Last Call

Last Call by 9395

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One-time professional gambler Scott Crane hasn′t returned to Las Vegas, or held a hand of cards, in ten years. But troubling nightmares about a strange poker game he once attended on a houseboat on Lake Mead -- a contest he believed he walked away from a big winner -- are drawing him back to the magical city. Because the mythic game did not end that night in 1969. And the price of his winnings was his soul. And now a pot far more strange and perilous than he ever could imagine depends on the turning of a card.

547 pages, published in
9395

A book by 9395

Tim Powers was born on February 29, 1952 in Buffalo (New York) to a large family of Irish immigrants. When the boy was seven years old, his father was offered a job in California and the whole family happily moved there, leaving behind Tim`s rather unpleasant memories of the cold New York climate. As a teenager, Tim began to read everything that came to hand - Stevenson, Dumas, Mark Twain, and when he was eleven years old, his mother gave him a volume of Heinlein and Tim Powers discovered science fiction. Tim Powers had a desire to become a writer himself very early and was motivated primarily by the belief that "a writer can do the coolest things." “I got my first rejection when I was thirteen,” recalls Tim Powers. - In 1965, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction published how to send a story there and I said, “Wow! I will do it!" So I wrote something similar to the story that appeared in the previous issue, sent it away and of course they kicked me off. But I was ...

Last Call PDF

Tim Powers was born on February 29, 1952 in Buffalo (New York) to a large family of Irish immigrants. When the boy was seven years old, his father was offered a job in California and the whole family happily moved there, leaving behind Tim`s rather unpleasant memories of the cold New York climate. As a teenager, Tim began to read everything that came to hand - Stevenson, Dumas, Mark Twain, and when he was eleven years old, his mother gave him a volume of Heinlein and Tim Powers discovered science fiction. Tim Powers had a desire to become a writer himself very early and was motivated primarily by the belief that "a writer can do the coolest things." “I got my first rejection when I was thirteen,” recalls Tim Powers. - In 1965, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction published how to send a story there and I said, “Wow! I will do it!" So I wrote something similar to the story that appeared in the previous issue, sent it away and of course they kicked me off. But I was overjoyed at the first real rejection. Look! Just like Hemingway! I`m one of these guys! I thought I could keep getting rejected, so once or twice a year I would write a story, put it in the mailbox and get another rejection. " In 1970, Powers attended California State University in Fullerton, where he majored in English literature and received his BA in 1976. During his studies, he first discovered Faulkner, Joyce, Miller and Dante, and also met and befriended James Blaylock and C.W. Jeter, who were also students at the time, and later, like Powers, became famous science fiction writers. In 1972, Tim Powers made acquaintance with Philip Dick, by that time a very venerable writer who had just moved to California. At the time, Powers confessed, he knew at best only a few of Dick`s stories. “I don`t know how his work influenced me,” says Powers himself. - Now I have read all his books. He was a genius. He could sit down and write an absolutely delightful book in twenty days. " Powers and his friend C.W. Jeter (known in Russia primarily as the author of the novel "Bladerunner-2") became the prototypes of David and Kevin, characters in Dick`s famous novel "Valis". Powers graduated in 1976 with a BA in English. In the same year, two of his novels were published - the post-apocalyptic Epitaph in Rust, and The Skies Discrowned, influenced by Raphael Sabbatini (author of a series of popular “pirate” novels about Captain Peter Blade). The release of these books went almost unnoticed by critics and readers alike. (Much later Powers revised both novels significantly.) Success began to come to Tim Powers in 1979, after the publication of his third book, The Drawing of the Dark. The historical fantasy novel was nominated for a Locus Award. In 1980, Powers married Serena Batsford. The marriage turns out to be extremely successful - Tim and Serena live happily together to this day. For his 1983 novel The Anubis Gates, Tim Powers was awarded his first literary prize. It is quite symbolic that she won the Philip K. Dick Award. Later, Powers received the French Apollo Award for the same book. In The Gate of Anubis, Tim Powers refers to his beloved fictional poet, William Ashbless. “The protagonist Brendan Doyle explores the biography and writings of the early Victorian poet William Ashbless (Tim Powers and James Blaylock both wrote poetry in imitation of Ashbless, including the joint Offering the Bicentennial Edition of the Complete Twelve Hours of the Night "(Presentation of the Bicentennial Anniversary Edition of All Twelve O`clock in the Night 1985)), travels back in time to London in 1810, where captivity and traditional injury await him. Then the plot unfolds with masterly speed. Egyptian magic, described with all the details, terms and rituals it needs, mingles with insane, feverish imagery of the hidden life of the big city (carefully translated into the book from the works of Charles Dickens). Ghostly monsters roam the city alleys. And Doyle rushes back into the past and forward into Ashbless`s body, and becomes Ashbless himself. Fantasy, SF, horror, and history merge easily and naturally in this book. " [From Klute & Nichols Encyclopedia] Powers` subsequent novels are very varied. He explores the pirate theme in On Stranger Tides, then returns to the post-apocalyptic future by mixing it with vampires and horror - The Stress of Her Regard, released in 2000 the novel [Declare] combines the features of a historical and political thriller and (as, indeed, in all previous cases) the invariable attributes of solid fantasy. Tim Powers also tried his hand at graphic design, lecturing six times in writing courses at Clarion Science Fiction Writers. Workshop, twice with Algis Budrys in Writers of the Future Workshop. Powers is the author of the fantasy trilogy [Fault Lines], one of the parts of which is supposedly going to be filmed and collections of stories [Night Moves and Other Stories] (2001) and [Strange Itineraries] (2005). Tim and his wife Serena currently live in San Bernardino, Southern California. The first attempts to publish Tim Powers` works in Russian were made by AST publishing house in 1997. The novels "On Strange Waves" and "The Gate of Anubis", published in the "Age of the Dragon" series, did not gain much popularity among the reading public, publishers complained about their low commercial success and difficulties with translation. As a result, a cross was put on the commercial "professional suitability" of Tim Powers` work in Russia. Only in 2002 did EKSMO decide to make a second attempt, publishing the novel "Black on Black", and as for AST, Powers` books are published in the "orange" series "Alternative. Fiction".