Mojave Crossing

Mojave Crossing by Louis Lamour

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In Mojave Crossing, Louis L’Amour takes William Tell Sackett on a treacherous passage from the Arizona goldfields to the booming town of Los Angeles.


Tell Sackett was no ladies’ man, but he could spot trouble easily enough. And Dorinda Robiseau was the kind of trouble he wanted to avoid at any time—even more so when he had thirty pounds of gold in his saddlebags and a long way to travel. But when she begged him for safe passage to Los Angeles, Sackett reluctantly agreed. Now he’s on a perilous journey through the most brutal desert on the continent, traveling with a companion he doesn’t trust . . . and headed for a confrontation with a deadly gunman who also bears the name of Sackett.

120 pages, published in
Louis Lamour

A book by Louis Lamour

Louis L`Amour USA, 3/22/1908 - 7/10/1988 He was born Louis Darborn LaMour in Jamestown, North Dakota. His father was a veterinarian, horse and dog lover, a sturdy athlete who taught boxing to his three sons. His mother, who kept the family hearth, was known as an avid reader and great storyteller. The family had a library of 300 books, and young Louis read avidly. He also frequently visited the city library. He read books from Shakespeare to Xen Gray, from Charles Dickens to Jack London - he loved to read. The family fell into rough times in the 1920s and he traveled southwest in 1923.

Louis left home at the age of 15, not wanting to be a burden to the family. Since that time, he has gone through an amazing series of works and activities, valuable for the future writer. He was an animal drover in Texas, went to sea and lived in the Far East, served on the East Indian schooner, was a professional boxer, dockman, lumberjack, elephant trainer, fruit gatherer, gold digger and t...

Mojave Crossing PDF

Louis L`Amour USA, 3/22/1908 - 7/10/1988 He was born Louis Darborn LaMour in Jamestown, North Dakota. His father was a veterinarian, horse and dog lover, a sturdy athlete who taught boxing to his three sons. His mother, who kept the family hearth, was known as an avid reader and great storyteller. The family had a library of 300 books, and young Louis read avidly. He also frequently visited the city library. He read books from Shakespeare to Xen Gray, from Charles Dickens to Jack London - he loved to read. The family fell into rough times in the 1920s and he traveled southwest in 1923. Louis left home at the age of 15, not wanting to be a burden to the family. Since that time, he has gone through an amazing series of works and activities, valuable for the future writer. He was an animal drover in Texas, went to sea and lived in the Far East, served on the East Indian schooner, was a professional boxer, dockman, lumberjack, elephant trainer, fruit gatherer, gold digger and tank officer in World War II. After the end of the war, Lamour settled in Los Angeles with the intention of becoming a writer of Westerns, then very popular in America, although he also tried to write a detective novel. He published many short stories in the years 1946-1950. In 1950 he published his first novel, "Flowing to the West." He published four books by Hopalong Cassidy between 1950 and 1954 under the pseudonym Tex Burns. He used the pseudonym Jim Mayo to publish two other books, Yellow Butt in 1953 and Utah Bline in 1954. In 1953 he published Hondo, which became a bestseller. It was quickly remade into a film starring the famous John Wayne. Until 1981, Hondo sales reached 2,300,000 and are still growing. Lamour became America`s most popular writer. All of his novels, and he has written over 100, are still in print. Total sales reached 225,000,000. Between 1953 and 1971, thirty of his novels were filmed. In 1982 he was awarded the Congressional (National) Gold Medal and in 1984 the Medal of Freedom. In 1972 he was awarded an honorary doctorate in literature from Jamestown College, his hometown. Realizing that education is the key to success and a good life, and because of his passion for history and knowledge, Louis was a member of many organizations, including: Writers` Union of America (West) Writers of American Westerns Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences American Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics California Academy of Sciences California Writers` Union Lamour has always considered himself "just a storyteller, a guy sitting by a campfire." His novels are known for their authenticity and accuracy, their descriptions, their extensive lectures, partly about the history of the American West, their endless tidbits, excitement and entertainment. Readers ignore the odd stories and flaws that demonstrate his demand to never correct his stories. Lamour died on June 10, 1988 in Los Angeles. © RIN.RU Essays about L. Lamur from Max Goncharov - http://www.netslova.ru/goncharov/lamoore.html Films based on Lamour`s books - http://www.kinopoisk.ru/name/184950