The Sea of Trolls

The Sea of Trolls by Nancy Farmer

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Jack was eleven when the berserkers loomed out of the fog and nabbed him. “It seems that things are stirring across the water,” the Bard had warned. “Ships are being built, swords are being forged.”

“Is that bad?” Jack had asked, for his Saxon village had never before seen berserkers.

“Of course. People don’t make ships and swords unless they intend to use them.”

The year is A.D. 793. In the next months, Jack and his little sister, Lucy, are enslaved by Olaf One-Brow and his fierce young shipmate, Thorgil. With a crow named Bold Heart for mysterious company, they are swept up into an adventure-quest that follows in the spirit of “The Lord of the Rings.”

Award-winner Nancy Farmer has never told a richer, funnier tale, nor offered more timeless encouragement to young seekers than “Just say no to pillaging.”

309 pages, published in
Nancy Farmer

A book by Nancy Farmer

Nancy Farmer (English Nancy Farmer ) Nancy Farmer (née Nancy Forsythe Coe) is an American. She was born in 1941 in Phoenix, Arizona. Her childhood was spent in a rather unusual border hotel in Arizona (or, as the Americans say, on the Arizona-Mexico border). As one of the writer`s biographies says, “Farmer’s nontrivial upbringing in a society of types like rodeo cowboys and itinerant circus performers practically guaranteed a unique and colorful life that followed.” In 1963, Nancy Farmer graduated from Oregon Reed College and received a degree bachelor of arts. She had no intention of becoming a writer, dreaming of something completely different: “I wanted to be an explorer ...

to travel, meet adventures and have fun.” Almost immediately after graduating from college, she enlisted in the Peace Corps and left for India, where she lived until 1965. From 1969 to 1971, she returned to her studies - studied chemistry, first at Merritt College in Oakland (California), and...

