An Old-Fashioned Girl

An Old-Fashioned Girl by Louise May Alcott

Purchased 100 times

See more Classic Prose



DOWNLOAD E-BOOK

278 pages, published in
Louise May Alcott

A book by Louise May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott (eng.

Louisa May Alcott ; November 29, 1832 - March 6, 1888) is an American writer who became famous for her novel Little Women, published in 1868, which was founded on the memories of her growing up in the company of three sisters.  Childhood, the beginning of creative activity Louise May Alcott was the second of four daughters of the transcendentalist writer Amos Bronson Alcott and suffragette Abby May. The Olcott family came from New England, but Louise was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. When the girl was two years old, the family moved to Boston, where Amos Bronson Olcott founded an experimental school and joined the transcendentalist club led by Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. After several school failures, the Olcott moved to Concord, Massachusetts, where they joined the transcendental Utopian settlement Fruitlands. Louise was educated under her father; her circle of friends also greatly influenced her: Emerson, Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller. She wrote about this in the essay "Transcendental Wild Oats", in 1876 reprinted in the book "Silver Pitchers" on the time spent by the Olcott in the Fruitlands. As she grew older, Louise Alcott became a follower of abolitionism and feminism. Due to the plight of her family, she started working early (she was a governess, teacher, seamstress). Since childhood, she was fond of literature, wrote short stories and fairy tales, wrote plays for home theater. At 22, Louise wrote her first book, Flower Fables, which included stories written for Ellen Emerson, daughter of Ralph Waldo Emerson. During the Civil War, she served as a nurse at a military hospital in Georgetown. In 1863, her letters to relatives, which she sent from the hospital, were published in a revised form, and this book brought her first, albeit not very wide, fame.  Gaining popularity and later life In 1868, Olcott`s most famous and popular book, Little Women, was published, which tells the story of the growing up of the four daughters of the March family: Mag, Joe, Beth and Amy. It was created at the request of Boston publisher Thomas Niles, who asked Olcott to write a "book for girls." Her older sister Anna served as the prototype for Meg, she expressed herself in the image of Joe, and the images of Beth and Amy were based on her younger sisters Elizabeth and May, respectively. The success of the book prompted the writer to write several novels related to this work: in 1869, a sequel was published entitled "Good Wives", which is often published along with the first part of the novel and tells about the youth of the March sisters and their marriage; in 1871 the book "Little Men" was published, also semi-autobiographical, telling about the nephews of the writer; finally, in 1886, Joe`s Boys came out. In addition, many of Olcott`s later stories and novellas echoed Little Women. Unlike Joe March, her literary incarnation, Louise May Alcott has never been married. In 1879, after the death of her sister May, the writer brought up her two-year-old niece Louise May Neriker (she was named after her aunt and even received the same family nickname - Lulu). Olcott later became a women`s rights activist and was the first woman to register for elections in Concord, Massachusetts. Despite her deteriorating health, Olcott continued to write until her death. She died in Boston on March 6, 1888 from the effects of prolonged mercury poisoning (due to typhoid fever, she took calomel for a long time).

An Old-Fashioned Girl PDF

Louisa May Alcott (eng. Louisa May Alcott ; November 29, 1832 - March 6, 1888) is an American writer who became famous for her novel Little Women, published in 1868, which was founded on the memories of her growing up in the company of three sisters.  Childhood, the beginning of creative activity Louise May Alcott was the second of four daughters of the transcendentalist writer Amos Bronson Alcott and suffragette Abby May. The Olcott family came from New England, but Louise was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. When the girl was two years old, the family moved to Boston, where Amos Bronson Olcott founded an experimental school and joined the transcendentalist club led by Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. After several school failures, the Olcott moved to Concord, Massachusetts, where they joined the transcendental Utopian settlement Fruitlands. Louise was educated under her father; her circle of friends also greatly influenced her: Emerson, Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller. She wrote about this in the essay "Transcendental Wild Oats", in 1876 reprinted in the book "Silver Pitchers" on the time spent by the Olcott in the Fruitlands. As she grew older, Louise Alcott became a follower of abolitionism and feminism. Due to the plight of her family, she started working early (she was a governess, teacher, seamstress). Since childhood, she was fond of literature, wrote short stories and fairy tales, wrote plays for home theater. At 22, Louise wrote her first book, Flower Fables, which included stories written for Ellen Emerson, daughter of Ralph Waldo Emerson. During the Civil War, she served as a nurse at a military hospital in Georgetown. In 1863, her letters to relatives, which she sent from the hospital, were published in a revised form, and this book brought her first, albeit not very wide, fame.  Gaining popularity and later life In 1868, Olcott`s most famous and popular book, Little Women, was published, which tells the story of the growing up of the four daughters of the March family: Mag, Joe, Beth and Amy. It was created at the request of Boston publisher Thomas Niles, who asked Olcott to write a "book for girls." Her older sister Anna served as the prototype for Meg, she expressed herself in the image of Joe, and the images of Beth and Amy were based on her younger sisters Elizabeth and May, respectively. The success of the book prompted the writer to write several novels related to this work: in 1869, a sequel was published entitled "Good Wives", which is often published along with the first part of the novel and tells about the youth of the March sisters and their marriage; in 1871 the book "Little Men" was published, also semi-autobiographical, telling about the nephews of the writer; finally, in 1886, Joe`s Boys came out. In addition, many of Olcott`s later stories and novellas echoed Little Women. Unlike Joe March, her literary incarnation, Louise May Alcott has never been married. In 1879, after the death of her sister May, the writer brought up her two-year-old niece Louise May Neriker (she was named after her aunt and even received the same family nickname - Lulu). Olcott later became a women`s rights activist and was the first woman to register for elections in Concord, Massachusetts. Despite her deteriorating health, Olcott continued to write until her death. She died in Boston on March 6, 1888 from the effects of prolonged mercury poisoning (due to typhoid fever, she took calomel for a long time).