Beyond The Chocolate War

Beyond The Chocolate War by Robert Kormer

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Robert Kormer

A book by Robert Kormer

Robert Cormier (eng.

Robert Cormier ) American writer and journalist. photo credit: Jill Krementz Robert Kormer has lived his entire life in Leominster, a small town north of central Massachusetts, where he grew up in a gated community of immigrants from French Canada. His wife Koni (she is also from Leominster) still lives in the house where they raised their three daughters and a son. They never had a reason to leave this house. “There is still a lot to be told about what is happening here on Leominster`s main street,” as Robert Kormer once said after being a newspaper reporter and commentator for 30 years. He has written articles and reports for newspapers such as Worster Telegram, Newspapers and Fitchburg Sentinel. The events of these reports often inspired him to new literary works, which made his work unique. In them, everything evil became understandable and explainable, while, of course, remaining evil. “It’s very important for me to be able to scare the reader,” he once told a reporter for School Library magazine. “Because it’s important to know how one person can control others while abusing power.” This theme is presented to the reader in full growth in his most famous book for the young reader "The Chocolate War", after reading which, one of his fifteen-year-old fan said: "You always describe a person from the inside." Robert Kormer has traveled extensively around the world. He traveled both to New Zealand and Australia (where he felt particular excitement, touching the surface of the Indian Ocean with his hands), and in most of Europe, where he spoke at schools, colleges and universities, in front of the library workers` association and in front of teachers. At home in America, he visited almost every state. And for all his love of travel, as he said many times, he happily returns home to Leominster. Robert Kormer was educated in a Catholic parish school where, in the seventh grade, a teacher discovered his ability to write. But he said that he always wanted to write: “I don’t remember a time when I didn’t try to portray something on paper”. His first poems were published in the Leominster Daily Enterprises, and his first professional publication occurred when he first entered Fitchburgh State College. Unbeknownst to him, his teacher, Florenc Colon, sent his short story to The Sign, a national Catholic magazine. The story was titled "Little Things That Can Count," for which Robert was sent a $ 75 royalty free.

As an author, Robert Kormer began working at WTAG radio station in Worcester, Massachusetts, where he wrote scripts and broadcast commercials since 1946.

until 1948. In 1948 he began his career as a promising newspaper reporter at the Worcester Telegram, first in the Leominster office and then in Fitchburg. He had a weekly column about interesting people in the Stories about Our Land section. In 1955, Robert Kormer began writing for the Fitchburg Sentinel, which later became the Fitchburg-Leominster Sentinel, and then for Interprais as a city and later political columnist. He later became a consultant and lead editor, and ran a popular section twice a week under the pseudonym John Fitch IV. In 1974, this section won the National Thomas Award as the most popular newspaper section of the year. In the same year, the Association of Journalists awarded him the Best Field Reporting Award. In 1978, he left his job at the newspaper to devote all his time to books. Robert Cormer`s first novel, Now and at the Hour, was published in 1960. Deeply impressed by the death of his father, he wrote a novel that delighted critics. The novel was published in Time magazine for five weeks under the heading Recommended Reading. Then in 1963. followed by the publication of the novel A Little Raw on Monday Morning and in 1965. "Take Me Where the Good Times Are", also backed by criticism, and the Newark Bar Association (not New York) declared the author "one of America`s finest Catholic novelists." In 1974, The Chocolate War was published, which became a bestseller for a quarter of a century after publication. The Chocolate War has been the target of censorship for its uncompromising realism. The title page of The New York Times Book Review dealt with the specific problems of children that had been masterfully described in this book. For which the author received many awards and honors, the main of which was the study of this story in schools and colleges around the world, and translation into almost a dozen languages ​​of the world. Then in 1977. "I am Cheese" and "After the First Death" were published in 1979. These three books identified Robert Kormer as the master of the youth novel. In 1991 he was awarded the Margaret A.

