Calde of the Long Sun

Calde of the Long Sun by Gene Rodman Wolfe

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The Book of the Long Sun (1993–1996) is a series of four science fantasy novels.

A young priest Patera Silk tries to save his manteion (neighborhood church and school) from destruction by a ruthless crime lord. As he learns more about his world, a vast generation ship called the Whorl, he learns to distrust the gods he has worshiped and to revere the supposedly minor god known as The Outsider who has enlightened him. He becomes a revolutionary leader and prophet.

It is a second book of series.

419 pages, published in
Gene Rodman Wolfe

A book by Gene Rodman Wolfe

Gene Rodman Wolfe May 7, 1931 - April 14, 2019 is an American author who is hailed by many critics and colleagues as the greatest science fiction writer of our time and even ...

“Gene Wolfe is the greatest living English-speaking author. Let’s say it again: Gene Wolfe is the greatest living English-speaking author! I`m completely serious. Shakespeare surpasses Wolfe as a stylist, Melville is superior to American literary history, and Dickens is more masterful in writing characters. But no one of the living authors now comes close to comparing with Wolfe in the splendor of prose, clarity of ideas and depth of underlying meanings ”(Michael Swenwick). “If any of the modern fiction writers deserves the title of Great Writer, then this is undoubtedly Wolfe ...

who reads like Dickens, Proust, Kipling, Chesterton and Nabokov, fused together, and then seasoned with the influences of a variety of science fiction writers - from Herbert Wells to Jack Vance, from H.F.

Lovecraft to D...

