Wounds in the Rain: War Stories

Wounds in the Rain: War Stories by Stephen Crane

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Stephen Crane

A book by Stephen Crane

Stephen Crane (born Stephen Crane; November 1, 1871, Newark, New Jersey, USA - June 5, 1900, Badenweiler, Germany) - American poet, prose writer and journalist, representative of Impressionism, founder of vers libre in American poetry. He had a great influence on the English-speaking culture. Crane was born November 1, 1871 in Newark, New Jersey. His father, a Methodist priest, died when the boy was 10 years old. After graduating from high school in 1888, he studied further at Lafayette College, and then at Syracuse University. In his youth, he was engaged in journalism, played baseball. He started writing at the age of 15. Crane`s mother died in 1891. He moved to New York, where he rented a room in a poor neighborhood and took a job as a newspaper reporter. His skill as an essayist was soon noticed by everyone. He began to write the first big story, a story about the life of the inhabitants of New York furnished rooms. His book Maggie: A Girl of the Streets (1893) is the story of a young female worker who was driven to the panel by the icy indifference of her neighbors. The publishers rejected the book, and Crane published the story at his own expense under the pseudonym Johnston Smith. The book sold poorly, but was approved by the influential writers Hamlin Garland and William Dean Howells, to whom the writer sent copies. The latter wrote: No one has ever succeeded in portraying the fatal power of want so vividly. The book received many reviews, the author becomes famous, gets acquainted with such writers as Mark Twain and Francis Bret Garth. In those same years, he began to work on poetry, inspired by the work of Emily Dickinson, whose book had recently fallen into his hands. The poems in the collection "The Black Riders and Other Lines" (1895) are united by the motive of the poet`s wanderings and his reflections on philosophical and religious topics. Crane is the second after Walt Whitman to use the free verse technique. In style, he and Whitman are antipodes: Crane`s poems are characterized by laconicism, aphorism, bitter irony and restraint of feelings. Along with his poems, Crane wrote the book that brought him worldwide fame: The Red Badge of Courage, which is still considered the best novel about the American Civil War in American literature. The magazine version of the novel, which appeared in 1894, was enthusiastically received by readers. The book edition of the novel in 1895 brought the writer fame and financial success. In 1895, Crane went on a trip to the western states of the USA and Mexico, as a result of which he wrote a series of newspaper essays, and most importantly - such famous stories as "The Blue Hotel" and "How a Newlywed Came to Yellow Sky "(English The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky). In 1896 he published a second version of Maggie, somewhat dampening the moralizing fervor of the narrative and softening the dialogue. At the end of 1896, Crane left for Cuba. On January 2, 1897, the ship he was traveling on sank, and Crane miraculously made it to shore. Later, this story was reflected in the famous Crane story "A boat on the high seas". That same year, the novels George`s Mother (1896), a realistic depiction of the breakdown of the relationship between the prodigal son and a religious mother, and The Third Violet (1896), a romantic love story of New York artists, as well as a collection of stories "The Little Regiment" (English The Little Regiment, 1896). In 1897, Crane went to the battlefields of the Greco-Turkish War and sent reports from there to American newspapers. After the end of the war, Crane settled in England. His new literary friends included Henry James, Joseph Conrad, and HG Wells. In 1898, a book of his stories, The Open Boat and Other Tales of Adventure, 1898, was published. The next year, Crane`s second collection of poems, War is kind, 1899, was published. It includes some of his early poems, as well as texts written in the year before publication. “I declare war on war,” is how Crane described the theme of his new book, which contains both impressionistic sketches and philosophical poems. The last years of the writer`s life were darkened by tuberculosis. In addition, he could not get rid of debt in any way, which forced him to work tirelessly. He published the novel Active Service (1899), books of the psychological genre The Monster and Other Stories (1899), Wounds in the Rain Rain, 1900) and Whilomville Stories, 1900. Even the publishers pleaded with him not to work with such strain. In 1900, Crane was already basically dictating his stories and the new novel "O`Ruddy" (English The O`Ruddy, 1903, completed by R.

Barr after the death of the writer), as he was not able to write. Crane died on June 5, 1900 in Germany, in the resort town of Badenweiler, where Chekhov later died of the same disease. The posthumous fate of his legacy was more or less successful. The collection of his works includes 12 volumes (6 by Russian standards). Crane was, and remains, the consummate master of the short story under whom Hemingway, Faulkner, and Dreiser studied. The short stories "Boat on the High Seas" and "The Blue Hotel" are considered the best American short stories of all time. The novel The Scarlet Sign of Valor, which made Crane famous, is still being reprinted in millions of copies and translated into all major languages. As a poet, Crane defined the development of English poetry for a century. His influence was recognized by such poets as Karl Sandberg, William Carlos Williams, Thomas Stearns Eliot. The famous poet John Berryman has published his biography of Stephen Crane. H.G.