Edwards Award by the American Library Association`s Youth Branch, citing the book trio as "powerful, brilliant and haunted novels that have achieved classic youth literary status." In 1982, the National Council of Teachers of English and Literature for Young People (ALAN) honored Robert Kormer with the Significant Contribution to Youth Literature Award for his “creativity”. Eight Plus One, an anthology of short stories that appeared in magazines such as the Saturday Evening Post, The Sign, and Redbook, in 1980. Later, many of these stories were published in a collection. Stories such as "Mustache", "Where Are You, President Cleveland?" and "Mine on Thursdays" were included in school textbooks and anthologies. This anthology received the World of Reading Readers` Choice Award, sponsored by the Silver Burdett and Ginn. Young readers voted to present the Robert Kormer Prize. The collection of short stories I Have Words to Spend, published in various newspapers and magazines, was compiled and edited by his wife, Connie, and published in 1991. Other novellas and novels by Robert Kormer, including Still the Bumblebee Flies (1983), After the Chocolate War (1985), Disappearance (1988), Bells Ringing For Us (1990) , "Our Fall" (1991), "Melodies for Dancing at the Bear Party" (1992), "At Midnight" (1995), "Tenderness" (1997), "Heroes" (1998) and Frenchtown Summer (1999) is a novel that won the Los Angeles Time Literary Prize for Youth Fiction in April 2000. All of his stories and novels received deserved attention and honors from criticism. "In the Night" and "Tenderness" were awarded the Carnegie Medal in England, and the novel "Heroes" was declared "Highly Recommended" (a quote from the presentation of this award and a unique honor, because the Carnegie Medal was traditionally awarded only to a book written in Britain). Robert Kormer`s books have often been attacked by censorship organizations for their uncompromising descriptions of the painful problems that young people face every day in a seething world. Educators and publishers quickly noted the extraordinary instructiveness, value, and morality of his books. His novels are taught in hundreds of schools, youth and youth literary courses at colleges and universities. Although many of his books are written for a young reader, they are read by people of all ages and enjoy the work of Robert Kormer. His themes are sometimes extremely topical, and often his good heroes will not have the happiest ending. Kormer`s compelling stories explore some of the darkest corners of the human psyche, but the focus is always on morality and intellectual exploration, which forces readers to step into the hero`s shoes and explore their own feelings and ethical beliefs. In an interview, Robert Kormer was asked if he had achieved what he set out to do at the beginning of his writing career. He responded with characteristic humility: “Oh, yes. My dream was to become a famous author and be able to write at least one book that people would read. This dream came true with the publication of my first novel, and everything else was just a pleasant gift from above. All I ever wanted to do was write.

" *** Posthumous biography of the author in the original language, and above the same in Russian translation (from another source).

(Please note that this page was compiled by IPL staff who corresponded with this author in 1996.

It has not been updated since.

Robert Cormier passed away on November 2, 2000.) Robert Cormier was born and has always lived in Leominster, Massachusets. He grew up there, went to school there, courted and married there, and raised four children in the house where he and his wife, Connie, still live. "I never intend to live anywhere else," he says.

"There are lots of untold stories right here on Main Street." Cormier, who was a newspaper reporter and columnist for 30 years is inspired by news events and, in some cases, by circumstances in his own life for the basis of his plots. And, he has an outstanding ability to create stories which capture human interest. No critic has ever captured more succinctly Cormier`s ability to make us see what motivates behavior which is often called evil but which becomes understandable when seen through the eyes of his characters.

"I take real people and put them in extraordinary situations," he said in an interview in SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL. "I`m very much interested in intimidation.

And the way people manipulate other people.

And the obvious abuse of authority." Robert Cormier began writing, he says, "in the seventh grade ...

I can`t remember a time when I wasn`t trying to get something down on paper." And it has been said of him that he was in love with his typewriter. He has won many prizes for his journalism and his novels for young adults. Included in his awards is the Margaret A.

Edwards Award of the Young Adult Services Division of the American Library Association. This award is presented in recognition of those authors who provide young adults with a window through which they can view the world, and which will help them to grow and understand themselves and their role in society.

