Eichmann in Jerusalem

Eichmann in Jerusalem by Hannah Arendt

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Hannah Arendt`s authoritative and controversial report on the trial of German Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann first appeared as a series of articles in the New Yorker in 1963. This revised edition of Eichmann in Jerusalem contains further factual material that came to light after the trial, as well as Arendt`s postscript commenting on the controversy that arose over her book.

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Hannah Arendt

A book by Hannah Arendt

Hannah Arendt (English Hannah Arendt; October 14, 1906, Linden, Hanover, German Empire - December 4, 1975, New York, USA) - famous German-American philosopher of Jewish origin, political scientist and historian, founder the theory of totalitarianism. She was born into a Jewish family of immigrants from Russia Paul Arendt and Martha Kohn in Linden (Hannover, Germany), and grew up in Königsberg. She was educated at the Marburg, Freiburg and Heidelberg universities, studied with Martin Heidegger and K.

Jaspers. In 1933, after the Nazis came to power, she fled to France [1], and then from occupied France in 1941 to New York. She taught at many universities in the United States. She was married to Gunther Anders (1902-1992), they were married in Berlin in 1929 and divorced in 1937. Second time married to Heinrich Blücher. Arendt`s legacy includes more than 450 works, diverse in terms of issues, but united by the idea of ​​comprehending modernity (“thinking about what we are doing”). According to Arendt, "people, not Man" live on Earth, and the essential characteristic of man that distinguishes him from an animal is his desire to "show in deeds and words who he is in his uniqueness." She believed that the central characteristic of any society is the balance between publicity and privacy, and the violation of the harmonious relationship between these spheres distorts the normal course of human life. In totalitarian societies, the imbalance in favor of publicity maximally expands the boundaries of state intervention in human life, minimizing the possibility of a person manifesting himself in a private sphere. Arendt paid particular attention to the concept of freedom, pointing out that political freedom acts as “resistance” in the context of influence and as “dissenting personal opinion” in the context of disagreement. The potential of freedom inspires a “new beginning”, which is realized in a special section of human life activity - “activity”. Unlike “labor”, which ensures the reproduction of the biological processes of the human body and does not require the Other for its implementation, and “production”, which reproduces the inorganic body of civilization and realizes the connection between people only in the context set by the technological program, “activity” is directed at other people ... It is by realizing it that a person acts not as a “working animal” or “producing person”, but as a creative subject of “starting a new one”. In modern times, according to Arendt, the main danger to world civilization is threatened not from outside - from natural disasters or "external barbarism", but from within, since the 20th century has shown that world civilization can generate barbarism from itself. One of the phenomena that gave a direct impetus to the emergence of totalitarian movements, Arendt considers the emergence of the phenomenon of "mass" in the 20th century. “The fall of the protective walls between the classes,” wrote Arendt, “turned the sleepy majority behind all parties into one huge, disorganized, unstructured mass of angry individuals ...

They did not need to refute the arguments of their opponents and consistently preferred methods that ended in death, rather than conversion to a new faith, they promised terror, not persuasion.

" Totalitarianism is created by a combination of repression and internal self-coercion of people, the "tyranny of consistency" of totalitarian ideology. A person entrusts the production of his thoughts to this "tyranny of logic", which is a betrayal of his inner freedom. Impressed by the trial in Israel over Adolph Eichmann, Arendt spoke of the "banality of evil" of a bureaucrat who thoughtlessly carrying out his administrative functions related to mass murder. This image overturned conventional wisdom about Nazism, including Arendt`s own early reflections on "radical evil."  Bibliography The origins of totalitarianism / Per. from English Borisova I.V., etc .; after Davydova Yu.N .; ed. Kovalevoy M.

S., Nosova D.

M.

- Moscow: TsentrKom, 1996.

Vita activa, or About active life / Per. with him. and English. V.V.Bibikhin. - SPb .: Aleteya, 2000.

People in dark times: [Essays] / Per. from English and it. G.

Dashevsky, B.

Dubina. - M .: Moscow School of Political Studies, 2003.

Banality of evil. Eichmann in Jerusalem. / Per. from English S.

Kastalsky and N.

Rudnitskaya; after Zuroffa E.

- M .: Europe, 2008 .-- 424 p. Hidden Tradition: Essays / Per. with him. and English. T.

Nabatnikova, A.

Shibarova, N.

Movnina. - M .: Text, 2008 .-- 221 p. About the revolution. Translated by I.

V.

Kosich - Moscow, Europe Publishing House, 2011, 464 p. Traditions and modernity // Soviet state and law. - 1991.

- No.

3.

- P.

124-133. Traditions and the modern era // Vestn. Moscow un-that. Ser. 7, Philosophy. - 1992.

- No.

1.

- S.

80-95. The masses and totalitarianism // Questions of sociology. - 1992 .-- T.

1.

- S.

24-31. Heidegger is eighty years old // Problems of Philosophy. - 1998.

- No.

1.

- P.

126-134. Human situation. Sections 24-26 of Chapter V // Questions of Philosophy. - 1998.

- No.

11.

- P.

131-141. Organized Wine // Arendt H.

Hidden Tradition: Essays. - M .: Text, 2008 .-- p. 39-56 On imperialism // Arendt H.

Hidden Tradition: Essays. - M .: Text, 2008 .-- p. 13-38 On Humanity in Dark Times: Thoughts on Lessing // Arendt H.

