules. Released June 2010. Bestiary, Bestiary 2 and Bestiary 3: The D&D version of Monster Manuals 3.0 and 3.5 for Pathfinder. Bestiary contains descriptions and illustrations of over 350 monsters for use in the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game. Bestiary 2 (released December 2010) and Bestiary 3 (released December 2011) also add a large number of other monsters to the game. Ultimate Magic: Released mid-May 2011. Adds a new magic character class, the magus, to the existing 14 base magic classes. Also contains over 100 new feats and spells. Expands the capabilities of base magic classes, offering descriptions of new bloodlines, domains for the druid, new familiars, and so on. Ultimate Combat: Released August 2011. Adds 3 new base classes, rage powers, cavalier orders and archetypes for battle clerics. It also introduces a system for combat on vehicles, including carts, boats, air vehicles, and optional combat rules (hitting a specific body part, armor that works as damage reduction, new ways to change characters` health, and so on). Bonus Bestiary: The first monster for the system, introduced in June 2009. Pathfinder periodicals: The line includes the Adventure Paths, Companion and Chronicles series. Criticism Edit While a significant portion of D&D 3.5 players were enthusiastic about Pathfinder, it is often said that PF, while ironing out some of the more visible rough edges, didn’t eliminate 3.5`s deeply rooted generic balance problems. Among them, for example, the passive growth of saving throws with an increase in the level and the lack of an increase in the ability of spells to overcome them at the same time, the inequality of the abilities of the classes (for example, the above-mentioned ability of the bard for most game purposes differs little from the save or die effects of the wizard`s spells, which he acquires simply as the level rises, etc. Awards Pathfinder Roleplaying Game was immediately awarded a number of awards after its inception, and in 2008, the beta was awarded the ENnie Gold Award for Best Free Product or Web Enhancement. year, the game was awarded gold ENnie prizes for Best Game and Best Product, and the cover art and illustrations for the corbuk received gold and silver prizes, respectively. In the same year, Pathfinder was named Game of the Year by the Golden Geek RPG /