"I am delighted to be the recipient of this award, "he says," because it is such a clear reflection of what I`ve always hoped my novels could do - show adolsescents the bigness of what`s out there and that happy endings are not our birthright.

You have to do something to make them happen.

" Cormier loves to travel and has visited almost every state in the US A trip to Australia where he dipped his hand in the Indian Ocean thrilled him beyond measure. He also loves jazz, movies, and staying up late (to hear jazz and watch movies) and his true heroes are writers like Graham Greene, Thomas Wolfe, and JD Salinger. Cormier`s books have been translated into many languages ​​and consistently appear on the Best Books for Young Adults lists of the American Libary Association, THE NEW YORK TIMES, and SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL.  Wikipedia , Wikipedia , IMDb < / a>.  Bibliography Series Chocolate War 1974 - 1.

The Chocolate War 1985 - 2.

Beyond the Chocolate War - After the Chocolate War 2008 - Chocolate War and Beyond the Chocolate War (omnibus) Novels 1960 - Now and At the Hour - This Hour 1963 - A Little Raw on Monday Mornings - Drizzle Monday Morning 1965 - Take Me Where the Good Times Are - Take Me to the Good Times 1977 - I Am the Cheese - I Am Cheese 1979 - After the First Death - After the First Death 1983 - The Bumblebee Flies Away - And Still Bumblebee Flies 1988 - Fade - Disappearance 1990 - Other Bells for Us to Ring - Bells Ringing Us 1991 - We All Fall Down - Our Fall 1992 - Tunes for Bears to Dance to - Tunes for Bears Dance 1995 - In the Middle of the Night - At Midnight 1997 - Tenderness - Tenderness 1998 - Heroes - Heroes 2001 - The Rag and Bone Shop 2008 - The Bumblebee Flies Anyway Collections [/ b ] 1980 - Eight Plus One - Eight Plus One 1999 - Frenchtown Summer - Frenchtown Summer Non fiction 1991 - I Have Words to Spend - I Have Enough Words