People in Dark Times. - M., 2003 .-- p. 21-27. Walter Benjamin // Arendt H.

People in dark times. - Moscow: MShPI, 2002.

Source: Wikipedia

Eichmann in Jerusalem PDF

Hannah Arendt (English Hannah Arendt; October 14, 1906, Linden, Hanover, German Empire - December 4, 1975, New York, USA) - famous German-American philosopher of Jewish origin, political scientist and historian, founder the theory of totalitarianism. She was born into a Jewish family of immigrants from Russia Paul Arendt and Martha Kohn in Linden (Hannover, Germany), and grew up in Königsberg. She was educated at the Marburg, Freiburg and Heidelberg universities, studied with Martin Heidegger and K. Jaspers. In 1933, after the Nazis came to power, she fled to France [1], and then from occupied France in 1941 to New York. She taught at many universities in the United States. She was married to Gunther Anders (1902-1992), they were married in Berlin in 1929 and divorced in 1937. Second time married to Heinrich Blücher. Arendt`s legacy includes more than 450 works, diverse in terms of issues, but united by the idea of ​​comprehending modernity (“thinking about what we are doing”). According to Arendt, "people, not Man" live on Earth, and the essential characteristic of man that distinguishes him from an animal is his desire to "show in deeds and words who he is in his uniqueness." She believed that the central characteristic of any society is the balance between publicity and privacy, and the violation of the harmonious relationship between these spheres distorts the normal course of human life. In totalitarian societies, the imbalance in favor of publicity maximally expands the boundaries of state intervention in human life, minimizing the possibility of a person manifesting himself in a private sphere. Arendt paid particular attention to the concept of freedom, pointing out that political freedom acts as “resistance” in the context of influence and as “dissenting personal opinion” in the context of disagreement. The potential of freedom inspires a “new beginning”, which is realized in a special section of human life activity - “activity”. Unlike “labor”, which ensures the reproduction of the biological processes of the human body and does not require the Other for its implementation, and “production”, which reproduces the inorganic body of civilization and realizes the connection between people only in the context set by the technological program, “activity” is directed at other people ... It is by realizing it that a person acts not as a “working animal” or “producing person”, but as a creative subject of “starting a new one”. In modern times, according to Arendt, the main danger to world civilization is threatened not from outside - from natural disasters or "external barbarism", but from within, since the 20th century has shown that world civilization can generate barbarism from itself. One of the phenomena that gave a direct impetus to the emergence of totalitarian movements, Arendt considers the emergence of the phenomenon of "mass" in the 20th century. “The fall of the protective walls between the classes,” wrote Arendt, “turned the sleepy majority behind all parties into one huge, disorganized, unstructured mass of angry individuals ... They did not need to refute the arguments of their opponents and consistently preferred methods that ended in death, rather than conversion to a new faith, they promised terror, not persuasion. " Totalitarianism is created by a combination of repression and internal self-coercion of people, the "tyranny of consistency" of totalitarian ideology. A person entrusts the production of his thoughts to this "tyranny of logic", which is a betrayal of his inner freedom. Impressed by the trial in Israel over Adolph Eichmann, Arendt spoke of the "banality of evil" of a bureaucrat who thoughtlessly carrying out his administrative functions related to mass murder. This image overturned conventional wisdom about Nazism, including Arendt`s own early reflections on "radical evil."  Bibliography The origins of totalitarianism / Per. from English Borisova I.V., etc .; after Davydova Yu.N .; ed. Kovalevoy M. S., Nosova D. M. - Moscow: TsentrKom, 1996. Vita activa, or About active life / Per. with him. and English. V.V.Bibikhin. - SPb .: Aleteya, 2000. People in dark times: [Essays] / Per. from English and it. G. Dashevsky, B. Dubina. - M .: Moscow School of Political Studies, 2003. Banality of evil. Eichmann in Jerusalem. / Per. from English S. Kastalsky and N. Rudnitskaya; after Zuroffa E. - M .: Europe, 2008 .-- 424 p. Hidden Tradition: Essays / Per. with him. and English. T. Nabatnikova, A. Shibarova, N. Movnina. - M .: Text, 2008 .-- 221 p. About the revolution. Translated by I. V. Kosich - Moscow, Europe Publishing House, 2011, 464 p. Traditions and modernity // Soviet state and law. - 1991. - No. 3. - P. 124-133. Traditions and the modern era // Vestn. Moscow un-that. Ser. 7, Philosophy. - 1992. - No. 1. - S. 80-95. The masses and totalitarianism // Questions of sociology. - 1992 .-- T. 1. - S. 24-31. Heidegger is eighty years old // Problems of Philosophy. - 1998. - No. 1. - P. 126-134. Human situation. Sections 24-26 of Chapter V // Questions of Philosophy. - 1998. - No. 11. - P. 131-141. Organized Wine // Arendt H. Hidden Tradition: Essays. - M .: Text, 2008 .-- p. 39-56 On imperialism // Arendt H. Hidden Tradition: Essays. - M .: Text, 2008 .-- p. 13-38 On Humanity in Dark Times: Thoughts on Lessing // Arendt H. People in Dark Times. - M., 2003 .-- p. 21-27. Walter Benjamin // Arendt H. People in dark times. - Moscow: MShPI, 2002. Source: Wikipedia