Wells wrote about him: Crane is undoubtedly the best writer of our generation.

Wounds in the Rain: War Stories PDF

Stephen Crane (born Stephen Crane; November 1, 1871, Newark, New Jersey, USA - June 5, 1900, Badenweiler, Germany) - American poet, prose writer and journalist, representative of Impressionism, founder of vers libre in American poetry. He had a great influence on the English-speaking culture. Crane was born November 1, 1871 in Newark, New Jersey. His father, a Methodist priest, died when the boy was 10 years old. After graduating from high school in 1888, he studied further at Lafayette College, and then at Syracuse University. In his youth, he was engaged in journalism, played baseball. He started writing at the age of 15. Crane`s mother died in 1891. He moved to New York, where he rented a room in a poor neighborhood and took a job as a newspaper reporter. His skill as an essayist was soon noticed by everyone. He began to write the first big story, a story about the life of the inhabitants of New York furnished rooms. His book Maggie: A Girl of the Streets (1893) is the story of a young female worker who was driven to the panel by the icy indifference of her neighbors. The publishers rejected the book, and Crane published the story at his own expense under the pseudonym Johnston Smith. The book sold poorly, but was approved by the influential writers Hamlin Garland and William Dean Howells, to whom the writer sent copies. The latter wrote: No one has ever succeeded in portraying the fatal power of want so vividly. The book received many reviews, the author becomes famous, gets acquainted with such writers as Mark Twain and Francis Bret Garth. In those same years, he began to work on poetry, inspired by the work of Emily Dickinson, whose book had recently fallen into his hands. The poems in the collection "The Black Riders and Other Lines" (1895) are united by the motive of the poet`s wanderings and his reflections on philosophical and religious topics. Crane is the second after Walt Whitman to use the free verse technique. In style, he and Whitman are antipodes: Crane`s poems are characterized by laconicism, aphorism, bitter irony and restraint of feelings. Along with his poems, Crane wrote the book that brought him worldwide fame: The Red Badge of Courage, which is still considered the best novel about the American Civil War in American literature. The magazine version of the novel, which appeared in 1894, was enthusiastically received by readers. The book edition of the novel in 1895 brought the writer fame and financial success. In 1895, Crane went on a trip to the western states of the USA and Mexico, as a result of which he wrote a series of newspaper essays, and most importantly - such famous stories as "The Blue Hotel" and "How a Newlywed Came to Yellow Sky "(English The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky). In 1896 he published a second version of Maggie, somewhat dampening the moralizing fervor of the narrative and softening the dialogue. At the end of 1896, Crane left for Cuba. On January 2, 1897, the ship he was traveling on sank, and Crane miraculously made it to shore. Later, this story was reflected in the famous Crane story "A boat on the high seas". That same year, the novels George`s Mother (1896), a realistic depiction of the breakdown of the relationship between the prodigal son and a religious mother, and The Third Violet (1896), a romantic love story of New York artists, as well as a collection of stories "The Little Regiment" (English The Little Regiment, 1896). In 1897, Crane went to the battlefields of the Greco-Turkish War and sent reports from there to American newspapers. After the end of the war, Crane settled in England. His new literary friends included Henry James, Joseph Conrad, and HG Wells. In 1898, a book of his stories, The Open Boat and Other Tales of Adventure, 1898, was published. The next year, Crane`s second collection of poems, War is kind, 1899, was published. It includes some of his early poems, as well as texts written in the year before publication. “I declare war on war,” is how Crane described the theme of his new book, which contains both impressionistic sketches and philosophical poems. The last years of the writer`s life were darkened by tuberculosis. In addition, he could not get rid of debt in any way, which forced him to work tirelessly. He published the novel Active Service (1899), books of the psychological genre The Monster and Other Stories (1899), Wounds in the Rain Rain, 1900) and Whilomville Stories, 1900. Even the publishers pleaded with him not to work with such strain. In 1900, Crane was already basically dictating his stories and the new novel "O`Ruddy" (English The O`Ruddy, 1903, completed by R. Barr after the death of the writer), as he was not able to write. Crane died on June 5, 1900 in Germany, in the resort town of Badenweiler, where Chekhov later died of the same disease. The posthumous fate of his legacy was more or less successful. The collection of his works includes 12 volumes (6 by Russian standards). Crane was, and remains, the consummate master of the short story under whom Hemingway, Faulkner, and Dreiser studied. The short stories "Boat on the High Seas" and "The Blue Hotel" are considered the best American short stories of all time. The novel The Scarlet Sign of Valor, which made Crane famous, is still being reprinted in millions of copies and translated into all major languages. As a poet, Crane defined the development of English poetry for a century. His influence was recognized by such poets as Karl Sandberg, William Carlos Williams, Thomas Stearns Eliot. The famous poet John Berryman has published his biography of Stephen Crane. H.G. Wells wrote about him: Crane is undoubtedly the best writer of our generation.