A Master of Mysteries

A Master of Mysteries by Elizabeth Thomasina Mead-Smith

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A Master of Mysteries is a collection of six seemingly impossible (supernatural?) cases narrated by Mr. John Bell, the well-known ghost-hunter who seeks to debunk and expose the truth behind ghosts and haunting.

In his own words, Bell “proposes to relate the histories of certain queer events, enveloped at first in mystery, and apparently dark with portent, but, nevertheless, when grappled with in the true spirit of science, capable of explanation."

"The Mystery of the Circular Chamber" involves Bell investigating the strange death of Archibald Wentworth in a supposedly haunted bedroom of the rural Tower Inn, a hostelry whose three occupants are anything but welcoming.

The next story involves the Clinton family, which, as happens so often in mysteries, lives in what was once an abbey. (And as is often the case, there`s a terrible curse on the family.)

Four other equally haunting tales soon follow.


L.T. MEADE (Elizabeth Meade Smith) (1844–1914) wrote in a variety of genres, including mysteries and occult detective stories.

ROBERT EUSTICE (Eustace Robert Barton) (1854–1943) was an English doctor and author of mystery and crime fiction that explored themes of scientific phenomena.

126 pages, published in
Elizabeth Thomasina Mead-Smith

A book by Elizabeth Thomasina Mead-Smith

Elizabeth Thomasina Meade Smith (English Elizabeth Thomasina Meade Smith ) 1854-1943 British writer. Published under the pseudonym L.T. Meade ( LT Meade ). During the Victorian era, it often happened that a woman writer preferred to sign her works with a male name (such as George Eliot) or with meaningless initials. Women`s creativity was considered less serious than men`s, and writers had to resort to tricks. This is exactly what happened to Elizabeth Thomasina Mead-Smith. She was born in 1844 in Ireland to a Protestant priest. Elizabeth`s desire to write began at an early age, which terrified her father - the women in their family never earned a living by their labor. But the ambitious girl went to London. Spending a lot of time in the reading room of the British Museum, she independently prepared herself for a writing career. Her first works appeared in 1861 - when Elizabeth was 17 years old ...

She worked under the pseudonym L.T. Mead is gender neutral, we would say now. Most often, she created stories for girls - this genre was extremely popular in Victorian England. Moreover, Mead was the editor-in-chief of the girls` magazine Atlanta for a while. The most famous are her novels for girls and women, which immediately began to enjoy immense popularity (some of them appeared in the Little Women series - Girl`s World, School Queen, Wonderful Castle, etc.). Elizabeth Mead-Smith is rightfully considered the "progenitor" of such a trend in literature as "school novels." The writer tried her hand at other genres, creating a number of historical, adventure and detective novels and stories. Her literary heritage is enormous - 300 works, including short stories and magazine articles. *** However, the writer did not limit herself to edifying stories for the younger generation. Under the same name, she published co-authored detective novels and short stories. Her most frequent partner was Robert Eustace, and this is also a pseudonym, his real name is Eustace Robert Barton. In ordinary life, he was a simple doctor (however, like many other writers of this genre, starting with Conan Doyle), and he wrote detective stories exclusively under various pseudonyms and also almost always in co-authorship. As we can see, Victorian duality manifested itself not only in creativity, but even in the names of the authors of the "criminal genre". Together, Mead and Eustace wrote a number of works where the main characters either break the law or help him: a very remarkable fact, given the main occupation of Mrs.

Mead - working in a magazine for well-bred girls. This is how demonic criminals such as Madame Sarah from the successful Enchantress Strand series appeared. In opposition to them, the heroine of another cycle arose - Miss Florence Cusack, who regularly "renders services" to Scotland Yard in solving puzzling riddles. Intuition is the main, truly feminine, weapon of this lady detective. The audience favorably greeted the detectives in a skirt (maybe that`s why they appeared in books earlier than in real life), so stories about Miss Cusack gained considerable popularity. © I.

Mokin. Not only Holmes, 2008.

Lib.ru/Classics. Mead-Smith Elizabeth. Selected Works , Wikipedia (en.)

A Master of Mysteries PDF

Elizabeth Thomasina Meade Smith (English Elizabeth Thomasina Meade Smith ) 1854-1943 British writer. Published under the pseudonym L.T. Meade ( LT Meade ). During the Victorian era, it often happened that a woman writer preferred to sign her works with a male name (such as George Eliot) or with meaningless initials. Women`s creativity was considered less serious than men`s, and writers had to resort to tricks. This is exactly what happened to Elizabeth Thomasina Mead-Smith. She was born in 1844 in Ireland to a Protestant priest. Elizabeth`s desire to write began at an early age, which terrified her father - the women in their family never earned a living by their labor. But the ambitious girl went to London. Spending a lot of time in the reading room of the British Museum, she independently prepared herself for a writing career. Her first works appeared in 1861 - when Elizabeth was 17 years old ... She worked under the pseudonym L.T. Mead is gender neutral, we would say now. Most often, she created stories for girls - this genre was extremely popular in Victorian England. Moreover, Mead was the editor-in-chief of the girls` magazine Atlanta for a while. The most famous are her novels for girls and women, which immediately began to enjoy immense popularity (some of them appeared in the Little Women series - Girl`s World, School Queen, Wonderful Castle, etc.). Elizabeth Mead-Smith is rightfully considered the "progenitor" of such a trend in literature as "school novels." The writer tried her hand at other genres, creating a number of historical, adventure and detective novels and stories. Her literary heritage is enormous - 300 works, including short stories and magazine articles. *** However, the writer did not limit herself to edifying stories for the younger generation. Under the same name, she published co-authored detective novels and short stories. Her most frequent partner was Robert Eustace, and this is also a pseudonym, his real name is Eustace Robert Barton. In ordinary life, he was a simple doctor (however, like many other writers of this genre, starting with Conan Doyle), and he wrote detective stories exclusively under various pseudonyms and also almost always in co-authorship. As we can see, Victorian duality manifested itself not only in creativity, but even in the names of the authors of the "criminal genre". Together, Mead and Eustace wrote a number of works where the main characters either break the law or help him: a very remarkable fact, given the main occupation of Mrs. Mead - working in a magazine for well-bred girls. This is how demonic criminals such as Madame Sarah from the successful Enchantress Strand series appeared. In opposition to them, the heroine of another cycle arose - Miss Florence Cusack, who regularly "renders services" to Scotland Yard in solving puzzling riddles. Intuition is the main, truly feminine, weapon of this lady detective. The audience favorably greeted the detectives in a skirt (maybe that`s why they appeared in books earlier than in real life), so stories about Miss Cusack gained considerable popularity. © I. Mokin. Not only Holmes, 2008. Lib.ru/Classics. Mead-Smith Elizabeth. Selected Works , Wikipedia (en.)