Calde of the Long Sun PDF

Gene Rodman Wolfe May 7, 1931 - April 14, 2019 is an American author who is hailed by many critics and colleagues as the greatest science fiction writer of our time and even ... “Gene Wolfe is the greatest living English-speaking author. Let’s say it again: Gene Wolfe is the greatest living English-speaking author! I`m completely serious. Shakespeare surpasses Wolfe as a stylist, Melville is superior to American literary history, and Dickens is more masterful in writing characters. But no one of the living authors now comes close to comparing with Wolfe in the splendor of prose, clarity of ideas and depth of underlying meanings ”(Michael Swenwick). “If any of the modern fiction writers deserves the title of Great Writer, then this is undoubtedly Wolfe ... who reads like Dickens, Proust, Kipling, Chesterton and Nabokov, fused together, and then seasoned with the influences of a variety of science fiction writers - from Herbert Wells to Jack Vance, from H.F. Lovecraft to Damon Knight ... In general, he is one of the best American authors ... Modernist or postmodernist, formal allegorist or anatomist of the human soul - he is simply a miracle, a true talent! " (Washington Post Book World). Wolfe was born on 05/07/1931 in New York (Brooklyn) in the family of a merchant. The family moved many times, and since the early 1940s settled in Houston, Texas. Wolfe still considers this state to be his homeland, and the unbearable summer heat is one of his first "fantastic" impressions. The first touch to fiction was a visit to the New York World`s Fair in 1939, held under the motto “I saw the future”: visitors were invited to look into the “world of tomorrow” with all the wonders of technology. As a child, Wolfe first became addicted to comics, and then to cheap science fiction magazines. In addition, and importantly, the school in which he studied was named after Edgar Alan Poe, so that Wolfe met the "Mask of the Red Death" and "The Raven" at the most susceptible age. At eighteen, Gene Wolfe entered a (very cheap) institute that trained veterinarians and engineers. In 1951, in the student magazine "Commentator", he published his first story - "The Case of the Vanishing Ghost." In the third year, Wolfe left training, thus forfeiting the right to a deferred draft and ended up in the army. There he spent 1952-1954 and even took part in the hostilities of the last months of the Korean War: a well-deserved battle medal is evidence of this. Many years later, Wolfe published letters that he sent to his mother from the army. Returning to his homeland, Wolfe took advantage of the right to higher education, which was given by the army service, and entered the University of Houston, where he received a degree in industrial engineering. From 1956 to 1972, Wolfe worked for Procter & Gamble; his most significant achievement in this field is his participation in the development of the Pringles chips machine. After leaving the company, Wolfe edited a special journal "Plant Engineering" for many years, after which he named one of the collection of stories - "Plan [e] t Engineering". In November 1956, Gene Wolfe married Rosemary Frances Deutsch, whom he had known since the age of four. One more, no less important, was connected with this important event: Wolfe adopted Catholicism, which he professes to this day. Many readers and critics believe that outside the religious context, his work cannot be adequately understood at all. The Wolves recently celebrated their golden wedding; over the years, they had four children - two sons and two daughters. Jean Wolfe turned to science fiction for a very prosaic reason: the young family needed money. However, the story "Dead" was only published in the magazine "Sir" nine years later, in 1965. However, Wolfe did not stop reading SF and fantasy; he was particularly impressed by Jack Vance`s Dying Earth and JRR Tolkien`s The Lord of the Rings (he even exchanged letters with the Professor). Since the late 1960s, Wolfe`s stories have appeared regularly in magazines and anthologies, including the series of anthologies, Orbit, edited by Damon Knight. It was Knight who convinced Wolfe to rework the unpublished story into a full-length novel. This is how Operation Ares (1970) was born - however, the book was shredded by the editors, Wolfe was dissatisfied with it and does not republish it. On the other hand, the stories and stories published in those same years - varied, complex, sophisticated - quickly brought Wolfe a reputation as a subtle stylist and one of America`s most intelligent science fiction writers. In the early 1970s, Wolfe created books that were immediately recognized as masterpieces: the triptych of science fiction stories "The Fifth Head of Cerberus" (1972) and the almost realistic novel "Peace" (1976), which, upon careful reading, turns out to be a mystical novel. Already the early novels of Wolfe, following the revered Nabokov, builds up as a complex system of traps for the reader: to understand what is really going on is possible only by collecting and comparing the smallest evidence scattered throughout the text. Written in the mid-1970s, The Eve of St. Catharine, set on a dying Earth in the ultra-distant future, has never been published. It became the basis for the novel Master of Torture (1980), which, in turn, turned out to be the first volume of a trilogy in the genre of "scientific fantasy" ... which, unexpectedly for the author himself, grew into a four-volume "Book of the New Sun" (1980- 1983). The success of this novel, both critical and financial, allowed Wolfe to finally step down from his editorial position in 1984 and become a professional writer. The novel “And the New Sun appeared” (1987) concludes the story of the fate of Severyan, an apprentice of the Guild of Seekers of Truth and Repentance (in common parlance - the guild of executioners), who became the ruler of the great Commonwealth, the messiah and the kindler of the New Sun. The second cycle of novels, which Wolfe embarked on in the mid-1980s, Latro in the Fog, remains unfinished. The publisher advised the writer to continue the historical and mythological story of a warrior nicknamed Latro, who lived during the Greco-Persian wars, and Wolfe returned to him recently, after a 17-year hiatus. But Wolfe returned to the universe of Severyan with pleasure: four volumes of the "Book of the Long Sun" (1993-1996) and three volumes of the "Book of the Short Sun" (1999-2001) describe the events that took place shortly before the beginning of the events of the "Book of the New Sun", but - in another star system. The finale neatly ties all twelve volumes into a single whole. From time to time, Wolfe also writes one-two-volume novels in which - especially in recent years - he plays up the usual genre clichés. So, "View of the Castle" (1990) transfers the events of the Arthurian epic to modern Illinois, "Knight-Sorcerer" (2003-2004) - an experience of heroic fantasy, the name "Pirate Freedom" (2007) speaks for itself. Wolfe does not forget about the short form - hundreds of his stories and novellas are collected in a dozen collections. An appendix to one of them was a book of poems "For Rosemary". Yes, Wolfe is also a poet, winner of the Riesling Prize for the short poem "The Computer Iterates the Great Trumps" (1977). Gene Wolfe has repeatedly taught creative workshops at Clarion seminars and taught writing courses at several colleges. For many years he has lived in Barrington, Illinois (a suburb of Chicago). “I’m trying to do what I think should be done — and no one has done it,” says Wolfe. “The most important thing is to assure the reader that things may not be what they are now. In other words, the most important thing is hope. " Neil Gaiman, a friend and co-author of Gene Wolfe, introduced readers to nine rules for reading his books. Here they are: “1) Blindly trust the text. All the answers are there. 2) Do not trust the text for a penny, no - not for half a penny. This text is an unreliable, insidious thing, and just look, it will explode right in your hands. 3) Reread. The second time you will like it more. On the third, even more. And in any case, the books change imperceptibly while you are not looking. At the first reading, "Peace" seemed to me a quiet, elegiac memoir. It turned into a horror novel only from the second or third time. 4) Wolves live there, prowling behind words. Sometimes they appear on the page, sometimes they wait for you to close the book. The musky, wolfish scent is sometimes masked by the aroma of rosemary. Just keep in mind that these are not the current wolves, creeping like a gray shadow through the wastelands. They are ancient werewolves, huge lone wolves that can hold their own against a grizzly bear. 5) Reading Gene Wolfe is dangerous. Akin to throwing knives. You may be left without fingers, ears or eyes. Gina is fine with that. Jin is throwing knives. 6) Make yourself comfortable. Brew some tea. Place a Do Not Disturb sign on the door. Start on the first page. 7) Smart writers are of two types. Some stick out their mind, while others have absolutely no reason to stick it out. Gene Wolfe is one of the latter, and intelligence is not the main thing for him, the main thing is to tell a story. He`s not smart to make you look like a fool, but to make you smarter too. 8) He was there. He saw everything. He knows whose reflection was seen in the mirror that night. 9) Be prepared to learn Wikipedia