The Weird of the White Wolf

The Weird of the White Wolf by Michael Moorcock

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 The third book in the Elric series introduces the reader to Moonglum, Elric`s longtime companion. Much of the second novel moved away from the events of the first, and concentrated Elric`s character on other adventures. The Weird of the White Wolf brings Elric back to Melniboné along with Moonglum, their friend Smiorgan Baldhead, and an army of raiders bent on overthrowing Yyrkoon, who stole the throne when Elric left Melnibonл for a year to travel the world. For those wondering, whether you`ve read the book or not: the “weird” of the title is an archaic definition of the term, given by Merriam Webster as “One`s assigned lot or fortune, especially when evil.” And when he finds it, he`s not all that happy about it. But that`s to be expected when one`s antihero has a crisis of conscience.

Certainly not a slow book by any means, nor a weak one in the context of the series. And it`s definitely a necessity as a prelude to what comes after it.

111 pages, published in
Michael Moorcock

A book by Michael Moorcock

Michael John Moorcock ( Michael John Moorcock ) was born on December 18, 1939 in the small town of Mitchham (Surrey) in the family of an engineer. As a child, he moved to London and lived there until 1993. The writer`s childhood and adolescence fell on a special period - the collapse of the British Empire (not so long ago, we ourselves experienced something similar - only yesterday we lived in a powerful state, and suddenly, in a couple of years, the empire crumbles to dust). It is from here that the roots of one of the main themes in his work grow - the idea of ​​an eternal, incessant struggle with the coming Chaos, the history of the destruction of the usual system of the universe and a long, painful adaptation to the new one. In fact, having lost his family early (his parents divorced), Moorcock began an independent life as a teenager. After serving in the RAF, he graduates from the prestigious Pitmans College, after which he plunges headlong into bohemian life. From a y...