Beyond The Chocolate War PDF

Robert Cormier (eng. Robert Cormier ) American writer and journalist. photo credit: Jill Krementz Robert Kormer has lived his entire life in Leominster, a small town north of central Massachusetts, where he grew up in a gated community of immigrants from French Canada. His wife Koni (she is also from Leominster) still lives in the house where they raised their three daughters and a son. They never had a reason to leave this house. “There is still a lot to be told about what is happening here on Leominster`s main street,” as Robert Kormer once said after being a newspaper reporter and commentator for 30 years. He has written articles and reports for newspapers such as Worster Telegram, Newspapers and Fitchburg Sentinel. The events of these reports often inspired him to new literary works, which made his work unique. In them, everything evil became understandable and explainable, while, of course, remaining evil. “It’s very important for me to be able to scare the reader,” he once told a reporter for School Library magazine. “Because it’s important to know how one person can control others while abusing power.” This theme is presented to the reader in full growth in his most famous book for the young reader "The Chocolate War", after reading which, one of his fifteen-year-old fan said: "You always describe a person from the inside." Robert Kormer has traveled extensively around the world. He traveled both to New Zealand and Australia (where he felt particular excitement, touching the surface of the Indian Ocean with his hands), and in most of Europe, where he spoke at schools, colleges and universities, in front of the library workers` association and in front of teachers. At home in America, he visited almost every state. And for all his love of travel, as he said many times, he happily returns home to Leominster. Robert Kormer was educated in a Catholic parish school where, in the seventh grade, a teacher discovered his ability to write. But he said that he always wanted to write: “I don’t remember a time when I didn’t try to portray something on paper”. His first poems were published in the Leominster Daily Enterprises, and his first professional publication occurred when he first entered Fitchburgh State College. Unbeknownst to him, his teacher, Florenc Colon, sent his short story to The Sign, a national Catholic magazine. The story was titled "Little Things That Can Count," for which Robert was sent a $ 75 royalty free. As an author, Robert Kormer began working at WTAG radio station in Worcester, Massachusetts, where he wrote scripts and broadcast commercials since 1946. until 1948. In 1948 he began his career as a promising newspaper reporter at the Worcester Telegram, first in the Leominster office and then in Fitchburg. He had a weekly column about interesting people in the Stories about Our Land section. In 1955, Robert Kormer began writing for the Fitchburg Sentinel, which later became the Fitchburg-Leominster Sentinel, and then for Interprais as a city and later political columnist. He later became a consultant and lead editor, and ran a popular section twice a week under the pseudonym John Fitch IV. In 1974, this section won the National Thomas Award as the most popular newspaper section of the year. In the same year, the Association of Journalists awarded him the Best Field Reporting Award. In 1978, he left his job at the newspaper to devote all his time to books. Robert Cormer`s first novel, Now and at the Hour, was published in 1960. Deeply impressed by the death of his father, he wrote a novel that delighted critics. The novel was published in Time magazine for five weeks under the heading Recommended Reading. Then in 1963. followed by the publication of the novel A Little Raw on Monday Morning and in 1965. "Take Me Where the Good Times Are", also backed by criticism, and the Newark Bar Association (not New York) declared the author "one of America`s finest Catholic novelists." In 1974, The Chocolate War was published, which became a bestseller for a quarter of a century after publication. The Chocolate War has been the target of censorship for its uncompromising realism. The title page of The New York Times Book Review dealt with the specific problems of children that had been masterfully described in this book. For which the author received many awards and honors, the main of which was the study of this story in schools and colleges around the world, and translation into almost a dozen languages ​​of the world. Then in 1977. "I am Cheese" and "After the First Death" were published in 1979. These three books identified Robert Kormer as the master of the youth novel. In 1991 he was awarded the Margaret A. Edwards Award by the American Library Association`s Youth Branch, citing the book trio as "powerful, brilliant and haunted novels that have achieved classic youth literary status." In 1982, the National Council of Teachers of English and Literature for Young People (ALAN) honored Robert Kormer with the Significant Contribution to Youth Literature Award for his “creativity”. Eight Plus One, an anthology of short stories that appeared in magazines such as the Saturday Evening Post, The Sign, and Redbook, in 1980. Later, many of these stories were published in a collection. Stories such as "Mustache", "Where Are You, President Cleveland?" and "Mine on Thursdays" were included in school textbooks and anthologies. This anthology received the World of Reading Readers` Choice Award, sponsored by the Silver Burdett and Ginn. Young readers voted to present the Robert Kormer Prize. The collection of short stories I Have Words to Spend, published in various newspapers and magazines, was compiled and edited by his wife, Connie, and published in 1991. Other novellas and novels by Robert Kormer, including Still the Bumblebee Flies (1983), After the Chocolate War (1985), Disappearance (1988), Bells Ringing For Us (1990) , "Our Fall" (1991), "Melodies for Dancing at the Bear Party" (1992), "At Midnight" (1995), "Tenderness" (1997), "Heroes" (1998) and Frenchtown Summer (1999) is a novel that won the Los Angeles Time Literary Prize for Youth Fiction in April 2000. All of his stories and novels received deserved attention and honors from criticism. "In the Night" and "Tenderness" were awarded the Carnegie Medal in England, and the novel "Heroes" was declared "Highly Recommended" (a quote from the presentation of this award and a unique honor, because the Carnegie Medal was traditionally awarded only to a book written in Britain). Robert Kormer`s books have often been attacked by censorship organizations for their uncompromising descriptions of the painful problems that young people face every day in a seething world. Educators and publishers quickly noted the extraordinary instructiveness, value, and morality of his books. His novels are taught in hundreds of schools, youth and youth literary courses at colleges and universities. Although many of his books are written for a young reader, they are read by people of all ages and enjoy the work of Robert Kormer. His themes are sometimes extremely topical, and often his good heroes will not have the happiest ending. Kormer`s compelling stories explore some of the darkest corners of the human psyche, but the focus is always on morality and intellectual exploration, which forces readers to step into the hero`s shoes and explore their own feelings and ethical beliefs. In an interview, Robert Kormer was asked if he had achieved what he set out to do at the beginning of his writing career. He responded with characteristic humility: “Oh, yes. My dream was to become a famous author and be able to write at least one book that people would read. This dream came true with the publication of my first novel, and everything else was just a pleasant gift from above. All I ever wanted to do was write. " *** Posthumous biography of the author in the original language, and above the same in Russian translation (from another source). (Please note that this page was compiled by IPL staff who corresponded with this author in 1996. It has not been updated since. Robert Cormier passed away on November 2, 2000.) Robert Cormier was born and has always lived in Leominster, Massachusets. He grew up there, went to school there, courted and married there, and raised four children in the house where he and his wife, Connie, still live. "I never intend to live anywhere else," he says. "There are lots of untold stories right here on Main Street." Cormier, who was a newspaper reporter and columnist for 30 years is inspired by news events and, in some cases, by circumstances in his own life for the basis of his plots. And, he has an outstanding ability to create stories which capture human interest. No critic has ever captured more succinctly Cormier`s ability to make us see what motivates behavior which is often called evil but which becomes understandable when seen through the eyes of his characters. "I take real people and put them in extraordinary situations," he said in an interview in SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL. "I`m very much interested in intimidation. And the way people manipulate other people. And the obvious abuse of authority." Robert Cormier began writing, he says, "in the seventh grade ... I can`t remember a time when I wasn`t trying to get something down on paper." And it has been said of him that he was in love with his typewriter. He has won many prizes for his journalism and his novels for young adults. Included in his awards is the Margaret A. Edwards Award of the Young Adult Services Division of the American Library Association. This award is presented in recognition of those authors who provide young adults with a window through which they can view the world, and which will help them to grow and understand themselves and their role in society. "I am delighted to be the recipient of this award, "he says," because it is such a clear reflection of what I`ve always hoped my novels could do - show adolsescents the bigness of what`s out there and that happy endings are not our birthright. You have to do something to make them happen. " Cormier loves to travel and has visited almost every state in the US A trip to Australia where he dipped his hand in the Indian Ocean thrilled him beyond measure. He also loves jazz, movies, and staying up late (to hear jazz and watch movies) and his true heroes are writers like Graham Greene, Thomas Wolfe, and JD Salinger. Cormier`s books have been translated into many languages ​​and consistently appear on the Best Books for Young Adults lists of the American Libary Association, THE NEW YORK TIMES, and SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL.  Wikipedia , Wikipedia , IMDb .  Bibliography Series Chocolate War 1974 - 1. The Chocolate War 1985 - 2. Beyond the Chocolate War - After the Chocolate War 2008 - Chocolate War and Beyond the Chocolate War (omnibus) Novels 1960 - Now and At the Hour - This Hour 1963 - A Little Raw on Monday Mornings - Drizzle Monday Morning 1965 - Take Me Where the Good Times Are - Take Me to the Good Times 1977 - I Am the Cheese - I Am Cheese 1979 - After the First Death - After the First Death 1983 - The Bumblebee Flies Away - And Still Bumblebee Flies 1988 - Fade - Disappearance 1990 - Other Bells for Us to Ring - Bells Ringing Us 1991 - We All Fall Down - Our Fall 1992 - Tunes for Bears to Dance to - Tunes for Bears Dance 1995 - In the Middle of the Night - At Midnight 1997 - Tenderness - Tenderness 1998 - Heroes - Heroes 2001 - The Rag and Bone Shop 2008 - The Bumblebee Flies Anyway Collections [/ b ] 1980 - Eight Plus One - Eight Plus One 1999 - Frenchtown Summer - Frenchtown Summer Non fiction 1991 - I Have Words to Spend - I Have Enough Words