The Sea of Trolls PDF

Nancy Farmer (English Nancy Farmer ) Nancy Farmer (née Nancy Forsythe Coe) is an American. She was born in 1941 in Phoenix, Arizona. Her childhood was spent in a rather unusual border hotel in Arizona (or, as the Americans say, on the Arizona-Mexico border). As one of the writer`s biographies says, “Farmer’s nontrivial upbringing in a society of types like rodeo cowboys and itinerant circus performers practically guaranteed a unique and colorful life that followed.” In 1963, Nancy Farmer graduated from Oregon Reed College and received a degree bachelor of arts. She had no intention of becoming a writer, dreaming of something completely different: “I wanted to be an explorer ... to travel, meet adventures and have fun.” Almost immediately after graduating from college, she enlisted in the Peace Corps and left for India, where she lived until 1965. From 1969 to 1971, she returned to her studies - studied chemistry, first at Merritt College in Oakland (California), and then at the University of California at Berkeley. Then, however, her thirst for adventure again called her on the road: "I wanted to do something interesting, so I bought a ticket for a cargo ship bound for Africa." Nancy worked from 1975 to 1978 as a technician in the biological laboratory at Lake Cabora Bassa in Mozambique. The writer recalls: “By the time I got to Mozambique, the civil war was over there, but everything around was mined. In order not to explode, I jumped from one elephant trail to another. At work, I had to be close to Zimbabwe and the borders of Zambia, which were very dangerous. When our research boat sailed close to Zimbabwe, I got up, and the black boatmen lay down on the bottom. When we were near Zambia, I went to bed and the blacks stood up. These places were also dangerous because of lions, hippos, buffaloes and snakes, but I prefer to be surrounded by predatory animals than evil people. " When her contract expired, Nancy moved to Zimbabwe. There she met her future husband Harold, who taught English at a local university. They got engaged a week after they met and are still happily married. They had a son, Daniel. They lived in Zimbabwe for twenty years and then returned to the United States. Nancy Farmer currently lives with her family in Menlo Park, California. How she decided to become a writer, Farmer told the Educational Paperback Association: “Once, when Daniel was four years old, I was reading a novel and suddenly felt that I could create such things myself. I froze, shocked by this discovery, and then sat down and wrote the story. It didn`t turn out that good, but I liked it. I was forty then ... Since then I have been swallowed up by the desire to write. I cannot explain this and I just think that everything that happened to me before was only a preparation for my real vocation. " In 1988, Farmer`s story The Mirror first won first place in the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future Contest ”of the second quarter, and at the end of the year received the gold award of this competition. Quote from another interview: “My first book, published only in Africa, was about a Californian hippie family. It was expected that such exoticism would attract interest ... but the novel turned out to be not very good. I realized that I had lived outside the States for too long and that I could no longer write about Americans. So I moved on to the African heroes. It’s never been so hard for me. “Do You Know Me?”, “The Ear, the Eye and the Arm” and “The Warm Place” were regarded in Zimbabwe as sly political comments. “A Girl Named Disaster” was not published because the publisher was having financial difficulties. In general, the most important problem was where to get more ink and paper. " The first book that came to American readers was Farmer`s Do You Know Me (1993). It told about the adventures of young heroes in Zimbabwe. The book was well received by child readers and critics, and Farmer was praised by Publishers Weekly for “opening a window into a culture rarely mentioned in children`s books.” In the 1994 children`s science fiction novel The Ear, the Eye and the Arm (1994), based on the mythology of the Zimbabwean Bantu tribes, the three main characters are mutant detectives with unusual abilities, track down kidnappers while traveling in Zimbabwe in 2194. This book was awarded the Hal Clement Award -1995 (Golden Duck), became the Newbery Honor Book -1995, received the Golden Kite Award from the Society of Children`s Writers and Illustrators. and the American Library Association named the novel "Notable Book" and "Best Book for Young Adults." In 1995, Nancy Farmer published the children`s fantasy “The Warm Place” (1995), in which a giraffe kidnapped by villains escapes, with the help of a slave boy, two cunning rats and a magic chameleon. In 1996, Farmer published a children`s novel "with elements of fantasy" "A Girl Named Disaster" (1996). The heroine of this book is an African girl who runs away from an unwanted wedding that her parents conspired about. Kind spirits guide the girl`s canoe down the river to Mozambique and help her find herself in life. This novel was also featured in the Newbery Honor Book. Nancy Farmer is also the author of three children`s picture books. Quote from an interview: “Q: Many of your books were first published in Zimbabwe. How were they received by local readers (black and white) from Zimbabwe and Mozambique? A: Perhaps black Zimbabweans like my books more than whites. They liked the local jokes in the first three books. I never got along with whites in Zimbabwe, especially with women. They considered me an ill-mannered American from the lower class, and I their - vile, vile fascists ... Q. Do you think that childhood spent on the US-Mexico border influenced your perception of Africa or eased your culture shock, and was there any what influence at all? A: Growing up in a hotel on the Mexican-American border taught me that good people are an endangered species and need constant protection. I am cool with all governments and do not like all kinds of borders. " Perhaps the most famous work of the writer is "The House of the Scorpion" (2002). This fantastic book tells the story of the adventures of a runaway clone boy, raised for spare parts, in an inhospitable world that resembles a picture from a dystopia. However, everything ends well, and the hero finds himself and finds a real family and love. The novel was nominated for “Locus” -2003 (5th place in the category “young adult novel”) and “Mythopoeic Award” -2003 (in the category “children`s literature”), was awarded the “National Book Award” (in the category “Young People`s Literature” ) and received the “Newbery Honor Book” and “Michael L. Printz Award Honor Book for Young People`s Literature”. Roger Sutton, in his review, described the book as follows: “Although House of Scorpio is nominally science fiction, it is by all accounts realistic literature, with a strong flavor of old-fashioned adventure novel, something we rarely see in our time outside the fantasy genre. " The author`s next novel, the historical fantasy "The Sea of ​​Trolls" (2004), tells the story of children captured by the Vikings and trying to survive. In an interview with Farmer, she said that her interest in Norse mythology was aroused by a book that her husband gave her. “I needed to rest after finishing House of Scorpions,” she explained. “This book was very difficult to write. I wanted something that I had never seen or done before. ” According to information from the British branch of the bookstore "Amazon", in early October 2005, "Sea of ​​Trolls" was supposed to have a sequel called "Sea of ​​Trolls 2", but so far no additional information about this novel has appeared. The writer`s stories have been published in several anthologies. including “The Year`s Best Fantasy and Horror: Sixth Annual Collection” (1992), “A Wolf at the Door” (2000) and “Firebirds: An Anthology of Original Fantasy and Science Fiction” (2003). From an interview with Locus magazine (January 2004): “... Of course, my time in Africa influenced me. Some people go abroad and want to become Indians or Africans, but I have never tried to integrate into another culture. I knew that I would never become African, Indian, Indian or anything else. I just treated everyone like people. Most of the time, I knew quite a bit. My preparation for the trip to India boiled down to reading Rudyard Kipling, and before leaving for Africa I read G. Ryder Haggard and Tarzan. I have always believed that when you go to a country where people manage to somehow survive, you just have to watch them do it and imitate them. Usually I just sat and listened to the stories of people, and in this way I learned a lot about their culture. Although I spent some time in India and Australia, I lived in Africa longer than anywhere else, and I understood the mindset of Africans ... ... One of the main themes of my work is self-confidence, the ability to cope with adversity and overcome them. In many children`s books, there is someone who learns to come to terms with some terrible situation, and continues to suffer at the end of the book. I don’t want to write books about “victims”. I want a victor, a hero or a heroine, and that`s what I write about. When my son was younger, I tried to read such books to him about the "unfortunate", and he tore them in half and threw them out the window. I quickly learned not to. He taught me what kind of books children really like. You don`t want to drive people into despair. You also don`t want to intimidate them at all, especially the children. It all depends on the age of the child, but there are some things that I do not describe in children`s books. In Scorpio House, there is a mass poisoning scene at the end, similar to what happened in Jonestown, but it happens behind the scenes. At this age, you don`t need excessive realism. If I brought this event to the fore and described everything in detail step by step, it would be too much. It would have caused nightmares in children, and I didn`t want that. So sometimes I hold back the blows. Since my audience is a little younger, I leave horrible scenes of violence for people like Dean Koontz and Stephen King ... ... In my last book, Sea of ​​Trolls, I do not write in the spirit of JRR Tolkien, but I I`m on Tolkien territory. The novel takes place in the Viking Age, and the Vikings called the Arctic Ocean “the sea of ​​trolls”. The main character must eventually go to Jotunheim, the land of the trolls, so I wrote the saga. I have carefully studied the Norse religion in order to describe it correctly. You have to be a good peacebuilder like Tolkien and the best of science fiction writers. The trick is to “pull” readers into what is happening so that they will not be surprised at it. Perhaps I will write a sequel, because there is a 12-year-old girl who dreams of becoming a berserker when she grows up, and she is such an interesting character that I really do not want to let her go just like that. Usually I don`t really like sequels, but I know that people want to know what happens to her later. " Grunt.  Science fiction novelties in Nizhny Novgorod .  Nancy Farmer`s official home page , Wikipedia , bibliography .