The Weird of the White Wolf PDF

Michael John Moorcock ( Michael John Moorcock ) was born on December 18, 1939 in the small town of Mitchham (Surrey) in the family of an engineer. As a child, he moved to London and lived there until 1993. The writer`s childhood and adolescence fell on a special period - the collapse of the British Empire (not so long ago, we ourselves experienced something similar - only yesterday we lived in a powerful state, and suddenly, in a couple of years, the empire crumbles to dust). It is from here that the roots of one of the main themes in his work grow - the idea of ​​an eternal, incessant struggle with the coming Chaos, the history of the destruction of the usual system of the universe and a long, painful adaptation to the new one. In fact, having lost his family early (his parents divorced), Moorcock began an independent life as a teenager. After serving in the RAF, he graduates from the prestigious Pitmans College, after which he plunges headlong into bohemian life. From a young age, Moorcock played the guitar and other instruments well, and the Beatlemania that swept England and the entire Western world at that time influenced the choice of life - in the early 70s he joined the Hawkwind group, whose repertoire included many of his own songs and compositions. He was fond of Moorcock and politics. In the early 1960s, he joined the radical left and for two years edited the newspaper of the Liberal Party, the magazine "Current Topics". Later, he became an anarchist altogether, and even published in 1983 a harsh publicistic book "Departure from Freedom: The Erosion of Democracy in Modern Britain." In the early 1960s, the future editor and writer married for the first time (he was married 4 times; the last time was in 1983) - to the journalist and science fiction writer Hilary Bailey. He lived with her for 16 years, becoming the father of two daughters and a son. Although with the group "Hawkwind" Murcock collaborated in the future, his finest hour did not come on stage. The future writer eagerly devoured (and wrote) science fiction from early childhood. At the same time, Michael very early discovered in himself a rather rare gift - he turned out to be a talented editor. At first he worked in amateur fanzines, where he actively published himself (his first magazine was called "The Adventures of Tarzan", and was headed by Murcock at the age of 18). It was on the pages of this self-made publication that the first series of Murcock in the genre of "heroic fantasy" was published, which began in the May issue of 1957 with the story "Sojan the sword-bearer" (in 1977 the stories of the series were combined under one cover in the collection "Sojan") ... However, the main livelihood was still provided by music (he also moonlighted as an editor in one publishing house of detective literature). Everything changed when Michael met Ted Carnell, editor of many professional British science fiction magazines, spiritual leader and unquestioning authority of the British fandom. This meeting became fateful, both for Moorcock and for Carnell himself and his brainchild - the leading English science fiction magazine New Worlds, founded back in 1946. At first, Michael himself began to write regularly for magazines, then headed by Carnell, - "SF Adventures" and "Science Fantasy", and quickly achieved some success with readers, - just by book editions, and not in periodicals, volumes of the "Martian" trilogy, created in imitation of E.R. Burroughs (it was published in 1965 under the pseudonym Edward P. Bradbury). And in 1964, New Worlds magazine unexpectedly closed, and Carnell left his editorial post. But, a few months later, the publication resumed work with a new editor - twenty-four-year-old Michael John Moorcock. After that, during the seven years that shook the world of science fiction, New Worlds became the mouthpiece of an entire literary movement - the so-called. "New Wave". Even in his youth, Moorcock argued heatedly with other fans, arguing that modern fiction, to be called Literature, lacks general literary literacy and culture, as well as the "human dimension." What he meant by these concepts became clear as soon as he had the opportunity to demonstrate this in the pages of his own magazine. The main basis of "New Wave" was a sharply aggressive rejection of "classic" science fiction. Therefore, the writers-apologists of the movement represented a rather motley palette of various literary trends fashionable at that time. The most famous representatives of the movement, besides Moorcock himself, were the British Brian Aldiss, James Graham Ballard, John Brunner, Michael John Harrison, John Sladeck, Christopher Priest and the Americans Thomas Disch, Norman Spinrad, Samuel Delaney, Roger Zelazny and Harlan Ellison (as you see , authors very different in style). Throughout the years while Moorcock edited New Worlds, he never stopped writing. But, only in the mid-1970s, when the Wave subsided, critics and readers "discovered" a new writer - very prolific, diverse, consistent in carrying out some of his obsessions, as well as intelligent, ironic and stylistically "equipped" for any taste. From the very first works, he set about creating a completely unprecedented super-series, covering, according to the author, all his works. For this, however, it was necessary to develop the concept of the Multiverse (a term borrowed from the prominent English prose writer John Cowper Powis), in which various parallel worlds coexist, constantly intersecting with each other. The novels of this megacycle are written in different genres - here and "hard" SF, and fantasy, and the novel of the absurd, and alternative history, and decadence, and "space opera", and even detective or realistic prose. The heroes of the books freely migrate from novel to novel, eventually forming a rich polyphonic whole (which was also facilitated by the frequent rewriting of early works by the author). [All this makes compiling a bibliography of Moorcock`s books a hell of a job!] Moorcock has created several series of a rather specific "heroic fantasy". However, the writer never hid the fact that he wrote fantasy series for the money, which, basically, he needed to keep his magazine afloat. However, his series turned out to be very non-standard and multi-sense. One has only to take a closer look at his heroes - unlike the undoubted supermen Burroughs, Howard and other founders of "heroic fantasy", the heroes of Moorcock are usually restless, lonely, possessed by dark passions, phobias and other clearly non-superman qualities. In short, they are people without any prefixes "super" (we can say that it is Murcock who stands at the origin of modern "heroics"). Peru also belongs to the critical work on the fantasy genre - "Wizardry and Wild Romance: A Study of Epic Fantasy" (1987). Currently, Moorcock lives in a small town in Texas (USA, since 1993), in his free time collecting rare books from the late 19th - early 20th centuries, he is also fond of hiking, music and painting. He is the recipient of the Nebula, the World Fantasy Prize and three times the British Fantasy Prize. A number of comics and video games have been created based on his books.  Tanelorn Fan Site - http://www.moorcock.narod.ru/ Recommended the order of reading books about the Eternal Warrior: I. Chronicles of Erekoz 01 - Eternal Warrior 02 - Phoenix in obsidian 03 - Order of Darkness II. Chronicles of Corum. Lords of Swords 01 - Knight of Swords 02 - Queen of Swords 03 - King of Swords III. The Chronicles of Corum. Silver Hand 01 - Bull and Spear 02 - Oak and Ram 03 - Sword and Horse IV. The Chronicles of Dorian Hawkmoon. Rune Staff 01 - The Death Bringing Crystal 02 - Amulet of the Mad God 03 - Sword of Dawn 04 - Rune Staff V. The Chronicles of Dorian Hawkmoon. Earl Brass 01 - Earl Brass 02 - Defender of Garathorm 03 - Finding Taneelorn VI. The Chronicles of Elric. Phantom City 01 - Phantom City 02 - Chaos Knight 03 - Eyes of the Jasper Giant 04 - Beyond the End of the World VII. The Chronicles of Elric. Song of the Black Sword 01 - Wanderer on the Seas of Fate 02 - Fall of the Haunted City 03 - While the Gods Laugh 04 - Singing Citadel 05 - Elric at the Edge of Time VIII. The Chronicles of Elric. Pearl Fortress 01 - Pearl Fortress 02 - Revenge of the Rose IX. The Chronicles of Elric. Tales of the Albino 01 - The Daughter of the Thief of Dreams 02 - The Skreling Tree 03 - The Son of the White Wolf X. Dancers at the Edge of Time 01 - Alien Warmth 02 - Empty Lands 03 - The End of All Songs XI. Tales of the Edge of Time 01 - Pale Roses 02 - White Stars 03 - Ancient Shadows 04 - Eternal Flame 05 - Elric at the Edge of Time XII. Nomads of Time 01 - The Lord of the Air 02 - Leviathan walks on the ground 03 - The Steel King XIII. The Chronicles of the Von Beck Family 01 - The Dog of War and the Pain of the World 02 - The City in Autumn Stars 03 - House on Rosenstrasse