Death of Kings

Death of Kings by Bernard Cornwell

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The fate of a young nation rests in the hands of a reluctant warrior in the thrilling sixth volume of the New York Times bestselling Saxon Tales series. Following the intrigue and action of The Burning Land and Sword Song, this latest chapter in Bernard Cornwell’s epic saga of England is a gripping tale of divided loyalties and mounting chaos. At a crucial moment in time, as Alfred the Great lays dying, the fate of all—Angles, Saxons, and Vikings alike—hangs desperately in the balance. For all fans of classic Cornwell adventures, such as Agincourt and Stonehenge, and for readers of William Dietrich’s Hadrian’s Wall or Robert E. Howard’s Bran Mak Morn, the stunning Death of Kings will prove once again why the Wall Street Journal calls Bernard Cornwell “the most prolific and successful historical novelist in the world today.”

320 pages, published in
Bernard Cornwell

A book by Bernard Cornwell

Bernard Cornwell (English Bernard Cornwell ) Bernard Cornwell was born in London on February 23, 1944.

He was a "war child" - his father was a Canadian pilot, and his mother served in auxiliary units Air force. He was adopted by a family from Essex, which belonged to the religious sect "Special People" (such, however, they were). He escaped from there and entered the University of London, after graduation he worked for some time as a teacher, then went to work at the BBC, where he worked for the next 10 years, starting as a reporter, and ending up as the head of the BBC news bureau in Northern Ireland. Here he met and fell in love with Julia, a US citizen. This meeting had consequences that no one at that time could have foreseen. Here is what Bernard Cornwell himself recalls: "I am afraid that the emergence of books about Sharpe was an incredibly accidental thing.

As a teenager, I read all the books about Hornblower, and I wanted to read more, but I didn`t, so I started reading historical literature, and came across on the story of Wellington`s army in the Peninsula.

I spent years looking in bookstores for books about the "land" Hornblower, I could not find anything, and decided that it would be interesting to write something like this myself.

Perhaps I would never start writing, if I hadn`t fallen in love (at first sight, in fact) with an American woman who at that time came from Edinburgh.

I then told my reporter (and I was head of the news bureau at the time) that I would marry her.

Yes, I am so and did, but it did not happen soon, and one of the most important obstacles was that Judy could not move to Britain for family reasons, and although I could leave for the States, I could not get permission to work there.

thought I`d write uh Those damn books, this work doesn`t need permission from Washington. This happened in 1979, we are already married, the books continue to be published, and I have received the Green Card.

"Cornwell is the author of a number of series of history and adventure books, among which, of course, the saga of Sharpe the Arrow is central.

http://csforester.narod.ru/page5.htm Some connoisseurs of Cornwell`s work, however, put much higher than his series "Saxon Chronicles" about the adventures in the time of Alfred the Great young Saxon Uhtred, raised by the Danes, and torn between his love for the Danes and his duty to serve King Alfred.

To date, five books in the series have been published.

The sixth is expected in the fall.An excerpt from it is on the official website of Bernard Cornwell http://www.bernardcornwell.net/index.cfm

Death of Kings PDF

Bernard Cornwell (English Bernard Cornwell ) Bernard Cornwell was born in London on February 23, 1944. He was a "war child" - his father was a Canadian pilot, and his mother served in auxiliary units Air force. He was adopted by a family from Essex, which belonged to the religious sect "Special People" (such, however, they were). He escaped from there and entered the University of London, after graduation he worked for some time as a teacher, then went to work at the BBC, where he worked for the next 10 years, starting as a reporter, and ending up as the head of the BBC news bureau in Northern Ireland. Here he met and fell in love with Julia, a US citizen. This meeting had consequences that no one at that time could have foreseen. Here is what Bernard Cornwell himself recalls: "I am afraid that the emergence of books about Sharpe was an incredibly accidental thing. As a teenager, I read all the books about Hornblower, and I wanted to read more, but I didn`t, so I started reading historical literature, and came across on the story of Wellington`s army in the Peninsula. I spent years looking in bookstores for books about the "land" Hornblower, I could not find anything, and decided that it would be interesting to write something like this myself. Perhaps I would never start writing, if I hadn`t fallen in love (at first sight, in fact) with an American woman who at that time came from Edinburgh. I then told my reporter (and I was head of the news bureau at the time) that I would marry her. Yes, I am so and did, but it did not happen soon, and one of the most important obstacles was that Judy could not move to Britain for family reasons, and although I could leave for the States, I could not get permission to work there. thought I`d write uh Those damn books, this work doesn`t need permission from Washington. This happened in 1979, we are already married, the books continue to be published, and I have received the Green Card. "Cornwell is the author of a number of series of history and adventure books, among which, of course, the saga of Sharpe the Arrow is central. http://csforester.narod.ru/page5.htm Some connoisseurs of Cornwell`s work, however, put much higher than his series "Saxon Chronicles" about the adventures in the time of Alfred the Great young Saxon Uhtred, raised by the Danes, and torn between his love for the Danes and his duty to serve King Alfred. To date, five books in the series have been published. The sixth is expected in the fall.An excerpt from it is on the official website of Bernard Cornwell http://www.bernardcornwell.net/index.cfm